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Richard Jenkins

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The Hollars Trailer


Don and Sally Hollars' family are all grown up and they live alone. They have two sons and John lives in New York at works as an artist attempting to make a name for himself. Their other son, Ron lives closer to home and up until recently lived with his wife and their young family but now his marriage has fallen to pieces and he's alone.

When Sally falls ill, the family reunites and John leaves his heavily pregnant girlfriend, Rebecca, in the city whilst he pays a visit to the family home. Once back in the small town he grew up in, it seems the family matriarch is much more ill than they all first presumed.

Spending time in hospital, John is quickly submerged into his old family and all the issues that comes with them - not only that but he must deal with his ex-girlfriends new partner who's also his mother's nurse.

Continue: The Hollars Trailer

Jack Reacher Review


Very Good

Tom Cruise may be oddly miscast in this big action movie, but he certainly knows how to make one of these preposterous films connect with an audience. And writer-director McQuarrie adds a driving sense of internal logic that keeps it consistently enjoyable. So even if the hero in Lee Child's series of novels is a 6-foot-5 blond-haired, blue-eyed muscle-man, the cast and crew get away withThe story takes place in Pittsburgh, where a multiple shooting leads Detective Emerson (Oyelowo) and DA Rodin (Jenkins) to a withdrawn gun nut (Sikora). It seems like an open-and-shut case until man of mystery Jack Reache (Cruise) turns up. An off-the-grid ex-Army agent, Jack offers to help defence attorney Helen (Pike) prove her client's innocence. Of course, he instantly solves the case, uncovering a conspiracy and putting himself and Helen in danger from a ruthless Russian (Herzog) and his henchman (Courtenay). Meanwhile, Jack befriends a gun-range owner (Duvall) who has a connection to the case.

There's clearly an attempt here to echo Bourne-style questioning of identity and morality through Jack's hazy history and super-spy methodology. And the plot is also packed with far-fetched details and silly connections (Helen is Rodin's daughter), although McQuarrie does his best to keep things plausible and intelligent enough to hold our attention. There's also a sense of the bigger issue in Jack's life, that he can't cope with the grey-scale relativity in society and prefers right-or-wrong battlefield morality. He also hates modern-day connectivity, refusing to carry a mobile phone. But then he doesn't travel with a vehicle, weapon or change of clothing either; he prefers to "borrow" everything as needed.

Despite being nearly a foot shorter than the literary Jack, Cruise inhabits the role nicely, offering a slightly scrapper, more shadowy version of his Mission: Impossible character. But he's just as sexless, never putting much oomph into his flirtation with the always terrific Pike. On the other hand, he generously lets his costars steal every scene. Duvall is hilariously offhanded, while Herzog adds his own mad genius into his role as a, well, mad genius. And Oyelowo more than holds his own opposite these veteran hams. So even if the film never tries to be anything more than a ripping, mindless thriller, the stylish filmmaking and cool characters make it an enjoyable waste of time.

Continue reading: Jack Reacher Review

Jack Reacher Premiere Postponed Out Of Respect For Shooting Victims


Tom Cruise Rosamund Pike Richard Jenkins

Tom Cruise and Paramount's new film, Jack Reacher, will be put on ice for the time being as the film's producers have deemed the time inappropriate to hold a lavish film premiere in lieu of yesterdays horrific shooting incident that has horrified the nation and the world.

With a nation in mourning for the 28 people left dead, 20 of whom were children, at an elementary school in Newtown, Connecticut, Paramount have decided the best thing to do is to postpone tonight's premiere in Pittsburg for an indefinite time. In a statement obtained by E! News, a spokesperson for the production company said: "Due to the terrible tragedy...and out of honor and respect for the families of the victims whose lives were senselessly taken, we are postponing tomorrow's Pittsburgh premiere of Jack Reacher. Our hearts go out to all those who lost loved ones."

The upcoming action film, which stars Rosamund Pike and Richard Jenkins as well as Cruise, sees the film veteran play a loner detective, who possesses exceptional intelligence and physical acumen as he investigates a case, involving a trained military sniper who shot five random victims. The film has already enjoyed premieres in London and Stockholm and was due to have its U.S. premiere in Pittsburg today (Dec 15). Certain parts of the film were shot in Pittsburgh, hence its selection as the locale for the U.S. premiere.

Review Roundup: Killing Them Softly Underwhelms


Brad Pitt Ray Liotta James Gandolfini Richard Jenkins

Based on the 1974 novel 'Cogan's Trade', Killing Them Softly stars Brad Pitt, Richard Jenkins, James Gandolfini and Ray Liotta. The movie is also a reunion between Brad Pitt and Andrew Dominik has both written and directed the movie. He also directed The Assassination of Jessie James by the Coward Robert Ford in 2007. Reviews for that were fairly similar to the critical reception for Killing Them Softly- the warmer side of luke warm.

Killing Them Softly is a grisly crime thriller, based around a mob poker game gone back and the subsequent investigation. The New York Times said it's "more concerned with conjuring an aura of meaningfulness than with actually meaning anything," and the Village Voice thought it repetitive and lacking subtlety, apparently it "shows, and then tells, tells, and tells again, its vibrant conjuring of contemporary cynicism felled by Dominik's lack of faith in his audience's ability to connect thematic dots." It's not all bad news though and Brad Pitt's performance has been receiving high praise. Rolling Stone said that "The acting is aces, especially Pitt mixing it up with the superb James Gandolfini, as an assassin losing his game to hooch and hookers. They make this movie a potently nasty provocation." The New Yorker agreed, focusing on a single scene they said, "One of the best things in the movie is a conversation between Pitt and Jenkins, on a torrential day, seated in a nondescript car beneath a bridge."

Dominik has made only three movies and they've all been in a similar vein, all falling under the umbrella banner of 'crime thriller', however neither The Assassination of Jesse James nor this year's Killing Them Softly seems to have met the high standards set by the 2000 movie Chopper, for which the young director won numerous awards. Chopper was created with a heavy dose of humour to offset the brutality and it's that lighthearted approach that seems to be lacking in his other two ventures. Nevertheless, it's up for release tomorrow (30th Nov 2012) and is worth seeing if only for Pitt's performance. 

Killing Them Softly Review


Excellent

Moral murkiness makes this hitman thriller gripping to watch, mainly because we're never quite sure where it's going. Even though it's set in 2008, Australian director Dominik (The Assassination of Jesse James) shoots it like a 1970s thriller, which gives the whole film a superb sense of moral murkiness. And since it's based on a 1974 novel (Cogan's Trade by George Higgins), the film has an almost timely feel to it, using offbeat rhythms and complex characters who refuse to do what we want them to do.

At the centre is Jackie Cogan (Pitt), hired by a bookish mafia executive (Jenkins) to clean up the mess after a mob card game was robbed. The problem is that the two guys behind the heist (McNairy and Mendelsohn) are dimwits who have no idea what they've stumbled into. But Cogan is also annoyed by mob bureaucracy, which takes far too long to get anything done. And he's even more short-tempered with his old pal Mickey (Gandolfini), who he brings in to bump off a middleman (Liotta), except that Mickey is too interested in alcohol and sex to get the job done properly. Clearly, Jackie will have to do everything himself.

Pitt plays the role with a terrific sense of world-weary charm. He has no time for the losers around him, but takes pride in his work, preferring to kill his targets softly rather than causing pain. Meanwhile, Gandolfini is playing an alcoholic twist on Tony Soprano, Jenkins is doing his usual officious schtick, and Liotta is a more soulful version of the mafioso he's played many times before. By contrast, McNairy and Mendelsohn are hilariously clueless. Like characters from a Coen brothers movie, they're likeable even though we never have any hope that they'll get anything right.

Continue reading: Killing Them Softly Review

Killing Them Softly Trailer


Jackie Cogan is the enforcer in an organized mob. He becomes the key investigator when a raid takes place at a poker game by two men armed with shotguns who manage to make off with $100,000 when the game was supposed to be protected by the gang. Jackie sets out to find the robbers but when he discovers that they are just two loud-mouthed amateur delinquents, he cunningly uses them to find out who was really behind the heist, pretending to befriend one of them, Steve Caprio.

Continue: Killing Them Softly Trailer

Jack Reacher Trailer


Opening on a terrified-looking man in a hospital bed, we are immediately informed that Jack Reacher is a, "kind of cop", but doesn't care about proof or the law, only what's right. From the word go, we ca see that Reacher is not a man to be trifled with.

Continue: Jack Reacher Trailer

The Cabin In The Woods Review


Excellent
The script for this horror romp is almost too inventive, cleverly combining clashing genres and playing hilariously with a range of cliches while thoroughly grossing out the audience. It's certainly a riot of fun to watch, even if it's not actually that scary.

Taking a break from her pre-med studies, Dana (Connolly) heads off to a mountain cabin with her flatmate Jules (Hutchison), their stoner pal Marty (Kranz) and Jules' muscle-jock boyfriend Curt (Hemsworth), who has invited his friend Holden (Williams) as a possible date for Dana. But they have no idea that two sardonic businessmen (Jenkins and Whitford) are managing an elaborate underground operation during which they are manipulating everything about the cabin. And it starts to become clear that, to save the world, all five young people must die in the correct order.

Continue reading: The Cabin In The Woods Review

The Rum Diary Review


Good
Depp's Hunter S Thompson fixation continues with the adaptation of this loosely autobiographical novel. Despite some crazy antics, the film takes an earnest, slightly too-faithful tone that makes it strangely leaden.

In 1960, Kemp (Depp) applies for a job at the San Juan Star in Puerto Rico, working for the sardonic editor Lotterman (Jenkins). He shares a ramshackle flat with photographer Sala (Rispoli), who home-brews super-strong rum with another journalist (Ribisi). While getting slowly pickled, Kemp also gets to know the fast-talking Sanderson (Eckhart), a public relations expert who is using property developers to increase his fortune. Sanderson also has a sexy girlfriend, Chenault (Heard), who immediately catches Kemp's eye. Trouble is brewing everywhere.

Continue reading: The Rum Diary Review

Friends With Benefits Review


Good
A smart, witty script and a likable cast help overcome the deep-seated rom-com cliches the filmmakers set out to deconstruct. But the central couple's strong chemistry and a stream of lively side characters keep us involved and entertained.

After a humiliating breakup, Dylan (Timberlake) meets with high-achieving headhunter Jamie (Kunis) about a new job. Friendship blossoms, and since Jamie is emotionally damaged after a recent split and Dylan is emotionally unavailable, they decide to sleep together without any deeper attachment.

Meanwhile, they get increasingly involved in each others' lives, most notably as Dylan and his sister (Elfman) cope with their senile father (Jenkins). Of course, the main question is whether Dylan and Jamie can remain friends even if they have sex.

Continue reading: Friends With Benefits Review

The Rum Diary Trailer


Freelance journalist Paul Kemp decides one day that's he had enough of the hectic lifestyle that the early 1960's New York brings. He moves to Puerto Rico in the Caribbean to take a job at a rundown local newspaper, 'The San Juan Star', run by the equally run down Lotterman.

Continue: The Rum Diary Trailer

HappyThankYouMorePlease Trailer


It's Sam's 'big day', today is the day he's set to meet with a publishing house with a view to possibly publishing his first novel, something he's wanted all his life. Sitting on the subway, Sam notices a little boy get separated from his guardian, unwilling to leave the boy alone, Sam tries to take the boy, Rasheen, to the police, but he has different ideas and bolts. After catching up with the boy, Sam learns that Rasheen's been in the care of social services before and will not return. Late for his meeting, Sam reluctantly agrees to take Rasheen in for a few days until they find a suitable arrangement.

Continue: HappyThankYouMorePlease Trailer

Dear John Trailer


John Tyree is a member of the US Army. Whilst on leave he meets a young woman called Savannah Lynn Curtis, the two fall in love almost instantly. The two spend all their time together before Jon is called back to the Army for a tour of service. The couple remain an item despite the lack of contact, both find themselves becoming dependent on their letters to one and other. 7 years down the line as their situations change Savannah finds herself engaged to another man. Now utterly depressed by the news John rushes into a dangerous situation and gets seriously injured. Eventually John is made to leave the army, he must get his real life back on track. How their separation will affect his life is a true testament to his will.

Continue: Dear John Trailer

The Mudge Boy Review


Good
Writer/director Michael Burke said he wanted to tell a story about growing up as a kid too sensitive for a harsh environment (rural Vermont). Now I've never thought of Vermont is "harsh," but God knows I hope Burke's life as a youth didn't include being raped by his friend in a barn and molesting a chicken. Pity Emile Hirsch's Duncan Mudge, who is trying to get his life back together after the death of his mother. Cold dad (Richard Jenkins) is no help, sending Duncan to look for companionship in the guise of the local hoods who ride around in a pickup. Sadly, despite a few graphic and disturbing events, nothing much happens to Duncan -- at least nothing which could be considered a "story." When the credits rolled, I was shocked by the state of disarray the plot had been left in. (Unsurprisingly, the script came out of a Sundance workshop.)

The Kid (2000) Review


Excellent
Remorse is a dangerous thing in the mind of a man. It can hold a person down, quell his dreams, suffocate innocence, and convert people into intolerable beasts. People often think that if they could go back in time and reverse the wrongs done to them, a great weight would be somehow lifted from their shoulders. Beat up that bully that destroyed your self-esteem, kiss the girl you were in love with, stand up to the father that used you for a whipping post. These memories haunt the minds of individuals all around us like the ghosts of the Winchester Mansion.

What if you really had the chance to change all of that? What if you could talk to yourself when you were only eight years old and explain how to take a stand for yourself, give the younger you understanding of why dad is so angry at the world, and give yourself hope for retaining individuality in a sea of conformity. In the new Disney film The Kid Russ Duritz gets that once in a lifetime chance.

Continue reading: The Kid (2000) Review

Say It Isn't So Review


Bad
Another year, another Farrelly brothers production.

This time out, we get American Pie alum Chris Klein and the saucy Heather Graham in what is undoubtedly the crudest film we will ever see. That is, at least until Tom Green takes center stage in Freddy Got Fingered later this year.

Continue reading: Say It Isn't So Review

What Planet Are You From? Review


Bad

A comedian whose schtick has always been his acute social-sexual dysfunction, in "What Planet Are You From?" Garry Shandling is nothing if not well-cast as an alien packed off to Earth by his neutered, all-male race to impregnate an earth female as a prelude to invasion.

Given a crash course in inept pick-up lines and fitted with a motorized prosthetic penis that hums when he's aroused, Shandling is transported to the privy of a passenger jet and emerges to piggishly proposition stewardesses and every other female in sight, in what has to be the most awkwardly sexist comedy since the 1960s.

Populated by fundamentally unlikable, abusive men and pathetically needy, bitchy women, the drudging, deadpan farce tracks Shandling's libidinous frustration as he fails to pick up chicks and is chased by FAA investigator John Goodman (his arrival caused an air traffic incident), who figures out his secret with the flimsiest of suppositions.

Continue reading: What Planet Are You From? Review

Me, Myself & Irene Review


Weak

If only Jim Carrey's uninhibited and completely unhinged, sweet-and-sour insanity was by itself enough to carry a movie, it might not matter so much that the plot of the Farrelly Brothers' "Me, Myself and Irene" is nothing but an undercooked on-the-run road movie.

Full of crooked cops and rich, double-crossing ex-boyfriends, it's a dim bulb script the boys had shelved ages ago and dusted off last year only after a couple post-"There's Something About Mary" projects fell through.

Sustained only by its outrageousness (breast milk gags, anyone?) and Carrey's hammy physical humor, the movie does have its fair share of laughs. But between guffaws there's nothing to keep the uneven "Irene" from collapsing under its own dead weight.

Continue reading: Me, Myself & Irene Review

The Core Review


Unbearable

It would be a terrible shame if talented actors like Stanley Tucci, Delroy Lindo and Alfre Woodard have reached a point where money trumps professional pride. But I can't imagine any other reason they'd sign on to a half-witted, obscenely formulaic, huge-budget save-the-Earth sci-fi embarrassment like "The Core."

Almost exactly the same movie as "Armageddon" -- and almost as insufferable -- it features a handful of good-looking scientists and NASA astronauts who, instead of going into space to set off a nuke and save the world from a asteroid, travel to the center of the Earth to set off a nuke, thus restarting the dying molten core and saving the world from electromagnetic disaster.

The exact same shopworn characters die in the exact same order, some accidentally, some heroically to save the mission. The simplest laws of physics and even plain-as-day physical facts are utterly ignored (the nuke-the-core plan is based on two-dimensional thinking even though the Earth is -- duh! -- a sphere).

Continue reading: The Core Review

Richard Jenkins

Richard Jenkins Quick Links

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Richard Jenkins

Date of birth

4th May, 1947

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.85


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Richard Jenkins Movies

The Shape Of The Water Trailer

The Shape Of The Water Trailer

It's 1963 and Elisa (Sally Hawkins) has spent her life trying to be as normal...

The Hollars Trailer

The Hollars Trailer

Don and Sally Hollars' family are all grown up and they live alone. They have...

Bone Tomahawk Trailer

Bone Tomahawk Trailer

Life is quite sedentary in the small town of Bright Hope, the people rely on...

God's Pocket Movie Review

God's Pocket Movie Review

Despite a strong sense of the characters and the setting, this film struggles to engage...

Turbo Movie Review

Turbo Movie Review

Whizzy and superficial, this isn't the most complicated animated film ever made, but it's a...

White House Down Movie Review

White House Down Movie Review

This may look exactly like Gerard Butler's over-serious Olympus Has Fallen, but it's actually that...

Turbo Trailer

Turbo Trailer

Turbo has big dreams for such a small garden snail; dreams that stretch beyond his...

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Turbo Trailer

Turbo Trailer

Turbo might be just your average garden snail but there's one thing that sets him...

As I Lay Dying Trailer

As I Lay Dying Trailer

Addie Bundren is on her deathbed in the Mississippi town in which she lives with...

White House Down Trailer

White House Down Trailer

When USCP officer John Cale is turned down as he applies for a highly coveted...

Turbo Trailer

Turbo Trailer

Turbo is a regular garden snail who, unlike his friends, is bored of living his...

The Company You Keep Trailer

The Company You Keep Trailer

Ben Shepard is a young and ambitious reporter determined to make a name for himself...

Turbo Trailer

Turbo Trailer

Turbo is a garden snail with big dreams of becoming the speediest snail in the...

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