Timothy Hutton

Timothy Hutton

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Timothy Hutton - Timothy Hutton out and about in Beverly Hills at beverly hills - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Tuesday 2nd February 2016

Timothy Hutton
Timothy Hutton
Timothy Hutton
Timothy Hutton
Timothy Hutton
Timothy Hutton

Timothy Hutton - Disney/ABC Winter TCA Tour held at the Langham Huntington Hotel - Arrivals at The Langham Huntington Hotel, Disney - Pasadena, California, United States - Saturday 9th January 2016

Timothy Hutton
Timothy Hutton

Timothy Hutton - Disney/ABC Winter TCA Tour at the Langham Huntington Hotel - Arrivals at Langham Hotel - Pasadena, CA, Disney - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 10th January 2016

Timothy Hutton
Timothy Hutton
Timothy Hutton

Timothy Hutton - 67th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards held at the Microsoft theater - Arrivals at Microsoft Theatre, Primetime Emmy Awards, Emmy Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 20th September 2015

Timothy Hutton

Timothy Hutton - 67th Annual Emmy Awards at Microsoft Theatre at Microsoft Theatre, Emmy Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 20th September 2015

Timothy Hutton
Timothy Hutton

TNT To Axe 'Leverage' After Christmas Special


Timothy Hutton Christian Kane Beth Riesgraf Aldis Hodge

TNT has announced that it will be scrapping the popular show Leverage from the air when the current series comes to an end, on Christmas Day (Dec 25).

Leverage, which revolves around a crew of skilled swindlers who use their skills to fight corporate and governmental injustices inflicted on ordinary citizens, was cancelled on Friday (Dec 21) by the network amidst failing ratings, although the news that the show would be ending was announced some time before.

Dean Devlin, executive producer of the show, explained the situation to fans in an open letter released on December 6th on the fan website www.leveragefans.com. In the letter he writes: "As of the writing of this letter, we still do not know if there will be a season six of our show. Because of this uncertainty, [series creator] John Rogers and I decided to end this season with the episode we had planned to make to end the series, way back when we shot the pilot. So the episode that will air on Christmas is, in fact, the series finale we had always envisioned."

Continue reading: TNT To Axe 'Leverage' After Christmas Special

TNT To Cancel 'Leverage' After Five Seasons On Air


Timothy Hutton Christian Kane Beth Riesgraf Aldis Hodge

TNT announced today that it is planning to axe the show 'Leverage' from the air after five seasons, with the show ending with a Yuletide finale on Christmas Day.

The network confirmed the news that the drama, which follows a crack squad of highly skilled operatives who fight injustice by staging elaborate scams, will end on Christmas day with the episode, The Long Goodbye Job (10 p.m. ET/PT). What a fitting end.

In a statement made public earlier today (Dec 22), TNT told the press: "Leverage has thrilled audiences with its delightfully intricate plots, its 'stand up for the little guy' attitude and its terrific performances from stars Timothy Hutton, Gina Bellman, Christian Kane, Beth Riesgraf and Aldis Hodge. But after five wonderful years, it's time to say goodbye."

Continue reading: TNT To Cancel 'Leverage' After Five Seasons On Air

Lymelife Review


Good
Offbeat and funny but thoroughly realistic, this period drama explores issues of family, youth and social pressure through the eyes of a 15-year-old who's just starting to realise that people perhaps are more complicated than he ever imagined.

Scott (Rory Culkin) is a teen in 1980 Long Island, where his parents (Baldwin and Hennessy) are planning to build a new house while his meathead big brother (Keiran Culkin) is just back from basic training. He has a crush on his neighbour Adriana (Roberts), whose mother (Nixon) is failing to cope with the fact that her husband (Hutton) has Lyme disease. Both families are struggling with social mobility, marital stress and the tensions of the time they live in.

Not to mention some very bad decisions they make.

Continue reading: Lymelife Review

The Ghost [aka The Ghost Writer] Review


Excellent
Tightly wound and told without much fuss, this political thriller is captivating and often quite tense even though it doesn't seem to have much visual panache. But Polanski's fiendishly clever and extremely subtle touch is in every frame.

When a successful British ghost-writer (McGregor) is hired to clean up the memoirs of former Prime Minister Adam Lang (Brosnan), he can't quite believe the large paycheque heading his way. He soon relocates to an isolated island home in America to work with Lang, his wife (Williams) and assistant (Cattrall), but it quickly becomes clear that something fishy's going on here.

And maybe the scandalous news reports, about Lang's approval of torture in the War on Terror, are missing the real story.

Continue reading: The Ghost [aka The Ghost Writer] Review

The Ghost Trailer


Watch the trailer for The Ghost

Continue: The Ghost Trailer

Lymelife Review


Excellent
In Lymelife, Cynthia Nixon, as real estate agent Melissa Bragg in a New York suburb in 1979, looks skinny and a shade skanky, like an aging out-of-town version of a T. Rex groupie. And yet here she is in the real estate office trying to sell parcels in a housing development to people with from other countries. "It's the American Dream, Mr. Patel. On Long Island." Her boss, Mickey Bartlett (Alec Baldwin, he of the reptilian gaze and surface-to-air anger), is planning to become a millionaire in one year developing new homes in a place he calls Bartletown (what else?). And since they are next-door neighbors, the two are not so secretly engaged in schtupping one another. Mickey's wife Brenda (Jill Hennessy) is trying to tune him out but the song is getting monotonous. Melissa's husband Charlie (Timothy Hutton), spends his time in cheap gray bargain suits, sweating profusely and lurking in the basement, imaging that deer are trying to psychically commune with him. Charlie is slowly slipping away (possibly) to the effects of Lyme disease. Or he may just be another strung out sixties reject (he says the Lyme disease feels like "perpetual acid trip").

Lyme disease in the Long Island burb is the horror malady of the moment, as constructing new homes smack dab in the middle of the woods may be beautiful but it is also nightmarish. Radio announcers point out that Lyme disease causes psychiatric disturbances and severe mental disorders. Mothers weep at the thought of their kids contracting it and duct-tape the kiddies' clothing together to keep out the ticks. But if Lyme disease is the rampant contagion that all fear, it must have seeped into the residents' skulls and infected their brains. Because the only sensible parental character in Lymelife is Charlie, and he is obviously nuts.

Continue reading: Lymelife Review

Stephanie Daley Review


Very Good
As film subjects go, newborn death and its connections to the abortion debate are about as easy to approach as a pit of bible-carrying vipers. Though its plot comes straight from the Lifetime channel production line, the truth of the situation presented becomes more fleshed out and personal but nevertheless controversial to anyone who has followed similar stories on the nightly news. As one would guess, it's with careful steps that filmmaker Hilary Brougher takes on this subject in her sophomore effort Stephanie Daley.

Stephanie (Amber Tamblyn) was a good ol' religious girl before the whole rigmarole, spending Sunday morning at church looking after little kids while her parents (Jim Gaffigan and Melissa Leo) make small talk with the priest and other parishners. Being a sweet girl, her heart can't help but go out to the soldier-to-be who she meets at a friend's party. Sure enough, their quickie tryst ends with a bun in the oven and the boy nowhere to be found. Ultimately, Stephanie ends up giving birth on a school ski trip in a public toilet. The premature baby dies, leaving the world stunned and with nothing but questions galore.

Continue reading: Stephanie Daley Review

The Last Mimzy Review


Very Good
A mimzy -- to answer your burning question -- is a tattered, plush bunny stuffed with cotton and an alien nervous system that gives the doll artificial intelligence. Scientists from a dying future need a sample of good DNA, so they teleport the last of these rabbits to a Seattle beach in our present day, where precocious siblings Noah (Chris O'Neil) and Emma Wilder (Rhiannon Leigh Wryn) scoop the toy up and bring it home.

So begins Robert Shaye's pleasant adventure The Last Mimzy, inspired by Lewis Padgett's short story Mimsy Were the Borogoves, which should do for sci-fi exploration what Robert Rodriguez's Spy Kids franchise did for family espionage. The adults in Noah's life -- from his parents (Joely Richardson, Timothy Hutton) to his science teacher (Rainn Wilson) -- are too caught up in their daily routine to notice that the boy is changing. It isn't until Mimzy causes a citywide blackout that the military -- personified by Michael Clarke Duncan -- comes snooping around. The movie, at this point, begins to mimic E.T. without actually becoming its emotional equivalent.

Continue reading: The Last Mimzy Review

The General's Daughter Review


Bad

Only three or four minutes after the lights go down, any credibility "The General's Daughter" might have as a serious drama goes right out the window with the introduction of the title character.

At a retirement party for The General (James Cromwell), a military banquet hall is filled with brass honoring their commander. The camera searches row after row of stern-looking, spit-and-polish men before moving into a close-up of his daughter (Leslie Stefanson), a hot babe of the underwear model variety, smiling a centerfold smile and, except for her uniform, looking for all intents and purposes like she should be jumping out of a cake.

Forgoing the opportunity for a relatively realistic female officer portrayal like Demi Moore in "A Few Good Men," "The General's Daughter" asks us to believe that this porcelain blonde, who looks like she'd cry if she broke a nail, is not only an army captain but a doctor -- a shrink who instructs soldiers in the psychological warfare, no less.

Continue reading: The General's Daughter Review

Kinsey Review


Good

Writer-director Bill Condon has a talent for hitting just the right tone in his work. Whether he's paying stylistic homage to "Bride of Frankenstein" creator James Whale in "Gods and Monsters" or writing a screenplay for "Chicago" that re-envisioned the Broadway musical as a wannabe showgirl's uniquely cinematic daydream, Condon always finds a way to seamlessly marry the crux of his story to the strengths of his medium.

In "Kinsey," he legitimizes and revitalizes a rather tiresome narrative gimmick -- on-camera interviews with the characters. For a biopic about legendary sex researcher Alfred Kinsey, there could be no more apropos structure for the story. Kinsey himself interviewed thousands of Americans about their bedroom predilections in the 1940s and '50s to compile his groundbreaking, rather comprehensive and certainly controversial studies on the subject. So Condon opens the film in kind -- with a simple, head-on, black-and-white image of the bluntly matter-of-fact and obliviously awkward Professor Kinsey (Liam Neeson) being quizzed about his own background and sexual experience.

Composing the film around Kinsey's answers, Condon cues flashbacks of an upbringing under the fire-and-brimstone hand of a preacher father (John Lithgow), introduces the equally clinical-yet-passionate student who becomes his wife (Laura Linney), touches on the man's own pseudo-scientific dalliances and their promiscuous effect on his marriage, and sets the stage for the studies that helped launch the sexual revolution.

Continue reading: Kinsey Review

Timothy Hutton

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Timothy Hutton Movies

Lymelife Movie Review

Lymelife Movie Review

Offbeat and funny but thoroughly realistic, this period drama explores issues of family, youth and...

The Ghost [aka The Ghost Writer] Movie Review

The Ghost [aka The Ghost Writer] Movie Review

Tightly wound and told without much fuss, this political thriller is captivating and often quite...

The Ghost Trailer

The Ghost Trailer

Watch the trailer for The Ghost When the agent of a ghostwriter informs him of...

The Last Mimzy Movie Review

The Last Mimzy Movie Review

A mimzy -- to answer your burning question -- is a tattered, plush bunny stuffed...

The Good Shepherd Movie Review

The Good Shepherd Movie Review

Starting in the hot mess of the 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion, reaching back to...

Secret Window Movie Review

Secret Window Movie Review

Secret Window, the umpteenth film based on a Stephen King novella (Secret Window, Secret Garden),...

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