Shawn Hatosy

Shawn Hatosy

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Actress Molly Gordon, actor Jake Weary, actor Scott Speedman, actress Ellen Barkin, actor Shawn Hatosy, actress Daniella Alonso, actor Finn Cole , actor Ben Robson - Premiere of TNT's 'Animal Kingdom' at The Rose Room - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 8th June 2016

Jake Weary, Actress Molly Gordon, Actor Finn Cole, Actor Ben Robson, Scott Speedman, Ellen Barkin, Shawn Hatosy, Daniella Alonso and Animal Kingdom

The Bad Lieutenant: Port Of Call New Orleans Trailer


Terrence McDonagh is a cop who's not really known for his courageous acts but when he sees a man drowning in a cell, he jumps to save him. His act of bravery might have won him a promotion to lieutenant but it's also left him with a bad back injury.

As his back becomes more of a problem McDonagh develops a serious drug problem, turning to any dark alley to find relief. Bribery and stealing drugs put into evidence become part of the norm for him, the most stability in his life comes from a relationship he has with a prostitute called Frankie but when he finds her beaten by a client, he takes matters into his own hands. Working in a drug induced state becomes more of an issue for McDonagh. Whilst trying to solve the murders of six Senegal immigrants it appears his personal life and current case will cross paths.

Directed by: Werner Herzog

Starring: Nicolas Cage, Eva Mendes, Val Kilmer, Xzibit, Brad Dourif, Fairuza Balk, Shawn Hatosy, Jennifer Coolidge, Tom Bower, Vondie Curtis-Hall, Denzel Whitaker, Michael Shannon

Public Enemies Trailer


Watch the trailer for Public Enemies.

Continue: Public Enemies Trailer

Alpha Dog Review


Weak
Nick Cassavetes' Alpha Dog is an infuriating misfire that would have been much more easily overlooked had it managed to stay true to one vision or the other; instead, Cassavetes (who also wrote the screenplay) keeps one foot in the teen-exploitation camp and another in the hardboiled true crime camp, never quite making up his mind which way to go. For every moment that plays real there are at least two that absolutely do not, producing a wildly schizophrenic film that has many chances at greatness and misses nearly all of them.

The pugilistic script is based on one of those fascinatingly ugly crime stories that come rocketing out of Southern California every now and again, to much clucking of tongues over wayward and rudderless youth. Following the sad state of events that leads a drug dealer to kidnap the younger brother of a client who owes him money, as a means of extracting said payment, the film traces how the kidnapped teenager (a momma's boy who yearns for rebellion) develops a horribly overwrought case of Stockholm Syndrome, earnestly believing he's just having a good time with the dealer's hard-partying friends. In fact, while the kids party like it's 1999 (the year the kidnapping actually took place), imbibing copious amounts of drugs and alcohol, the dealer, Johnny (Emile Hirsch, like an evil version of Turtle from Entourage) is panicking, having realized what he's gotten himself into.

Continue reading: Alpha Dog Review

11:14 Review


Good
Car crashes seem to be ripe material for screenwriters looking for a hook to hang their movies on. From Intersection to Crash to Crash (the other one), this seems to be a well-travelled genre. 11:14 adds another notch in that post, a Rashomon-like story of a half-dozen characters who all intersect on one quiet road at 11:14 PM, which results in the loss of at least one life, one male member, a lot of cash, and endless property damage. The immediate before and after of the event contain even more chaos, including a gunshot wound for Hilary Swank.. The film tells each story in sequence, each time adding a little more context to this bizarre series of events, and each time causing us to care a little bit less about what exactly happened. It's not terrible filmmaking, but the plot's "cleverness" will hardly knock your boots off.

The Faculty Review


Very Good
Finally. We always knew Robert Rodriguez had talent as a filmmaker. We were just waiting for someone to put a good script in his hands, and Kevin Williamson has done that here. Do not be fooled by the woefully bad trailers, or by the fact that critics have roundly panned this horror film. The Faculty is easily the best of the genre to come along since Williamson's breakout hit, Scream. It is also the first watchable film Rodriguez has put up since storming onto the scene with El Mariachi.

Easily the biggest problem with this movie is in the marketing. I can only imagine how pissed off Williamson, Rodriguez, and everyone else involved in the movie must have been to see the film marketed as just another schlocky entry into the horror genre, which generally takes the words aliens; teenagers; battle; suspicious; killer; small town; etc. and jumble them up to come up with a concept (to wit, this time: suspicious small town teenagers battle killer aliens). Now if you are already a big 80s horror fan, just skip this review, because you already saw the movie, but this review is for people who are highly suspicious of shelling out eight bucks to see a horror flick. The only reason I actually saw The Faculty was because my little sister begged me to. But now I'm trying to convince you to.

Continue reading: The Faculty Review

Borstal Boy Review


Excellent
Irish filmmaking has always resonated with an urgent sense of political forethought. Filmmaker Jim Sheridan diligently championed the determined spirit of tortured protagonists in gutsy pictures such as My Left Foot, The Boxer, and In the Name of the Father. In the uplifting Emerald Isle melodrama Borstal Boy, Jim's brother Peter Sheridan effectively explores the trials and tribulations of a 16-year old boy's exploits behind the unbearable confines of a British World War II borstal, a reformatory center for boys, based on charismatic Irish writer Brendan Behan's memoir. Provocative and resoundingly crafty, Borstal Boy is a solid and refined piece of moviemaking imbued with passion and attitude.

Thanks to his heavy involvement in IRA-related activities, the film opens with Brendan (Shawn Hatosy, Anywhere But Here, John Q) in jail in East Anglia, England. Among the prison-camp personalities that the overwhelmed Brendan encounters are a thieving gay sailor named Millwall (Danny Dyer), whom he eventually. He also finds a love interest in the lovely and supportive Liz (Eva Birthistle), who happens to be the daughter of the facility's presiding Governor (Michael York). Consequently, Brendan begins to shape his outlook on life, challenging what was once a rigid belief system entrenched in his conservative shell.

Continue reading: Borstal Boy Review

A Guy Thing Review


Weak

Jason Lee is usually the funniest guy in any Kevin Smith movie (Banky in "Chasing Amy," Azrael in "Dogma"). Julia Stiles has had fine comedic timing ever since her big splash in "10 Things I Hate About You." But they couldn't be more mismatched as romantic leads in "A Guy Thing."

A cold-feet comedy of accumulative misunderstandings about a groom-to-be who wakes up with a blonde in his bed the morning after his bachelor party -- and assumes the worst -- the movie spends most of its time mining very familiar territory. Lee hides the girl's forgotten panties, discovers she's his fiancée's cousin, and has generic nightmare run-ins with his future in-law and Stiles' ex-boyfriend.

Most of its jokes come from the compounding lies that make it hard to sympathize with the hero, and the moment you meet each one-trait character, you can see his or her entire story arc mapped out in front of you. Example: Stifled Lee, who's going to veer from his buttoned-up, conservative bride-to-be (Selma Blair) and fall in love with wild-child Stiles, has a buttoned-up, conservative brother (Thomas Lennon) who is secretly in love with Blair. Hmmm...I can't imagine where that's going.

Continue reading: A Guy Thing Review

Simpatico Review


Weak

Adapted from Sam Shepard's play about betrayal, blackmail, and a horse racing scam that haunts its conspirators for 20 years, "Simpatico" gets by for a while on a cast full of tense, brutal, benumbed performances.

Nick Nolte stars as Vinnie, a haunted, hard-drinking and fraudulent private eye who has lived a near-destitute existence in Los Angeles for two decades on hush money extorted from a former friend named Carter (Jeff Bridges), his partner in a pony-fixing during their younger days.

As the film opens, Vinnie sets in motion a chain of events designed to see him trade places with Carter, now a rich Kentucky breeder. He plans not only on usurping the wealth his ex-buddy has amassed since their friendship disintegrated, but also on recapturing the cold heart of Rosie (Sharon Stone), the girl that came between them.

Continue reading: Simpatico Review

Shawn Hatosy

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Shawn Hatosy Movies

The Bad Lieutenant: Port Of Call New Orleans Trailer

The Bad Lieutenant: Port Of Call New Orleans Trailer

Terrence McDonagh is a cop who's not really known for his courageous acts but when...

Public Enemies Trailer

Public Enemies Trailer

Watch the trailer for Public Enemies.Public Enemies was a name given to bank robbers and...

Alpha Dog Movie Review

Alpha Dog Movie Review

Nick Cassavetes' Alpha Dog is an infuriating misfire that would have been much more easily...

The Faculty Movie Review

The Faculty Movie Review

Finally. We always knew Robert Rodriguez had talent as a filmmaker. We were...

A Guy Thing Movie Review

A Guy Thing Movie Review

Jason Lee is usually the funniest guy in any Kevin Smith movie (Banky in "Chasing...

Simpatico Movie Review

Simpatico Movie Review

Adapted from Sam Shepard's play about betrayal, blackmail, and a horse racing scam that haunts...

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