Anthony Anderson

Anthony Anderson

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Biography

Born and raised in Compton, California, Anderson is the son of a career film extra and her entrepreneur husband. As a toddler, he accompanied his mother to several film sets, and by the time he was four years old, he knew acting was his destiny. While pursuing his career, Anderson continued his education, attending the High School for the Performing Arts, where he earned first place in the NAACP's ACTSO Awards with his performance of the classic monologue from "The Great White Hope." That performance and his dedication and talent, earned him an arts scholarship to Howard University. After college, Anderson was eager to return to Los Angeles to pursue acting.



Biography by Contactmusic.com

Nene Leakes Is Leaving ‘The Real Housewives Of Atlanta’, But What’s Next For The Reality Star?


Nene Leakes Real Housewives Betty White Anthony Anderson

Nene Leakes will no longer be appearing on The Real Housewives of Atlanta. The 47-year-old reality star announced the news on Tuesday (30th June) yet she already has plans to move on to a game show, To Tell the Truth.

NeNe LeakesNeNe Leakes will be a panellist on To Tell the Truth.

Read More: NeNe Leakes Is Moving Out Of The Real Housewives Of Atlanta After Seven Seasons.

Continue reading: Nene Leakes Is Leaving ‘The Real Housewives Of Atlanta’, But What’s Next For The Reality Star?

2015 BET Awards

Tracee Ellis Ross and Anthony Anderson - 2015 BET Awards at the Microsoft Theater - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 28th June 2015

Tracee Ellis Ross and Anthony Anderson
Tracee Ellis Ross and Anthony Anderson

2015 BET Awards - Arrivals

Anthony Anderson and Tracee Ellis Ross - 2015 BET Awards held at the Microsoft Theater - Arrivals at Microsoft Theater - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 28th June 2015

The Paley Center for Media's tribute to African-American Achievements in Television

Anthony Anderson - A host of stars were snapped as they arrived for the Paley Center for Media's tribute to African-American Achievements in Television which was held at the Cipriani Wall Street in New York, United States - Wednesday 13th May 2015

Anthony Anderson

Entertainment Weekly And PEOPLE Party

Jeff Garlin and Anthony Anderson - Entertainment Weekly And PEOPLE Celebrate The New York Upfronts - Arrivals - Manhattan, New York, United States - Tuesday 12th May 2015

Jeff Garlin

The eighth annual George Lopez Celebrity Golf Classic presented by Sabra - Arrivals

Anthony Anderson, Michael G. Wilson and Arsenio Hall - The eighth annual George Lopez Celebrity Golf Classic presented by Sabra - Arrivals at Lakeside Golf Club - Toluca Lake, California, United States - Monday 4th May 2015

Don Cheadle and Anthony Anderson
Don Cheadle and Anthony Anderson
Don Cheadle and Anthony Anderson
Anthony Anderson
Anthony Anderson

The Town That Dreaded Sundown Review


OK

Layers of real life and movie history combine cleverly in this postmodern horror film, which just might be too knowing for its own good. But at least it's an unusual approach to the genre, offering a twisted retelling of a legend while aiming for some emotional resonance along with the usual violent nastiness. It's also directed with an unusually artful eye by first-time filmmaker Alfonso Gomez-Rejon.

It was a series of unsolved murders in a small town on the Texas-Arkansas border in 1946 that inspired the 1976 movie of the same name, which screens here annually on Halloween. But this year, the screening is accompanied by a copycat murder, which escalates into a full-on rampage. Everything seems to centre around Jami (Addison Timlin), a teenager whose boyfriend was the first victim. After her parents died, she was raised by her straight-talking grandmother (Veronica Cartwright), who continually urges her to take charge of her life. So with the local cops unable to solve the case, Jami teams up with the local library archive clerk Nick (Travis Tope) to get the whole history of these past events. Meanwhile, a Texas Ranger (Anthony Anderson) arrives to head up the official investigation.

Screenwriter Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa gleefully blends fact, fiction and the movies together into a heady mixture of horror movie cliches and shockingly realistic grisliness. In other words, this is both a fictional sequel and a playful true-life drama at the same time, which makes it feel eerily like the Scream franchise. Although this film never becomes a pastiche, and the characters are so likeable that we genuinely root for them to survive the killing spree. Timlin brings the right amount of plucky stubbornness to her role, even if it's unlikely that a witness-victim would be quite so gung-ho about doing her own police work. And there are nice turns from veterans like Cartwright, Ed Lautner (as a stubborn cop) and the late Edward Herrmann (as a nutty preacher) to add some weight.

Continue reading: The Town That Dreaded Sundown Review

Video - Cedric The Entertainer Makes An Entrance At BET Honors 2013 - Part 1


Celebrities and business people are snapped on the red carpet at the 2013 BET Honors. Among them is funnyman Cedric The Entertainer who, as usual, makes a grand entrance by waltzing up and down the carpet in front of the step-and-repeat. 'Avatar' star Laz Alonso and Anthony Anderson from 'All About the Andersons' also make appearances.

Continue: Video - Cedric The Entertainer Makes An Entrance At BET Honors 2013 - Part 1

Scream 4 Review


Good
More than a decade after Scream 3, Craven and company reteam for another knowing thriller about scary movies. And by both following and subverting the rules of a reboot, they make a film that's both frightening and hilarious.

On the 10th anniversary of the original killings, Sidney (Campbell) returns to Woodsboro, having put the darkness behind her. Although the Stab movies based on her experience have reached number 7. Then a new spree of grisliness starts, and Sheriff Dewey (Arquette) and his journalist wife Gale (Cox) are on the case. Meanwhile, Sidney's cousin Jill (Roberts) and her pals (Pannettiere and Jaffe) are both fascinated and terrified by what's happening. So are the school's movie geeks (Knudsen and Culkin) and Jill's ex (Tortorella).

Continue reading: Scream 4 Review

The Back-up Plan Review


OK
As far as romantic comedies go, this is just about watchable. Even though it's both silly and sappy, it has a vaguely realistic tone that lets us identify with the characters. Even if the romance falls flat, the romance is sweet.

Zoe (Lopez) is a busy but single New Yorker desperate to have a child, so she heads to the sperm bank. After her doctor (Klein) helps her conceive, even a clash with an annoying stranger, Stan (O'Loughlin), can't ruin her day. Of course, she runs into him again, and this time notices that he's both annoying and drop-dead gorgeous. So how will he react when he finds out that Zoe is pregnant?

Continue reading: The Back-up Plan Review

Transformers Review


Weak
For the first five minutes of Transformers -- a sound-and-fury tornado of effects that could only entertain during summer's dumb-dumb dog days -- you will believe that bombastic blockbuster director Michael Bay was the right choice to helm the project. Peter Cullen, who has voiced heroic robot Optimus Prime since the original Transformers cartoon of 1984, explains the series' legacy as his velvet voice establishes this new movie's driving quest: The search for a hidden cube that is the centerpiece of an age-old war. Geeks will go crazy.

The film's final 45 minutes lend credence to the notion that Bay deserved the job. Essentially an endless battle between the Autobots (good) and the Decepticons (bad), the conclusion of Transformers raises the bar for summer movie special effects to an unattainable height. Bay and the wizards at Industrial Light & Magic cram so much eye candy into every frame, my corneas have cavities.

Continue reading: Transformers Review

The Departed Review


Excellent
Just as Spike Lee took a basic caper and added his own pet issues to elevate Inside Man to the upper echelons of its genre, Martin Scorsese has taken The Departed, based on an intriguingly simple premise, to its own heights by infusing issues that have concerned him ever since Mean Streets. Along the way, he makes room for some memorable performances, not the least of which comes from the most likely of sources.

The Departed is based on the Hong Kong blockbuster Infernal Affairs, in which a cop goes undercover in the mob while the mob places one of their own as a mole in the police force. In Scorsese's version, the scene shifts to Boston, where mob boss Frank Costello (Jack Nicholson) puts loyal-from-boyhood employee Colin Sullivan (Matt Damon) through police training. As Sullivan rises through the ranks, Special Investigations Unit chiefs Queenan (Martin Sheen) and Dignam (Mark Wahlberg) recruit rookie Billy Costigan (Leonardo DiCaprio) to get "kicked off" the force and do time to gain Costello's confidence.

Continue reading: The Departed Review

See Spot Run Review


Grim
David Arquette gets to reinforce his status as the goofy doofus once again in this below-average family comedy about a boy, a dog, and a dumb, sloppy, immature mailman (that would be Arquette). Peering through this half-assed attempt at a funny movie, it's easy to see that the laughs are few and the comic action is a bore -- even the dog looks kind of fed up.

Arquette, however, through the muck of this movie, is actually good as the hapless idiot. Sure, he's played the part before, but in a film like this, Arquette gets to be genuinely likable, especially in the face of the W.C. Fields edict (never work with dogs or children). Maybe it's his childish demeanor or puppy dog face that makes him fit right in, but he's one of the only bright spots of this film.

Continue reading: See Spot Run Review

Somersault Review


Weak
Despite its title, Cate Shortland's Somersault has no impressive feats of gymnastic ability in its 105 minutes. Instead, we are treated to another story of a young woman discovering both love and sexuality, while also learning the crucial differences between them. My Summer of Love, an impassioned, but wholly contrived film that debuted earlier this year, looked at these events in the face of a young lesbian (bisexual?) relationship. Shortland goes for the straight and narrow.

Heidi (Abbie Cornish) is a naïve teen who lives with her mom and her boyfriend. Before your mind starts flopping around in the gutter, no, the boyfriend does not molest her and he is not an abusive drunk. One morning, after her mom leaves, Heidi comes onto the boyfriend and they begin to kiss, right as Heidi's mom, Nicole (Olivia Pigeot) comes back in to catch them. Quickly, Heidi runs off to the town of Jindabyne, where she shacks up with a local yuppie for a place to stay. Second night, she meets the mysterious and handsome Joe (Sam Worthington), who takes her back to a hotel where they have at it, like we all know they will. Heidi makes friends with the hotel manager Irene (Lynette Curran) and takes a job at the local gas station with Bianca (Hollie Andrew), a strange, presumptuous woman around Heidi's age. The film mainly consists of Heidi trying to keep these relationships in check and trying to make a life out of the nothing that she has.

Continue reading: Somersault Review

The Departed Review


Excellent

Just as Spike Lee took a basic caper and added his own pet issues to elevate Inside Man to the upper echelons of its genre, Martin Scorsese has taken The Departed, based on an intriguingly simple premise, to its own heights by infusing issues that have concerned him ever since Mean Streets. Along the way, he makes room for some memorable performances, not the least of which comes from the most likely of sources.

The Departed is based on the Hong Kong blockbuster Infernal Affairs, in which a cop goes undercover in the mob while the mob places one of their own as a mole in the police force. In Scorsese's version, the scene shifts to Boston, where mob boss Frank Costello (Jack Nicholson) puts loyal-from-boyhood employee Colin Sullivan (Matt Damon) through police training. As Sullivan rises through the ranks, Special Investigations Unit chiefs Queenan (Martin Sheen) and Dignam (Mark Wahlberg) recruit rookie Billy Costigan (Leonardo DiCaprio) to get "kicked off" the force and do time to gain Costello's confidence.

All of this happens before the opening titles.

Continue reading: The Departed Review

Anthony Anderson

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