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David Calvitto, Jeff Fahey, Paul Anthony Barber, Edward Franklin, Robert Blythe, Nick Moran, Martin Shaw, Robert Shaw, Robert Vaughn, Miles Richardson, Martin Turner, Owen O'Neill and Jason Riddington - 'Twelve Angry Men' press photocall at the Garrick Theatre - London, United Kingdom - Friday 8th November 2013

David Calvitto, Jeff Fahey, Paul Anthony Barber, Edward Franklin, Robert Blythe, Nick Moran, Martin Shaw, Robert Shaw, Robert Vaughn, Miles Richardson, Martin Turner, Owen O'neill and Jason Riddington
Robert Vaughn, Jeff Fahey and Martin Shaw
David Calvitto, Jeff Fahey, Paul Anthony Barber, Edward Franklin, Robert Blythe, Nick Moran, Martin Shaw, Robert Shaw, Robert Vaughn, Miles Richardson, Martin Turner, Owen O'neill and Jason Riddington
David Calvitto, Jeff Fahey, Paul Anthony Barber, Edward Franklin, Robert Blythe, Nick Moran, Martin Shaw, Robert Shaw, Robert Vaughn, Miles Richardson, Martin Turner, Owen O'neill and Jason Riddington
Jeff Fahey
Martin Shaw and Jeff Fahey

Jaws Trailer


When a girl leaving a beach party on Amity Island, New England goes for an evening swim in the Atlantic, she is brutally attacked and eaten by a colossal great white shark. While the Mayor refuses to close the beach out of fear that the lack of tourism that would ensue would have a huge financial backlash on the town, another person is brutally killed. A bounty is placed on the shark which motivates amateur shark-hunters to go after it. However, they only managed to capture and kill a tiger shark which, while putting the public at ease as they assume it was the same creature, raises suspicions amongst a not so easily fooled group of people in the shape of a police chef, a fisherman and a marine scientist who determinedly set out to find and destroy the real menace.

Continue: Jaws Trailer

The Taking Of Pelham One Two Three (1974) Review


Excellent
An archeological specimen from nearly two decades before the advent of the Metrocard, Joseph Sargent's expert thriller The Taking of Pelham One Two Three, like brethren Serpico and The French Connection, is another quintessential 1970s New York City movie that might read as alien dialect to those who aren't familiar with the geocentric love/hate relationship between the city and its inhabitants. To those who are familiar, however, the film will unfold like ghostscript, a bygone era of Abe Beame, Gotham teetering on the brink of bankruptcy, and President Ford's apocryphal claim that the city could "drop dead."

There certainly aren't any Urban Outfitters to be seen in 1970s Manhattan, though a train ride on the 6 is still a life-and-death proposition. That becomes a bit more literal for the dozen or so that are held hostage on a single car by a pack of hijackers who refer to themselves by color; a gimmick Tarantino would cop 20 years later in Reservoir Dogs. The leader is a coiled ex-soldier-of-fortune who goes by Mr. Blue (the brilliant Robert Shaw, a year before Jaws) with Green (Martin Balsam), Grey (Hector Elizondo), and Brown (Earl Hindman) under him. His foil, a metro cop named Zach Garber, is oddly played by Walter Matthau.

Continue reading: The Taking Of Pelham One Two Three (1974) Review

The Sting Review


Extraordinary
It's one of cinema's most beloved heist movies, and for good reason: The Sting is balls-out fun from start to finish, a showstopper work for both Robert Redford and Paul Newman, and alternately funny and thrilling.

The plot must have been devilishly complex at the time. In more recent years we've had films like House of Games and The Spanish Prisoner that make The Sting's intricacies look like a story in a first-grader's textbook. It's the Depression, and Johnny Hooker (Redford) makes a living running quickie cons on the street. When he scams several thousand dollars off of a mob guy, the heat comes down from both the mafiosos looking for their money and the crooked cops, culminating in Hooker's partner getting killed and Hooker escaping the city for hopefully better climes.

Continue reading: The Sting Review

From Russia With Love Review


Extraordinary
The defeat of the titular arch-villain in the Bond series' inaugural Dr. No provides the fly in From Russia with Love's revenge-motivated ointment. Seeking to mete out payback on James Bond (Sean Connery) for eliminating their best and most evil megalomaniac, the global terrorist organization SPECTRE attempts to lure in the super-spy by using a Russian decoding machine as its dangling carrot.

As everyone knows, a piece of machinery isn't enough to set Bond into action. You need a piece of something else, and SPECTRE finds it in the form of Tatiana Romanova (Daniela Bianchi), a beautiful cipher clerk in the Soviet secret service who's got the goods on the decoder. Under instructions from the über-evil Rosa Klebb (the fabulous Lotta Lenya), a SPECTRE operative posing as a Soviet official, Tatiana agrees to her mission: To put out the signal that she wants to defect to the West, and that she's willing to smuggle the decoder too, provided that Bond escort her safely through the Iron Curtain.

Continue reading: From Russia With Love Review

From Russia With Love Review


Extraordinary
The defeat of the titular arch-villain in the Bond series' inaugural Dr. No provides the fly in From Russia with Love's revenge-motivated ointment. Seeking to mete out payback on James Bond (Sean Connery) for eliminating their best and most evil megalomaniac, the global terrorist organization SPECTRE attempts to lure in the super-spy by using a Russian decoding machine as its dangling carrot.

As everyone knows, a piece of machinery isn't enough to set Bond into action. You need a piece of something else, and SPECTRE finds it in the form of Tatiana Romanova (Daniela Bianchi), a beautiful cipher clerk in the Soviet secret service who's got the goods on the decoder. Under instructions from the über-evil Rosa Klebb (the fabulous Lotta Lenya), a SPECTRE operative posing as a Soviet official, Tatiana agrees to her mission: To put out the signal that she wants to defect to the West, and that she's willing to smuggle the decoder too, provided that Bond escort her safely through the Iron Curtain.

Continue reading: From Russia With Love Review

Black Sunday (1977) Review


Excellent
If the plot of Black Sunday seems familiar, that's probably because you're remembering the wholesale rip-off it was given by The Sum of All Fears just a year ago. But Sunday is immensely better. If you've seen the latter but not the original, you owe it to yourself to check it out.

The story has since been done to death: terrorist group plans to cause massive carnage, this time at the Super Bowl by blowing up the Good Year Blimp overhead. But Black Sunday is distinguished by its unique focus not on the hero but on the villain: Bruce Dern as an angry Vietnam vet, pilot, and former prisoner of war. He holds a grudge against the U.S. like you wouldn't believe (brainwashed? shellshocked?): Enough to convince him to join forces with a Palestinian militant group called Black September. It doesn't help that he's just plain crazy. Even the Black September operatives are a little afraid of what he might do.

Continue reading: Black Sunday (1977) Review

The Sting Review


Extraordinary
It's one of cinema's most beloved heist movies, and for good reason: The Sting is balls-out fun from start to finish, a showstopper work for both Robert Redford and Paul Newman, and alternately funny and thrilling.

The plot must have been devilishly complex at the time. In more recent years we've had films like House of Games and The Spanish Prisoner that make The Sting's intricacies look like a story in a first-grader's textbook. It's the Depression, and Johnny Hooker (Redford) makes a living running quickie cons on the street. When he scams several thousand dollars off of a mob guy, the heat comes down from both the mafiosos looking for their money and the crooked cops, culminating in Hooker's partner getting killed and Hooker escaping the city for hopefully better climes.

Continue reading: The Sting Review

Battle Of The Bulge Review


Good
This is the kind of a film around which rumors of a 212-minute print swirl, on the net, in chat rooms, and message boards. Only films that have garnered either cult or classic appeal can claim "hype" like that. No one talks about footage missing from the domestic release cut of Battlefield Earth, no one gripes about a supposed 245-minute version of The Cat in the Hat. But a quick Internet search will reveal endless web pages devoted to the missing scenes in Blade Runner, the 5-hour print of Apocalypse Now, and apparently the 212-minute cut of Battle of the Bulge. That tells you something. This 1965 war "classic" is a war film buff's The Third Man, Casablanca, or Some Like It Hot. It might not be the best WWII epic ever made (that honor, according to the same fans, is allotted to either The Longest Day, Patton, or Cross of Iron) but it is one of the most popular. Well, now we have a 170-minute cut of the film, and it's been heralded with a gorgeous DVD transfer. And you've got to wonder why.

Sure, there's a star-studded cast. Let's see, we've got: Henry Fonda, Robert Shaw, Dana Andrews, Robert Ryan, Telly Savalas, and Charles Bronson. And it is an epic. We're talking a cast of thousands with battle scene recreations that make modern warfare flicks pale in comparison. But when all the dust settles, Battle of the Bulge is a really long, really talky movie. And that's fine for history buffs, WWII film fans, and their ilk, but for the casual Friday night viewer it's a cure for insomnia.

Continue reading: Battle Of The Bulge Review

Jaws Review


Extraordinary
"You're gonna need a bigger boat."

It was the beast that launched a thousand monster movies. It was the film that sparked Spielberg's fame. The low strings on the soundtrack still strike terror in the hearts of millions. It has some of the most memorable lines of dialogue in the history of the movies. It's Jaws, and it's back with a 25th anniversary VHS and DVD. The consummate motion picture of any number of genres (monster, horror, fishing, etc.) Jaws is a true classic that should be owned and loved by any movie lover.

Continue reading: Jaws Review

Shriek If You Know What I Did Last Friday The 13th Review


Bad
At what point do self-awareness and flip irony double back and smack themselves in the face? The straight-to-cable Shriek If You Know What I Did Last Friday the 13th (it originally aired on USA Networks) is supposedly a parody of the teen horror genre, but considering the self-aware mockery of Scream, this film actually attempts to parody a parody. That is a daunting, thankless task which would require master parodists to pull it off. The makers of Shriek... are not those people.

Shriek's plot, as it were, is a stew of those from Scream and I Know What You Did Last Summer, centering around five students trying to avoid The Killer, a mysterious bungler in that now omnipresent Edvard Munch "The Scream" mask who knows embarrassing secrets about each of the students, including the fact that one student forgot to give her grandmother her laxative. Ha ha!

Continue reading: Shriek If You Know What I Did Last Friday The 13th Review

Robert Shaw

Robert Shaw Quick Links

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Berlin House Where David Bowie And Iggy Pop Lived Marked By Plaque

Berlin House Where David Bowie And Iggy Pop Lived Marked By Plaque

The flat at Hauptstrasse 155 was where Bowie and Iggy lived between 1976 and 1978 in the city, which inspired the so-called 'Berlin trilogy' albums.

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Rupert Grint To Star In TV Re-Make Of 'Snatch'

Rupert Grint To Star In TV Re-Make Of 'Snatch'

Grint will star alongside Dougray Scott and Ed Westwick in a 10-part TV series for Sony's streaming platform Crackle.

Coldplay Invite James Corden Onstage To Play Prince Tribute

Coldplay Invite James Corden Onstage To Play Prince Tribute

The Brits teamed up at the Hollywood Rose Bowl to perform a cover of The Purple One's 'Nothing Compares 2 U'.

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Robert Shaw Movies

Jaws Trailer

Jaws Trailer

When a girl leaving a beach party on Amity Island, New England goes for an...

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