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Alec James Stewart - Football Writers' Association Tribute Dinner to honour José Mourinho - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 19th January 2014

James Stewart

Paramount Aim To Prevent 'It's A Wonderful Life' Sequel From Happening


James Stewart

It was announced this week that, after more than 60 years since its original release, a sequel to the beloved Christmas film It's A Wonderful Life was in the works. This looked to be the case, until Paramount stepped in and said that they will do whatever is in their powers to prevent a follow-up to the 1946 film from happening.

It's A Wonderful Life
The 1946 classic is loved by generations

Paramount own the full rights to the classic festive tale and on Wednesday, 20 November, the studio released a statement saying that they have no intentions of selling the rights to the film, adding that no sequel can be made without permission from them. According to Entertainment Weekly, the studio said in their statement that no one has enquired into purchasing the rights to the film, adding that they would probably get turned down it they tried.

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'It's A Wonderful Life' Sequel In The Works: Big Mistake?


James Stewart

Treasured 1940s Christmas movie It's A Wonderful Life apparently has a sequel in the works, set to be released nearly 60 years after the original 1946 film. Described as "one of the most beloved films ever made" by our own Christopher Null, the movie has earned its place as one of the most cherished festive films that spans generations.


Continue reading: 'It's A Wonderful Life' Sequel In The Works: Big Mistake?

Picture - Jessica Marais; James Stewart Sydney, Australia, Sunday 14th November 2010

James Stewart - Jessica Marais; James Stewart Sydney, Australia - The 2010 Inside Film IF Awards held at City Recital Hall Sunday 14th November 2010

Picture - James Stewart and Alexandra Paul Los Angeles, California, Monday 21st July 2008

James Stewart and Alexandra Paul - James Stewart and Alexandra Paul Los Angeles, California - Outfest film festival closing night held at the Orpheum Theatre. Monday 21st July 2008

The Spirit of St. Louis Review


Good
Charles Lindbergh and Jimmy Stewart -- "Americana" doesn't have a better definition than these two larger-than-life characters. The film is a straightforward tale of the making of Lucky Lindy, focusing on his 1927 Trans-Atlantic flight from New York to Paris, 33 1/2 harrowing hours that inaugurated the era of flight. Billy Wilder's movie isn't particularly daring in its telling, but as a piece of American -- and world -- history, The Spirit of St. Louis is something everyone should see.

It's a Wonderful Life Review


Excellent
Come now, what on earth am I going to say about one of the most beloved films ever made? Something about how it was originally coined on a Christmas Card? About how a clerical error resulted in it not being copyrighted and contributing to its ubiquity on television -- since it was royalty-free? Or should I just go ahead and tell the few people on earth who haven't seen it what it's all about.

Okay kids, if you don't have a TV, It's a Wonderful Life tells us about George Bailey (Jimmy Stewart), who lives and loves his small town of Bedford Falls so much he'd die for it. And sure enough, when his tiny Building & Loan (aka bank) starts to fail -- thanks to the malicious influence of the local tycoon (Lionel Barrymore) -- George heads for his local bridge to end it all.

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The Flight of the Phoenix (1965) Review


Excellent
This exciting and underseen film features James Stewart at the top of his late-career game, offering the far-fetched yet strangely compelling tale of a group of air crash survivors who, trapped in the Sahara Desert and with no other options in sight, decide to build a miniature plane out of the giant air hulk they crashed in. Sure, the odds of crashing your plane with a flotilla of tools, jet fuel, pressed dates, and a welding apparatus -- but without a working radio or much water -- isn't exactly believable, but somehow director Robert Aldrich (The Dirty Dozen) makes it work, and work well. Will this bizarre contraption really work? It's two and a half nail-biting hours during which personalities violently crash, schemes are hatched, and a career-making secret is revealed.

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You Can't Take It with You Review


Essential
Jimmy Stewart's legendary career was just beginning when he co-starred in this Frank Capra classic, a warm, heart-tugging Best Picture Oscar winner. Based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning Broadway show by Kaufman and Hart, Capra's entry captures a wacky extended family living together in post-Depression USA, devoting all their efforts to their favorite pastimes with a smiling middle finger to societal expectations and demands.

The joy nearly leaps off the screen and begs you to join. In a charming introduction, family patriarch Grandpa Vanderhof (Lionel Barrymore, on crutches due to arthritis) meets a mousy accountant named Poppins (the appropriately named Donald Meek), a dreamer who'd rather make toys than punch meaningless numbers all day. With a simple tease of what could be, Vanderhof convinces his newfound friend to toss it all away and live with his family. And poof, as Poppins says, "the die is cast."

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The Cheyenne Social Club Review


Good
What to expect of a film titled The Cheyenne Social Club, starring Jimmy Stewart and directed by Gene Kelly? Certainly not a semi-comedy about a roughneck who inherits a whorehouse from his brother. This western oddity is a sort of feel-good rendition of Unforgiven, with less of a body count. When poor, yokelish Jimbo inherits the titular "social club," he's at a loss of what to do. Obviously working the skin trade is not quite his bag, and seeing a classic nice guy like Stewart handle this moral crisis is quite amusing, at least for a while. Ultimately the film is pretty fluffy, but it's not the worst western I've seen by far.

The Glenn Miller Story Review


OK
Jimmy Stewart gives a promising performance in a film that starts off great and quickly descends into unfortunate boredom. The big problem? Glenn Miller just wasn't that interesting a character. Aside from the fact that he basically ordered his girlfriend (then engaged to another man) to take a train across the country and marry Miller instead, there's not much new to this up-from-poverty-to-famous-composer/musician story. The entire last half concerns Miller's work as a bandleader in the military (which is, I suppose, important since he died during World War II), but the very worst scene comes earlier in the film, when Miller and best gal Helen (June Allyson) visit a jazz club: The entire scene is filmed through a spinning color wheel. It may be the worst directorial decision in the history of movies.

The Shop Around the Corner Review


Excellent
Very cute and clever love/hate story, set in 1930s Budapest (for some reason), about a pair of store employees who fall in love over a pen pal correspondence, but despise each other in real life. Funny and timeless. Jimmy Stewart is fantastic.

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The Rare Breed Review


Weak
One of the strangest westerns I've ever seen, this story of a rare cow and its treacherous delivery eventually gives way to a character study featuring James Stewart, Maureen O'Hara, and the unforgettable Brian Keith, playing an outrageous Scotsman. It never really goes anywhere -- and it couldn't: Most of the film was shot on a sound stage instead of on location.

You Can't Take It with You Review


OK
Jimmy Stewart and Jean Arthur come together in Frank Capra's third and final Best Director effort, You Can't Take It With You, a movie which is amusing, but unfortunately ends up as one of his least enduring efforts. Overlong and underplotted, the film concerns two young lovers who finally endeavor to introduce their families to one another. As usual, Capra attempts to pillory big business, but the effort here is half-baked and overshadowed by slapstick antics between the two families. A Best Picture winner in 1938, the movie isn't aging well and can be suitably replaced by pretty much any of Capra's other works.

After The Thin Man Review


Good
Possibly a bit better than the original Thin Man, aided by an even drier script and the appearance of James Stewart (though in a bit of a strange role). It's more hijinks for Nick and Nora this time around, as they return home to San Francisco and get caught up in a murder mystery, which even lands Nora in the pokey. Cute, though like its predecessor, more than a little dated.
James Stewart

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