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Manifest Your Destiny Toy Drive

Jeff Anderson-Gunther - Pure Perception presents the 6th Annual Manifest Your Destiny Toy Drive - Hollywood, California, United States - Monday 9th December 2013

Jeff Anderson and Gunther

To The Wonder Trailer


Neil is the subject of a cautionary tale about the dangers of falling in love. He thinks he has met the woman of his dreams when the European Marina flies over to the States to be with him. However, as beautiful and as perfect as their love seems, Neil can't stop seeing Jane; an old flame from the town he grew up in; as a spark is ignited between them once more. He becomes doubtful of his love life, and struggles to make sense of it while Father Quintana is equally struggling with his faith, unable to see past the pain and suffering in the world. Neil must understand that love is not perfect, nor is it easy in execution; you are at constant risk of failure, of betrayal and ultimately heartbreak. But love in its many forms is nonetheless a beauty, even if it can be unpredictable. 

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To the Wonder Review


Good

Frankly, a bad Terrence Malick film is better than 90 percent of movies released in cinemas: but if you thought The Tree of Life was indulgent and overly kaleidoscopic, you should avoid this like the plague. Because this film is even looser and more internalised, taking an impressionistic approach to plot and characters that gives us very few specifics. It also leaves the cast to play mere hints of people who are having crises of faith and love.

After a lushly romantic trip to Paris and Mont Saint-Michel, Neil (Affleck) brings his French girlfriend Marina (Kurylenko) and her 10-year-old daughter Tatiana (Chiline) home to Oklahoma to live. The geography and culture are a shock to both of them, but Marina tells Neil, "If you love me, I'm OK here." So they begin to bond as a family, and Marina turns to local Catholic priest Quintana (Bardem) for support. But he's having a crisis of faith, and she's wondering if she's made a terrible mistake. So when her visa expires, she takes Tatiana and returns to France. In confusion, Neil then turns to his old flame Jane (McAdams). But as their rekindled romance begins to get serious, she realises that he's still in love with Marina.

Malick tells this story with snippets of ideas and feelings. Emmanuel Lubezki's sumptuous cinematography finds raw beauty everywhere, including in Malick's trademark sun-dappled leaves, waving wheat fields and rippling water. But there's also raw beauty in the actors' faces, and we understand their thoughts through breathy voiceovers that offer philosophical musings and biblical texts. As a result, only Marina emerges as a properly defined character with passion and yearnings; everyone else is sketchy and vague. Even Affleck and Bardem, who have strong on-screen presence, never quite register here.

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Picture - Jeff Anderson Hollywood, California, Monday 20th October 2008

Jeff Anderson Monday 20th October 2008 Los Angeles Premiere of 'Zack and Miri Make A Porno' held at Grauman's Chinese Theater Hollywood, California

Jeff Anderson
Jeff Anderson
Jeff Anderson
Jeff Anderson
Jeff Anderson

Clerks II Review


Good
Kevin Smith is a deceptively good filmmaker. Often criticized for a filmic paralysis that has seen his style advance very little from the amateurish and unpolished production of the original Clerks, he has maintained a very plain and unaffected style of storytelling that serves him and us very well. In Clerks II, the plainness of his production lends the film an effortlessness and reality that compounds the humor of Smith's script and underscores the banality of the world he captures. The film has a relaxed pitch-perfect tone that gently draws you in before bitch-slapping you in the face with some of the most acerbically constructed, sporadically gut-busting, brilliant, base, and repulsive splotches of hilarity cinema has produced and probably wouldn't dare repeat.The story is suitably minimalist. Former mini-mall clerks Dante Hicks (Brian O'Halloran) and Randal Graves (Jeff Anderson) now work at Mooby's fast food restaurant. Randal spends his days badgering the customers and perpetual employee of the month Elias (Trevor Fehrman), an uber-Christian uber-nerd with a penchant for Peter Jackson. Dante has slightly more to do. Just as he is about to make the move to Florida with fiancé Emma (Jennifer Schwalbach) and begin a life he has been threatening to live for twelve years, he finds himself vacillating between his affections for Emma and his Mooby's manager Becky (Rosario Dawson). The story's tensions are these: Will Dante choose the woman he really loves? Will Randal realize his life is slipping away? Will Smith really show cinemagoers the special talents of Kinky Kelly? Of course, Jay (Jason Mewes) and Silent Bob (Kevin Smith) come along for the ride.Clerks II is, aside from its charm and tone, a very funny movie. The conceit of an under patronized fast food hellhole allows Smith's characters time and space to simply riff on anything and everything they like. Entrenched in the culture of internet blogging and talkback, Smith has crafted some fine and ultra-current dialogue for these diatribes. A heated conversation between Randal, Elias, and a customer, in which the battle between Star Wars and Jackson's Rings trilogy is contested, seems lifted from the pages of any of a countless number of film forums but laced with Smith's trademark zing. Randal, half huffy footballer and half super geek, is particularly hilarious at tearing shreds off Jackson's films. By the time he has concluded with "Even the trees walk in those movies!" I was gasping for breath. Other mirthful moments involve the buggery of donkeys, the fundamentals of "ass-to-mouth," and Jay's wonderfully oddball take on Silence of the Lambs' penis-tucking Buffalo Bill.Clerks II is elevated by an unsentimental heart always pulsing just beneath the surface of its irreverent movements. Smith's plain style captures the banality of his characters' lives -- the dirty floors, the rusting signs, the human imperfections -- and his dialogue turns away occasionally from obsessions with the body to matters of the soul. The dilemma Dante faces is very real and treated with delicate pathos in the script, and O'Halloran is effective as the conflicted clerk. At first I found him unsatisfactory as a romantic lead, his Ricky Gervais appearance and too-gentle demeanor not quite adding up to what I suspect Ms. Dawson might look for in a man. However, as the film progresses this becomes entirely the point. He is the everyman with the same kind of hidden heart as Smith's film. Anderson as Randal, the crook to O'Halloran's straight man, gives another performance that, whilst showy, is always believable.Newcomers Dawson and Fehrman fit well into Kevin Smith's New Jersey universe. Dawson is the precise piece of radiance required to light up the dull landscape and Fehrman, while perhaps the least believable character, certainly attacks the stereotype he plays with gusto. Clerks II is a fine balance between vulgarity and humanity that skimps on neither. Smith and his team should revel broadly at creating this appealing vignette of Jersey life and we can revel in watching it.Now that's a happy meal.

Clerks Review


Excellent
Ten years ago, independent filmmaker Kevin Smith got his start with this little film that has since become one of indie cinema's greatest inspirations. Made for the paltry sum of $28,000, Clerks is an incredible success that deserves its hype.

Clerks is a spectacular joyride. Filmed in 16mm black and white, the film packs in non-stop humor (and extreme profanity) from start to finish, as the story traces a day in the life of Dante (Brian O'Halloran), a twentysomething convenience store clerk still living with his parents.

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Twist of Faith Review


Good
About an hour into the documentary Twist of Faith, Tony Comes tells a dirty joke about priests and little boys. It's a crummy joke, and it's weird to watch him tell it - after all, he says he was molested by a priest when he was a teenager, as do the two men he's casually chatting with. But you want to laugh with them in sympathy -- the wisecracking obviously helps the men bond together and manage their grief. When the Catholic Church sex-abuse scandal first came to light in 2002, stories about victims soon blurred together, making it difficult to comprehend the extent of the psychic damage. Kirby Dick's film is a powerful corrective, then: by providing an intimate portrait of the emotional struggle of a single victim, Twist clarifies just how damaging the abuse is, and how easily it can contaminate others' lives.

Dick has a remarkably articulate and self-aware subject in Comes. A firefighter in his early 30s living in Toledo, Ohio, with his wife and two kids, Comes speaks candidly about how the alleged molester, Dennis Gray, brought him and his classmates up to a cottage retreat, plied them with alcohol, and raped them. He recalls Gray's offhand comments about how Comes was the sort of guy who'd screw up a wet dream. "Was this part of some conditioning process?" he wonders. "It screws with you." He's also keenly attuned to the sad ironies that his past has created in his adult life, like the fact that his drive to his therapist's office requires him to pass his old church. His wife, Wendy, was forced to adjust as well; she explains how Comes' past history has forced them to change the way they act in the bedroom, and indeed brought a level of neurosis to nearly everything they do.

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