Steven Strait

Steven Strait

Steven Strait Quick Links

Pictures Video Film Comments RSS

Jeffrey Dean Morgan, Hilarie Burton

Steven Strait and Lynn Collins - Steven Strait, Lynn Collins Thursday 22nd March 2012 Jeffrey Dean Morgan, Hilarie Burton

Steven Strait and Lynn Collins

Jeffrey Dean Morgan, Hilarie Burton

Steven Strait, Christian Cooke, Danny Huston, Dominik Garcia-Lorido, Kelly Lynch and Mitch Glazer - Steven Strait, Dominik Garcia-Lorido, Christian Cooke, Kelly Lynch, Mitch Glazer, Elena Satine, Danny Huston Thursday 22nd March 2012 Jeffrey Dean Morgan, Hilarie Burton

Jeffrey Dean Morgan, Hilarie Burton

Steven Strait and Christian Cooke - Steven Strait, Christian Cooke Thursday 22nd March 2012 Jeffrey Dean Morgan, Hilarie Burton

Steven Strait and Christian Cooke

Starz Channel's 'Magic City' Premiere Event at the Academy Theatre - Arrivals

Steven Strait Thursday 22nd March 2012 Starz Channel's 'Magic City' Premiere Event at the Academy Theatre - Arrivals

Steven Strait

City Island Review


Good
This drama feels a little contrived due to the sheer number of issues faced by one family over a short period of time. But it's so refreshingly well-acted, with lively characters and some fairly outrageous situations, that it keeps us fully engaged.

Vince and Joyce (Garcia and Margulies) have a tempestuous but loving marriage, even though Vince has a couple of very big secrets. But then so do their son and daughter (Miller and Garcia-Lorido). First up is the fact that Vince has an adult son from an earlier relationship, Tony (Strait), whom he invites to live with the family without telling anyone who Tony really is. Including Tony.

Vince is also secretly taking acting lessons, and a fellow student (Mortimer) encourages him to go for a big audition. Which might be one secret too many.

Continue reading: City Island Review

City Island Trailer


Occasionally even close families keep secrets from one and other, the small white lies that most see as a necessary evil to keep a close bond and family dysfunctions at bay, but when these secrets inevitably come out, they cause more problems than they should.

Continue: City Island Trailer

10,000 B.C. Review


Grim
You'd think that with mammoths, saber-tooth tigers, and large, screeching birds you wouldn't need much more to deliver an entertaining romp through yester-epoch, but 10,000 B.C. proves that merely having an exotic setting as your premise won't get you over a mundane plot and more mundane characters.

The film begins with a blue-eyed girl coming to live with a clan of "manuk" (that's "mammoth" to you and me) hunters after her tribe is wiped out by what appear to be the bad guys from Conan the Barbarian. The tribe elder (Mona Hammond) declares that this girl is part of some prophecy while the son of the tribe's #1 hunter looks on.

Continue reading: 10,000 B.C. Review

The Covenant Review


Unbearable
If nothing else, The Covenant is a testament to successful -- albeit misleading -- advertising. From the trailers, The Covenant looks like a sexy supernatural thriller, a cross between The Craft and The Lost Boys, about four attractive young men -- born from a family of witches -- with extraordinary powers, who must confront an ancient rival right before their 18th birthday. Pretty cool, huh?

Upon father investigation, we learn the MPAA rated The Covenant PG-13 for "intense sequences of violence and action, some disturbing images, sexual content, partial nudity and language." What more can you ask for in a guilty pleasure? With alleged intense action, sex appeal, and supernatural qualities, The Covenant just has to be a treat for the senses--right?

Continue reading: The Covenant Review

Sky High Review


Weak
The high school melodrama gets feebly super-charged in Sky High, a tween-oriented Disney adventure made from the spare parts of Harry Potter, Spy Kids, X-Men and '80s teen romances like Some Kind of Wonderful. Without an original bone in its mutant body, Mike Mitchell's decidedly mortal misfire - too childish and metaphorically shallow to appeal to serious comic book fans, and too prosaic to strike a chord with those weaned on Pixar's far more exhilarating The Incredibles - is a misguided movie in search of a suitable identity. While cheery, colorful, and buoyant as Superman on a nighttime flight around Metropolis, this humdrum escapade nonetheless lacks any sign of an extraordinary imagination. An example of bland mix-and-match derivativeness, the film's espousals of egalitarianism not only promote the values of tolerance and cross-cultural harmony, but also wind up functioning as a preemptive validation for its own mild, middle-of-the-pack mundaneness.

Will Stronghold (Michael Angarano) is the son of the world's greatest heroes, super-strong Captain Stronghold (Kurt Russell) and high-flying Josie Jetstream (Kelly Preston). However, despite his impressive lineage, Will's lack of astonishing abilities poses complications on his first day at Sky High, a Hogwarts-esque floating academy for exceptionally gifted teens. Because of his embarrassing ordinariness, Will is shuttled into the "Sidekick" academic track (euphemistically referred to as "Hero Support") with his hippie best friend Layla (Danielle Panabaker) and other lamely powered misfits. Sidekicks are unpopular geeks and Heroes are the cool kids at this fantastic high school, which also features a cheerleading squad made up of clones, a mixed-lineage (hero and villain) rebel as Will's brooding arch-nemesis, and bullies acting as evil henchmen for a mysterious fiend who's plotting revenge against the Stronghold clan. This passing interest in metaphorical subtext proves tantalizing during Will's admission to his dad that he's a sidekick (a moment that recalls X-Men 2's "coming out" scene), as well as with the repeated adult refrain that Will is just a "late bloomer" (thus linking his nascent strengths with puberty). Yet content to only skim the surface of its symbolic potential, the film doggedly opts for obviousness when subtlety is called for, ultimately turning its story into simply the latest misfit-makes-good-and-proves-that-dorks-are-people-too adolescent fairy tale.

Continue reading: Sky High Review

Undiscovered Review


Terrible
Watch enough movies and after a while you learn a few things. Here's one important lesson: When the number of ushers assigned to a theater showing a movie is greater than the number of people actually watching the movie, you're in trouble. For Undiscovered, the final count during this reviewer's public screening: Ushers 3; Audience Members 1.

This underwhelming romantic drama set against the backdrop of L.A.'s rock music scene doesn't break that rule. Oddly enough, what dooms the movie is its strict adherence to two overused story tactics, "a star is made; a star is destroyed" and "the missed opportunity" romance. Predictably, the results are not pleasant and ushers nationwide will have an easy time cleaning gum and cola off the floors.

Continue reading: Undiscovered Review

Undiscovered Review


Unbearable

He's a sexy young struggling musician who never has to struggle. She's an aimless young model who wants to be an actress but never goes on auditions. Apparently, they're meant for each other, but just too stupid, young and shallow to let it happen without a lot of soap-operatic fuss.

So can somebody please tell me why we're supposed to care about these one-dimensional MTV-spawned caricatures in "Undiscovered"? Writer John Galt and director Meiert Avis sure haven't offered any clues.

Hunky, pouty Luke (Steven Strait, "Sky High") and boney, peppy Brier (Pell James) dance around each other through the whole picture, but he's busy trolling around with vapid models as his star rises during pedestrian music-video montage sequences, and she refuses to date any more musicians, having been recently suckered by a transparently scummy British rock star from Central Casting.

Continue reading: Undiscovered Review

Steven Strait

Steven Strait Quick Links

Pictures Video Film Comments RSS
Advertisement

Suggested

The Lobster - Trailer

The Lobster - Trailer

'The Lobster' is a peculiar black comedy exploring romance in the most abstract way possible.

Awards Season Kicks Off With Venice Film Festival 2015

Awards Season Kicks Off With Venice Film Festival 2015

Get ready for the likes of 'Everest', 'The Danish Girl' and 'Black Mass'.

Swim Deep - Namaste Video

Swim Deep - Namaste Video

Paul Daniels stars as a quiz show host in the video for Swim Deep's new song 'Namaste', taken from their second album 'Mothers'.

The 5th Wave - Trailer

The 5th Wave - Trailer

This sci-fi disaster movie is based on the bestselling 2013 novel of the same name by Rick Yancey.

Advertisement
A Walk In The Woods Gives Robert Redford A New Old Friend

A Walk In The Woods Gives Robert Redford A New Old Friend

He loved the 'undisciplined' side to co-star Nick Nolte.

The Transporter Refuelled Puts Ed Skrein In The Spotlight

The Transporter Refuelled Puts Ed Skrein In The Spotlight

The actor insists he felt comfortable in his new role.

Nickelodeon Planning On Reviving Some Of Their 90s Classics, Could ‘The Rugrats’ Or ‘Hey Arnold’ Return To Our Screens?

Nickelodeon Planning On Reviving Some Of Their 90s Classics, Could ‘The Rugrats’ Or ‘Hey Arnold’ Return To Our Screens?

Nickelodeon has announced it is planning on reviving some of its popular 1990s shows in “a fresh new way”.

Spielberg Believes Superhero Movies Have A Shelf Life

Spielberg Believes Superhero Movies Have A Shelf Life

The director thinks that the superhero style will go the "way of the Western".

Advertisement