Cathy Moriarty

Cathy Moriarty

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Disney On Ice presents 'Frozen'

Cathy Moriarty and children - Disney On Ice presents 'Frozen' at The Barclay's Center in Brooklyn - Arrivals at Barclays Center, Disney - New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 11th November 2014

Cathy Moriarty
Cathy Moriarty
Cathy Moriarty

Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Legends VIP Night

Cathy Moriarty and and Family - Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey presents Legends VIP night at Barclays Center - New York City, New York, United States - Thursday 20th February 2014

Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey circus

Cathy Moriarty - Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey circus presents 'Built To Amaze!' at the Barclays Center - New York City, New York, United States - Thursday 21st March 2013

Cathy Moriarty and and Family
Cathy Moriarty and and Family

Picture - Cathy Moriarty , Tuesday 10th April 2012

Cathy Moriarty Tuesday 10th April 2012 'To The Arctic' Special Screening at AMC Lincoln Square

Cathy Moriarty

Picture - Cathy Moriarty, and Family , Tuesday 10th April 2012

Cathy Moriarty - Cathy Moriarty, and Family Tuesday 10th April 2012 'To The Arctic' Special Screening at AMC Lincoln Square

The Bounty Hunter Review


OK
Aniston and Butler mysteriously rustle up just enough chemistry in this simplistic rom-com to make it enjoyable. We never really like their characters, but some of the film's contrived situations are genuinely funny.

Nicole (Aniston) is a New York journalist who's so busy with a breaking story that she neglects to turn up for a court date and ends up on the bail-jumper list of bounty hunter Milo (Butler), her ex-husband. Their stormy marriage didn't last long, and Milo is happy for the chance to get some revenge. But he's being chased by the goons (Coster and Garland) of an Atlantic City loan shark (Moriarty). Meanwhile, Nicole also has a lovelorn colleague (Sudeikis) and a vicious henchman (Greene) after her.

Continue reading: The Bounty Hunter Review

Digging To China Review


Terrible
Kevin Bacon as a retarded man? You may not buy the acting, but you'll believe it as fact when you see the debacle he throws out in this hackneyed, awful film (retarded man befriends naive young girl). This ain't no Gilbert Grape, that's for sure. Avoid.

Crazy In Alabama Review


Grim
This bizarrely incoherent tale set in the segregated South mixes two stories as well as oil and water. One follows Melanie Griffith's neo-psychotic widow on a cross-country trip with her husband's decapitated head along for the ride. The second follows her nephew's quest to integrate a small town in Alabama. The only thing scarier than Griffith's black fright wig is the "directed by Antonio Banderas" credit. Talk about crazy.

Gloria (1999) Review


Unbearable
A shocking must-avoid. Sharon Stone at her worst (and that's bad!). An awful, ill-conceived idea, remade from an equally bad 1980 John Cassavetes film by the same name. None of these phrases quite gets across the horror that is Gloria, a film that has to resort to Sharon Stone's cleavage to move copies of the video (see the box cover if you don't believe me). Sadly, said cleavage is -- by far -- the best part of this film, a pedestrian remake of a Cassavetes movie regarding a brazen, New Yoikah ex-con (Stone "If yah evah luvved me...") and her charge, a little boy on the run from the mob. Yech.

Casper Review


OK
Girl meets ghost. Ghost wants to become real to get girl. The live-action version of the classic cartoon doesn't have much to mention aside from some nifty effects and a story lifted from Cinderella. Christina Ricci is always fun to look at, even when she's seen working in her Disneyesque postpubescent era. Fun for kids, I suppose, but hardly worth mentioning otherwise.

Cop Land Review


Grim
Cop Land was supposed to do for Sylvester Stallone what Pulp Fiction did for John Travolta. Alas, the movie was (rightly) ignored by audiences and shrugged off by critics, thanks to an almost complete lack of anything so much as resembling a compelling story.

The plot is so simple as to defy description: A lot of New York cops live across the water in Jersey, and it turns out they are all beholden to the mob. It's up to fat, half-deaf Sheriff Freddy (Sly) to expose this atrocity!!! Would that there were more to say, Cop Land builds its "mystery" by simply not telling you what's going on. Only after an hour or so do you piece together the whole mob angle, and then the audience realizes, "Hey, there's nothing happening here!" Note to Mangold: Watch L.A. Confidential a few times if you want to see how clever plot structure goes, not to mention throwing in a little wit here and there.

Continue reading: Cop Land Review

But I'm A Cheerleader Review


Grim
Take director John Waters and give him a really good actress like Natasha Lyonne, a paltry budget of, say, $1 million, and ask him to make a satire about a "gay rehab camp," and you might come up with something like But I'm a Cheerleader.

Then again, Waters might have come up with something funny, like Pecker. With such a meaty topic as Family Values ripe for a send-up, you'd think it would be easy to milk Cheerleader for comic value. Unfortunately, first-time feature director Jamie Babbit (whose few credits including directing the MTV series Undressed and acting as script supervisor on The Game) doesn't appear to have much ability behind the camera, which becomes painfully apparent after only a few minutes.

Continue reading: But I'm A Cheerleader Review

Runaway Daughters Review


Unbearable
Looking at the talent lined up for Runaway Daughters, I can only assume the whole affair is an elaborate joke that no one ever got.

This is a bad movie, folks, and here's why.

Continue reading: Runaway Daughters Review

Raging Bull Review


Essential
Twenty-five years since its release, Martin Scorsese's masterpiece Raging Bull has been crowned with so many critical laurels that another word in praise of it might seem hopelessly redundant. To claim that it puts to shame virtually any American film made since sounds about right, but it might be more worthwhile to note how the film showcases Scorsese's artistic genius in its purest form -- unsullied by ego, commercial pressures, or the self-doubt that can cloud a more jaded artist's vision. Raging Bull is a work of religious devotion by a filmmaker to his craft and an apotheosis of Scorsese's promise.

The film charts the life and career of boxer Jake LaMotta (Robert De Niro) from his rise to glory in the 1940s to his fall into washed-up grotesquery in the '50s, a lounge lizard parody of his former self. That LaMotta turns into the very sort of schmuck, fat-bellied and dissipated, that he would've abhorred in his youth marks one of Scorsese's most poignant treatments of his trademark theme of the individual struggling to transcend his worst instincts to achieve greatness and grace. Anger and bitterness are ever-present here, either churning at the film's surface or roiling just below in slow burn. LaMotta, the insecure hothead who chafes at the underworld hoods who've ensnared him, directs his rage outward in the form of sexual jealousy at his wife, Vickie (Cathy Moriarty), and through his tornado-like fury in the ring. The boxer's battle for self-acceptance even threatens the most meaningful and enduring relationship he's got, the one with his brother and manager, Joey (Joe Pesci); indeed, Raging Bull is, to a large extent, about the effect of blind ambition on our most meaningful, enduring relationships.

Continue reading: Raging Bull Review

But I'm A Cheerleader Review


Weak

"But I'm a Cheerleader" is pure camp, from its often hammy acting to its candy-colored ambience to its plot about an in-crowd high schooler whose panicked suburban parents pack her away to retreat where sexually tilted teenagers are supposed to be "cured" of homosexual tendencies.

A social satire with a John Waters-inspired bent, the picture casts caustic Natasha Lyonne ("Slums of Beverly Hills") deliberately against type as a peppy-under-peer-pressure cheerleader who eats tofu, listens to Melissa Ethridge and is so indifferent to the drooling advances of her hunky super-jock boyfriend that her friends and Bible-beater family hold an intervention and confront her with the fact that they all think she must be a lesbian.

In spite of cheer-like protests, Lyonne is sent to a group home called True Directions, where effeminate boys in baby blue shirts and ties, and butch girls in crisp, pink Donna Reed attire are inundated with antiquated ideals about sex roles and encouraged to dry-hump inmates of the opposite sex by a staff of heavily in denial "reformed" gays.

Continue reading: But I'm A Cheerleader Review

Cathy Moriarty

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