Charles S Dutton

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The Perfect Guy Trailer


The idea of the perfect man doesn't always hold up entirely. Sometimes, a person can seem perfect on the surface - too perfect, in fact - and hold a deep, dark secret beneath. Leah Vaughn (Sanaa Lathan) discovers this when she finally leaves Dave (Morris Chestnut), her long-term boyfriend, because he isn't ready to commit to the idea of children. Dating begins, and she soon meets Carter Duncan (Morris Chestnut) who seems like the perfect man for her. But when she accidentally discovers his darker side, she does her best to get away from him, only to find herself pursued by a very dangerous suiter.

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Luv Trailer


Woody Watson is an 11-year-old boy with a broken family and an unpredictable future. His father is absent and his mother is in rehab leaving him to be cared for by his grandmother and recently out of prison uncle Vincent in their Baltimore home. His aspirations are questionable, admiring Vincent for his life of crime. One day, while Vincent is supposed to be taking Woody to school, he instead takes him out to the bank where he expected to be granted a loan for his food business. However, he is flatly refused based on his criminal past and he is forced to engage in one more drug dealing job for his ruthless boss Mr. Fish with young Woody looking on. When he witnesses his uncle falling into his violent past, he must choose what sort of life he wants to lead for what was meant to be a lesson in how to be man, has turned into a lesson in how to screw up your life like the rest of your family. Will Woody pick the right path?

'Luv' is the gritty drama based on how a broken family can force a child to admire the wrong sort of people and end up making them make life changing decisions at a very young age. It has been directed by Sheldon Candis ('Young Cesar') who also co-wrote the screenplay with Justin Wilson in his full length feature debut and is set to be released on November 9th 2012.

Directed by Sheldon Candis

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Picture - Charles S. Dutton , Thursday 13th September 2012

Charles S Dutton - Charles S. Dutton Thursday 13th September 2012 actor outside his Manhattan hotel with his luggage

Charles S Dutton
Charles S Dutton
Charles S Dutton
Charles S Dutton
Charles S Dutton

Picture - Charles S. Dutton Philadelphia, USA, Monday 16th August 2010

Charles S Dutton - Charles S. Dutton Philadelphia, USA - has lunch with a friends at Rouge restaurant Monday 16th August 2010

Charles S Dutton
Charles S Dutton
Charles S Dutton
Charles S Dutton

Legion Review


OK
There's nothing wrong with being preposterous, but this guilty pleasure thriller has a tendency to be pretentious as well. Despite a few winks at the camera, the emphasis on po-faced, nasty brutality wears rather thin.

The angel Michael (Bettany) has fallen from heaven, cut off his wings and armed himself to the teeth. Soon he's holed up in a remote desert diner run by Bob (Quaid) and his son Jeep (Black). Michael encourages the rag-tag group in the diner (including Gibson's shady tough guy, one-armed chef Dutton and bickering family Walsh, Tenney and Holland) to fight an invading horde of zombies, apparently sent by God to destroy humanity. And mankind's only hope is to save the unborn child of a waitress (Palicki) from the snarling angel Gabriel (Durand).

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Legion Trailer


Watch the trailer for Legion

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The Express Review


OK
Ernie Davis made the most of his too-brief life.

Football came naturally to the Pennsylvania native, and it was on the gridiron where he cemented his identity. A gifted running back, Davis was recruited by the great Jim Brown to play for coach Ben Schwartzwalder at Syracuse University. While an Orangeman, Davis earned MVP honors at the Cotton Bowl in 1960 and the Liberty Bowl in '61. Later that year, Davis became the first African-American to win the Heisman Trophy. The Washington Redskins used their first pick in the 1962 draft on Davis (though the team immediately traded him to the Cleveland Browns). But in 1963, before playing a single down in the National Football League, Davis died of leukemia at the age of 23.

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Honeydripper Review


Grim
Somewhere right about the time that blues great Keb' Mo' shows up as a blind guitarist named Possum who loves nothing more than to pick at his instrument and dispense homespun wisdom with a wry chuckle, it becomes clear that Honeydripper is not going to be anything close to the film that it should be. For sure, it would be near impossible, and probably not even advisable, for a filmmaker to totally eschew cliché when placing a film in as weighted a setting as John Sayles has done here. A small town in Alabama named Harmony, circa 1950, with a mean white sheriff, a lot of dirt-poor black folk, a bucolic landscape of thick green forests and insect-buzzed cotton fields, and plenty of porches to watch life go by from -- the blues is in the air. It's all the characters can do not to burst into choreographed song and dance.

As usual with Sayles, there's a hard knot of a good story here. The film is named for the town's Honeydripper Lounge, a ramshackle affair that serves up a good fried chicken affair but whose old blues singer can't compete with the jukebox R&B getting blasted by the competition down the street. Danny Glover plays the owner, Pine Top Purvis, a piano player with a violent past who's in debt to everyone in town and about out of chances. His last one is a New Orleans hot shot named Guitar Sam who's got a radio hit and is booked to play the Honeydripper on Saturday; only problem is, when the train shows up, Guitar Sam is nowhere to be found, even though Purvis has plastered the town with ads. The whole thing is a scramble, with Purvis frantically (well, not frantically, maybe busily; it is the old South, after all, and things take time) working every last hustle he can to stay ahead of the creditors and the corrupt sheriff (Stacy Keach, playing it more for laid-back humor than menace) who will shut him down if he can't find somebody who looks and plays like Guitar Sam to show up on Saturday. Maybe that handsome fella who just hopped off the train and is chatting up Purvis' daughter could do the trick...

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The L.A. Riot Spectacular Review


Grim
A film that works overtime to offend each and every ethnic group and economic class that makes up the smoggy purgatory of Los Angeles while simultaneously patting itself on the back for being so putatively daring, The L.A. Riot Spectacular is a cynical exercise in erstwhile satire that's all the more frustrating for the wasted opportunity it represents.

Like a series of linked MAD TV skits done without regard to network censors - the humor is about that intelligent - the film presents the 1992 Rodney King beating and subsequent riots as a grand comic opera of greed and stupidity, going after everybody involved with equal vigor. One can get a feel for how writer/director Marc Klasfeld intends to approach his subject a few minutes in, when the car chase and police beating of King (T.K. Carter) is done as a jokey game, with a police helicopter pilot serving as the announcer ("and they're off!"), while the cops themselves, having pulled King over, place beats over the ethnicity of the guy inside. Then Snoop Dogg shows up - serving, appropriately enough, as the film's narrator and chorus - to introduce the film proper, while fireworks go off behind him.

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Secret Window Review


Grim
Secret Window, the umpteenth film based on a Stephen King novella (Secret Window, Secret Garden), shares a striking resemblance to one of King's best films, Misery. This time around, the writer is held captive in his own home by an obsessed fan who insists he rewrite the ending to one of his novels. Sound familiar? After Window's first few scenes, it seems the film is destined to be a remix of its predecessor. Yet, what we ultimately receive in Window is a clear disappointment, not because it follows a familiar formula, but because it lacks the suspense and action so prevalent in King's novels.

The fan, John Shooter (John Turturro), believes novelist Mort Rainey (Johnny Depp) has plagiarized one of his novels. Shooter shows up at Rainey's rustic, upstate New York cabin ready to inflict whatever force necessary on Rainey until he admits to copying Shooter's work. Rainey is completely unprepared to deal with the situation. Rainey is struggling to come up with an idea for his latest novel and is dealing with the pain of his pending divorce to wife Amy (Maria Bello). When bad things start happening, Rainey immediately suspects Amy's home-wrecking boyfriend Ted (Timothy Hutton) could be the mastermind behind the madness. Rainey hires a private investigator (Charles S. Dutton) to sniff around the town, patrol his cabin at night, and conduct the investigative work Rainey himself is too lazy to do.

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Gothika Review


Weak
Having won her Oscar, banged Bond, played a superhero, and had her scrapes with the tabloids, there was only one glaring omission in Halle Berry's Hollywood resume (besides making her London theatrical debut), and that is: horror movie scream queen. Sure, Gothika's not Scream or Halloween 17: Chucky's Divorcee - there's a little more to it than that - but a good part of Ms. Berry's screen time is taken up with flailing her arms and screaming wildly while being pinned down by mental health aides and an injection-happy nurse. All in all, she's quite successful at it; this may not seem like the highest praise, but since you never quite know what kind of manure the studios are going to try and pass off as a horror or thriller flick these days, one has to lower the bar.

Gothika does its damn best to convince us that Berry, as Miranda Grey, is quite the serious prison therapist, sitting straight-faced through her sessions with insane convict Chloe Sava. (That's more than the audience can do, watching poor Penélope Cruz, as Chloe, actually try to act.) Dour-faced as she is, Grey seems to love her job, having a loving husband (Charles S. Dutton) as her boss at the women's prison, and a funny co-worker (Robert Downey Jr) who has a pretty serious crush on her. Then, driving home one rainy night, she crashes her car to avoid a girl standing in the rain. She then walks up to the crazed-looking girl, who then bursts into flames. Grey wakes up in one of the observation cells at the prison three days later, unsure if what happened was a dream, only to be told that she's been there three days and that she killed her husband.

Continue reading: Gothika Review

The L.A. Riot Spectacular Review


Grim
A film that works overtime to offend each and every ethnic group and economic class that makes up the smoggy purgatory of Los Angeles while simultaneously patting itself on the back for being so putatively daring, The L.A. Riot Spectacular is a cynical exercise in erstwhile satire that's all the more frustrating for the wasted opportunity it represents.

Like a series of linked MAD TV skits done without regard to network censors - the humor is about that intelligent - the film presents the 1992 Rodney King beating and subsequent riots as a grand comic opera of greed and stupidity, going after everybody involved with equal vigor. One can get a feel for how writer/director Marc Klasfeld intends to approach his subject a few minutes in, when the car chase and police beating of King (T.K. Carter) is done as a jokey game, with a police helicopter pilot serving as the announcer ("and they're off!"), while the cops themselves, having pulled King over, place beats over the ethnicity of the guy inside. Then Snoop Dogg shows up - serving, appropriately enough, as the film's narrator and chorus - to introduce the film proper, while fireworks go off behind him.

Continue reading: The L.A. Riot Spectacular Review

Against The Ropes Review


Grim
It's pretty rare that a movie's title describes the experience of viewing it. Against the Ropes is that uncommon example: You're on the losing end from the opening bell.

Scheduled to open last year, Against the Ropes is inspired by the life of boxing promoter Jackie Kallen (Meg Ryan). When we first meet Kallen, her career is going nowhere. She's stuck working for a Cleveland arena executive, who treats her like a nicer version of Kevin Spacey in Swimming with Sharks.

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Nick of Time Review


Weak
The experiment was this: Make an action/suspense movie that takes place in real time. That is, 90 minutes of film shows us 90 consecutive minutes in the lives of the hero and villains. Real time has been done before (see also Alfred Hitchcock's Rope, which is not only in real time, but has the appearance of being one continuous shot with no cuts). Real time has never been done quite like this.

In Nick of Time, director John Badham has taken a traditional three-act thriller and jammed it into a sparse 90 minutes. The plot follows accountant Gene Watson (Johnny Depp), now a single father of 7-year old Lynn (Courtney Chase). Arriving at Union Station in downtown Los Angeles, Gene and Lynn are picked from the crowd by the enigmatic Mr. Smith (Christopher Walken) for a devious task. Smith gives Gene a gun and a little over an hour to commit a murder or else his daughter will be killed. The catch? The target is the governor of California (Marsha Mason). Watson then has to balance the life of his daughter with the far-ranging conspiracy he finds himself caught up in. And time is running out.

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Charles S Dutton

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