Amber Valletta

Amber Valletta

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Amber Valletta at the 70th annual Cannes Film Festival photocall for the new movie 'Wonderstruck' - Cannes, France - Thursday 18th May 2017

Amber Valletta
Amber Valletta
Amber Valletta

Amber Valetta seen at Harper's Bazaar event Celebrating the 150 Most Fashionable Women of today held at the Sunset Tower Hotel - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 27th January 2017

Amber Valetta
Amber Valetta
Amber Valetta
Amber Valetta
Amber Valetta

Amber Valletta seen alone and with her husband Christian McCaw at a screening of Nocturnal Animals held at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 11th November 2016

Amber Valletta
Amber Valletta
Amber Valletta and Husband Christian Mccaw
Amber Valletta and Husband Christian Mccaw
Amber Valletta and Husband Christian Mccaw

Amber Valletta seen attending the CFDA Vogue party held at Chateau Marmont, Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 26th October 2016

Amber Valletta
Amber Valletta
Amber Valletta
Amber Valletta
Amber Valletta
Amber Valletta

Amber Valletta at the 23rd Annual ELLE Women in Hollywood Awards held at the Four Seasons Hotel, Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 25th October 2016

Amber Valletta
Amber Valletta
Amber Valletta
Amber Valletta
Amber Valletta
Amber Valletta

Video - Drew Barrymore Looks Sophisticated At NYC Ballet Gala - Part 4


'50 First Dates' star Drew Barrymore wore a glamorous black frock with laced sleeves and a sheer skirt as she posed for photos on the red carpet at the New York City Ballet 2013 Fall Gala held at the David H. Koch Theatre.

Continue: Video - Drew Barrymore Looks Sophisticated At NYC Ballet Gala - Part 4

Pictures: Hollywood Stars Turn Out For The LACMA Gala


Stanley Kubrick Cameron Diaz Evan Rachel Wood Robert Pattinson Will Ferrell Salma Hayek Tom Hanks Drew Barrymore Amber Valletta

One of the big events of the weekend was the LACMA Film + Art Gala which saw some of the great and good of Hollywood in attendance to raise a glass in honour of the director Stanley Kubrick and artist Ed Ruscha. Cameron Diaz, Evan Rachel Wood, Robert Pattinson, Will Ferrell and Salma Hayek were just some of the names there for the event which cost between $5000 and $10000 a ticket. 

Cameron Diaz At The LACMA Gala

Cameron Diaz looking radiant at the LACMA Gala

Continue reading: Pictures: Hollywood Stars Turn Out For The LACMA Gala

The Spy Next Door Trailer


Watch the trailer for The Spy Next Door

Continue: The Spy Next Door Trailer

Gamer Review


Bad
Bursting with their trademark visual style, Mark Neveldine and Brian Taylor (Crank) attack the screen with this twist on the virtual reality genre.

Unfortunately, the film is a cacophonous mess without a single interesting character.

In the nearish future, roleplay game-maker Ken Castle (Hall) has made his fortune with two games that let people live vicariously through others: the sex-and-party Society and the war-and-destruction Slayers. The twist is that the gamers are controlling actual people due to nano technology implanted in the performers' brains. In Slayers, they're all death row inmates firing real bullets, and the global megastar performer is Kable (Butler), controlled by rich geek Simon (Lerman). But Kable longs to escape and find his wife (Valletta), and a renegade hacker (Bridges) sets his escape in motion.

Continue reading: Gamer Review

Gamer Trailer


Watch the trailer for Gamer

Continue: Gamer Trailer

The Last Time Review


Bad
For the most part, the bad movies of today are bad for a common, if somewhat broad, reason. They exist merely as products. They neither entertain nor enlighten. They simply fuel the engine of commerce. (Imagine any recent Nicolas Cage or talking animal movie.) Their hackery and awfulness is conspicuous, often involving meaningless action, puerile humor, blaring pop songs, and an unconvincing story. The Last Time is a different sort of bad. It's bad on a much smaller scale. Its hackery and awfulness masquerade as intelligence and crafty storytelling. It doesn't exist to fuel the engine of commerce. It exists to pad the resume of everyone whose name appears in the credits.

Writer-director Michael Caleo clearly fancies himself a David Mamet acolyte. Like Mamet's Glengarry Glen Ross, The Last Time's plot centers on the vicious and primal world of high-pressure sales, and the dialogue comes out fast and caustic. Michael Keaton plays Ted, the top seller at a high-tech company whose product is frequently referred to but never actually defined. Ted is lonely, angry, and mean and he runs roughshod over everyone in his office, including his toothless boss, John (Daniel Stern). Ted is openly pissed off when he's directed to help orient the new guy, Jamie (Brendan Fraser). Everything changes, however, when Jamie introduces Ted to his gorgeous fiancée, Belisa (Amber Valletta). Ted takes an immediate interest in Belisa -- and his feelings only strengthen when he discovers that Belisa and Jamie aren't entirely happy together.

Continue reading: The Last Time Review

Dead Silence Review


Terrible

Dead Silence sucks. It's as simple as that. I like schlocky horror films as much as the next guy, but there's nothing to like about this one. Not one thing. Warming your hands over a burning ten-dollar bill is preferable to watching this film.

It's the sort of bad movie that makes you wonder how it emerged a winner from the studio production lottery. Surely a surplus of terrible ideas exists in Hollywood, so how did this particular steaming pile get made into a movie? I can't say for sure. The inner workings of Hollywood deal-making are beyond my expertise, so I'll confine my comments on Dead Silence to its general awfulness, resisting the urge to speculate on which member of the film's creative team kidnapped and held for ransom which studio executive's infant child -- the only possible explanation for green-lighting a movie this irredeemably bad. (Here's why: The filmmakers made the studio a lot of cash with the Saw series. -Ed.)

If you haven't seen the Dead Silence trailer, you may not know that the film centers on a murderous ventriloquist, whose spirit has risen from the dead, and an army of spooky dummies who do her bidding. It's hard to say whether director James Wan and screenwriter Leigh Wannell, both of whom are credited for dreaming up the story, were inspired by Chucky from the Child's Play movies or the scary clown doll from Poltergeist, but one thing is clear: Dead Silence possesses exactly zero ounces of originality. (The title sequence, for instance, is the filmic equivalent of plagiarism -- unrepentantly stealing from Steven Soderbergh's 2005 film, Bubble.)

The movie starts with some painfully awkward exposition followed by -- what else? -- a murder. One night James Ashen (Ryan Kwanten) and his wife, Lisa, discover a package containing a ventriloquist dummy left in front of their apartment door. Despite their foggy recollections of a ghost story from their childhood involving dummies and a psychotic ventriloquist who cuts out people's tongues, they don't think too much about the mysterious package. James goes to pick up some Chinese food and returns to find his wife dead, her tongue gruesomely removed and the doll lying in a heap next to her corpse. The detective assigned to the case, Jim Lipton (Donnie Walhberg), quickly fingers Ashen as the prime suspect, thus setting the wheels of plot in motion. With Lipton watching his every step, Ashen returns to his hometown to bury his wife and find the answer to her murder. He discovers that long ago a ventriloquist named Mary Shaw was killed by an enraged mob and ever since then certain families in the community have been killed off, one by one, each person's tongue ripped out by the avenging Mary Shaw and her legion of dummies.

In my movie-watching experience, I've seen Superman turn back time, zombies come to life, and Meg Ryan fall in love with Billy Crystal. And in each case, I was onboard, willing and eager to suspend my disbelief. That wasn't the case with Dead Silence. Wan and Wannell are determined not to acknowledge the inherent campiness of a movie featuring killer ventriloquist dummies and a spectral puppeteer. It's as if they think their grim refusal to address the obviously ridiculous makes it less so. Have they not seen the Scream movies? Do they know that self-awareness has been part of the horror genre for more than a decade now?

During the screening I attended, I fought off more than one urge to shake my fist at the screen. This is filmmaking at its wretched worst. At least Child's Play had a sense of humor. All Dead Silence has is dummies.

Now who's the dummy?

Premonition Review


OK
Forgive me for treading lightly through this Premonition review, but the last time I tried to discuss the film in detail, Sony reprimanded me.

The reason I find this so funny is because the out-of-order thriller consciously jumbles its supernatural narrative in an effort to dodge easy explanations. You're going to want to discuss possible theories with those who've seen it, which is exactly what I planned to do while working the Premonition press junket weeks ago.

Continue reading: Premonition Review

What Lies Beneath Review


Weak

Robert Zemeckis' self-indulgent direction hangs like an albatross around the celluloid neck of "What Lies Beneath," a soft-peddled yuppie horror flick that could have been -- with some fine tuning -- a sharp and genuinely scary thriller.

Forty minutes longer than necessary and featuring a cry-scream-and-run climax so drawn out that every ounce of tension evaporates from the screen half an hour before the credits roll, it's a frustrating movie to watch because of all the wasted potential.

Anything but a standard teens-in-peril slasher movie, "What Lies Beneath" stars Michelle Pfeiffer as a New England mom with empty nest syndrome after packing her daughter off to college in the opening scenes. Now alone in the house a lot, she becomes a busy body, spying on the new next door neighbors and witnessing what she thinks is a murder.

Continue reading: What Lies Beneath Review

The Family Man Review


OK

Nicolas Cage makes a gosh-darn good Jimmy Stewart substitute in "The Family Man," starring as a Wall Street playboy taught a lesson in life priorities when he gets Frank Capra-ed into an alternative suburban reality that includes a wife, kids, a minivan, a mortgage and a job selling tires for his father-in-law.

His performance is superb as Jack Campbell, a toplofty workaholic millionaire of the new economy who is utterly baffled by waking up one morning next to the college sweetheart (Téa Leoni), whom he'd abandoned to pursue his career 13 years before.

How did he get there? Well, after stiff-arming his ornamental girlfriend on Christmas eve and ordering an emergency merger meeting for dinner time the next day, Jack catches the eye of some kind of cryptic seraph (Don Cheadle) by intervening in a convenience store hold up. When he tells Cheadle he has everything he could ever want in life, the busybody celestial spirit decides Jack's karma needs a realignment and sends him whirling into a world of What Might Have Been.

Continue reading: The Family Man Review

Amber Valletta

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Amber Valletta Movies

The Spy Next Door Trailer

The Spy Next Door Trailer

Watch the trailer for The Spy Next DoorJackie Chan's character is a good guy who's...

Gamer Movie Review

Gamer Movie Review

Bursting with their trademark visual style, Mark Neveldine and Brian Taylor (Crank) attack the screen...

Gamer Trailer

Gamer Trailer

Watch the trailer for GamerGamer is set in the near future and the life of...

Dead Silence Movie Review

Dead Silence Movie Review

Dead Silence sucks. It's as simple as that. I like schlocky horror films as much...

Premonition Movie Review

Premonition Movie Review

Forgive me for treading lightly through this Premonition review, but the last time I tried...

The Transporter 2 Movie Review

The Transporter 2 Movie Review

Michael Bay, the reigning champ of crappy action films, once said, "I make movies for...

The Family Man Movie Review

The Family Man Movie Review

Just in time for Christmas comes a story worthy of both Ebenezer and Jimmy Stewart,...

Hitch Movie Review

Hitch Movie Review

Hitch asks one question: Just how far can a film coast on Will Smith's charm...

What Lies Beneath Movie Review

What Lies Beneath Movie Review

So far, this summer's supposed blockbusters could have used a free course on filmmaking from...

The Transporter 2 Movie Review

The Transporter 2 Movie Review

Few bad movies are more aggravating than a sequel that betrays everything which made its...

What Lies Beneath Movie Review

What Lies Beneath Movie Review

Robert Zemeckis' self-indulgent direction hangs like an albatross around the celluloid neck of "What Lies...

Max Keeble's Big Move Movie Review

Max Keeble's Big Move Movie Review

Even when presented with a reasonably original idea for a kids' movie like "Max Keeble's...

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