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James Stewart , Zoey Kay - London Cabaret Club launch - Arrivals at Cabaret Club - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 4th May 2016

James Stewart and Zoey Kay
James Stewart and Zoey Kay

Alec James Stewart - Football Writers' Association Tribute Dinner to honour José Mourinho - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 19th January 2014

James Stewart
James Stewart

Paramount Aim To Prevent 'It's A Wonderful Life' Sequel From Happening


James Stewart

It was announced this week that, after more than 60 years since its original release, a sequel to the beloved Christmas film It's A Wonderful Life was in the works. This looked to be the case, until Paramount stepped in and said that they will do whatever is in their powers to prevent a follow-up to the 1946 film from happening.

It's A Wonderful Life
The 1946 classic is loved by generations

Paramount own the full rights to the classic festive tale and on Wednesday, 20 November, the studio released a statement saying that they have no intentions of selling the rights to the film, adding that no sequel can be made without permission from them. According to Entertainment Weekly, the studio said in their statement that no one has enquired into purchasing the rights to the film, adding that they would probably get turned down it they tried.

Continue reading: Paramount Aim To Prevent 'It's A Wonderful Life' Sequel From Happening

'It's A Wonderful Life' Sequel In The Works: Big Mistake?


James Stewart

Treasured 1940s Christmas movie It's A Wonderful Life apparently has a sequel in the works, set to be released nearly 60 years after the original 1946 film. Described as "one of the most beloved films ever made" by our own Christopher Null, the movie has earned its place as one of the most cherished festive films that spans generations.


Continue reading: 'It's A Wonderful Life' Sequel In The Works: Big Mistake?

James Stewart - Jessica Marais; James Stewart Sydney, Australia - The 2010 Inside Film IF Awards held at City Recital Hall Sunday 14th November 2010

James Stewart

James Stewart and Alexandra Paul - James Stewart and Alexandra Paul Los Angeles, California - Outfest film festival closing night held at the Orpheum Theatre. Monday 21st July 2008

James Stewart and Alexandra Paul

The Spirit Of St. Louis Review


Very Good
Charles Lindbergh and Jimmy Stewart -- "Americana" doesn't have a better definition than these two larger-than-life characters. The film is a straightforward tale of the making of Lucky Lindy, focusing on his 1927 Trans-Atlantic flight from New York to Paris, 33 1/2 harrowing hours that inaugurated the era of flight. Billy Wilder's movie isn't particularly daring in its telling, but as a piece of American -- and world -- history, The Spirit of St. Louis is something everyone should see.

It's A Wonderful Life Review


Excellent
Come now, what on earth am I going to say about one of the most beloved films ever made? Something about how it was originally coined on a Christmas Card? About how a clerical error resulted in it not being copyrighted and contributing to its ubiquity on television -- since it was royalty-free? Or should I just go ahead and tell the few people on earth who haven't seen it what it's all about.

Okay kids, if you don't have a TV, It's a Wonderful Life tells us about George Bailey (Jimmy Stewart), who lives and loves his small town of Bedford Falls so much he'd die for it. And sure enough, when his tiny Building & Loan (aka bank) starts to fail -- thanks to the malicious influence of the local tycoon (Lionel Barrymore) -- George heads for his local bridge to end it all.

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The Flight Of The Phoenix (1965) Review


Excellent
This exciting and underseen film features James Stewart at the top of his late-career game, offering the far-fetched yet strangely compelling tale of a group of air crash survivors who, trapped in the Sahara Desert and with no other options in sight, decide to build a miniature plane out of the giant air hulk they crashed in. Sure, the odds of crashing your plane with a flotilla of tools, jet fuel, pressed dates, and a welding apparatus -- but without a working radio or much water -- isn't exactly believable, but somehow director Robert Aldrich (The Dirty Dozen) makes it work, and work well. Will this bizarre contraption really work? It's two and a half nail-biting hours during which personalities violently crash, schemes are hatched, and a career-making secret is revealed.

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You Can't Take It With You Review


Essential
Jimmy Stewart's legendary career was just beginning when he co-starred in this Frank Capra classic, a warm, heart-tugging Best Picture Oscar winner. Based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning Broadway show by Kaufman and Hart, Capra's entry captures a wacky extended family living together in post-Depression USA, devoting all their efforts to their favorite pastimes with a smiling middle finger to societal expectations and demands.

The joy nearly leaps off the screen and begs you to join. In a charming introduction, family patriarch Grandpa Vanderhof (Lionel Barrymore, on crutches due to arthritis) meets a mousy accountant named Poppins (the appropriately named Donald Meek), a dreamer who'd rather make toys than punch meaningless numbers all day. With a simple tease of what could be, Vanderhof convinces his newfound friend to toss it all away and live with his family. And poof, as Poppins says, "the die is cast."

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The Cheyenne Social Club Review


Very Good
What to expect of a film titled The Cheyenne Social Club, starring Jimmy Stewart and directed by Gene Kelly? Certainly not a semi-comedy about a roughneck who inherits a whorehouse from his brother. This western oddity is a sort of feel-good rendition of Unforgiven, with less of a body count. When poor, yokelish Jimbo inherits the titular "social club," he's at a loss of what to do. Obviously working the skin trade is not quite his bag, and seeing a classic nice guy like Stewart handle this moral crisis is quite amusing, at least for a while. Ultimately the film is pretty fluffy, but it's not the worst western I've seen by far.

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance Review


Very Good
James Stewart and Lee Marvin square off in The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, the Citizen Kane of westerns -- about a Senator (Stewart) from the old west who returns who for the funeral of an old cowboy friend (the inimitable John Wayne), whereupon he is quizzed about his rise to power as a politician, thanks to his slaying of the evil highwayman Liberty Valance (Marvin). What follows is an unraveling of the legend behind the infamous shootout, when Stewart's pantywaist lawyer somehow outdid the rough-and-tumble villain.

A classic John Ford film (and one of the last black and white westerns to be made), Wayne and Stewart make a great Odd Couple in the podunk town of Shinbone. Unfortunately, the middle of the film sags under the overly patriotic history lessons we are given when Stewart takes it upon himself to teach the locals how to read and write. The ensuing fight for statehood isn't much better, except when Valance comes a-knockin'.

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Rope Review


Extraordinary
Along with The Birds and Psycho, Rope was one of the very first Hitchcock films I saw as a kid -- a dusty old videotape sitting on a shelf with an odd title scrawled on its edge. I loved it then and still have a fond memory for the film, which led me to explore nearly 50 pictures from the Master of Suspense.

Rope is a complex and dazzlingly unique picture. Subversively based on the Leopold and Loeb murder case, it presents us with two boys (Dall and Granger) who have been taught by their old headmaster (Stewart) in the Nietzchian philosophies of the Superman and the unimportance of the lives of simpler people. Dall masterminds a plot and Granger follows as his half-willing pull-toy; together they strangle a mutual friend, dump his body in a chest, and throw a party for his father -- serving a buffet from his makeshift casket.

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Call Northside 777 Review


Good
Not a movie about an air crisis, a police station, or a military action (as the title would seem to indicate), Call Northside 777 is actually one of the most mundane legal thriller/newspaperman activist stories the world has ever seen. The title, as is fitting, refers to a phone number in the movie.

James Stewart seriously runs away with this movie. As skeptical reporter P.J. McNeal, he's tasked with writing a story about a convicted cop killer, 11 years after he's been put away for life. As he investigates, he slowly encounters piece after piece of evidence which exonerates the man -- yet the corrupt Chicago legal and police system won't hear any of it. Based on a true case in 1932, Call Northside 777 was also the first film shot on location in Chi-town.

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James Stewart Movies

It's a Wonderful Life Movie Review

It's a Wonderful Life Movie Review

Come now, what on earth am I going to say about one of the most...

Advertisement
Rope Movie Review

Rope Movie Review

Along with The Birds and Psycho, Rope was one of the very first Hitchcock films...

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