Luc Roeg

Luc Roeg

Luc Roeg Quick Links

Film RSS

The Falling Review


Extraordinary

While cinematic blockbusters tickle the eyes, this film dazzles the soul. This is a remarkably evocative drama that gets deep under the skin, challenging us to see ourselves in a rather outrageous situation that shifts from quietly disturbing drama to unsettling freakiness. It's strikingly written, directed and performed to get into our heads and stay there like few movies do.

The story is set in 1969 in a girls' school located in the lush English countryside, where 16-year-old Lydia (Maisie Williams) and her best pal Abbie (newcomer Florence Pugh) are members of the Alternative School Orchestra. They're also inseparable, carving their undying love into a tree trunk. But once Lydia has sex with a boy, their relationship begins to shift. And when Abbie faints in class, it seems to become contagious. Suddenly girls are collapsing all around the school, much to the consternation of the headmistress (Monica Dolan) and her stern deputy (Greta Scacchi). As the hysteria spreads, Lydia gets increasingly confused by the occult beliefs of her older brother (Joe Cole) and the agoraphobic behaviour of their mother (Maxine Peake). But what she really misses is her childhood connection with Abbie.

Writer-director Carol Morley (Dreams of a Life) lets this play out like a deranged fairy tale in which Lydia's voyage to self-discovery is both wondrous and terrible at the same time. In its vivid exploration of feminine adolescence, the film echoes such classics as Picnic at Hanging Rock or Heavenly Creatures, by way of David Lynch and Nicolas Roeg (whose son Luc is one of the producers here). And the bold, knowing themes are echoed in gorgeously artful cinematography by the great Agnes Godard plus a stunner of a soundtrack by Tracey Thorn. Amid this sumptuous atmosphere, Morley weaves an enigmatic story packed with mystery, revelations and yes, burgeoning sexuality. But even more than this, the film taps in to the earth-mother power girls discover as they emerge into womanhood.

Continue reading: The Falling Review

Boxing Day Review


Good

With their third present-day Tolstoy adaptation, filmmaker Rose and actor Huston continue to skilfully explore timeless issues with an urgent, modern style of storytelling that feels almost documentary. Based Master and Man, this film shifts a bit jarringly from a social comedy into a dark thriller. And its themes are less personally resonant than either Ivansxtc or The Kreutzer Sonata.

This time Huston plays Basil, a Los Angeles businessman struggling with very bad debts. To make some quick cash, he abandons his family on the day after Christmas, flying to Denver to buy up some foreclosed houses and make a quick profit. Once there he teams up with chauffeur Nick (Jacobs), who drives him from house to house, eventually heading up into secluded bedroom communities in the Rockies. But after hanging out in a bar for the afternoon, they get lost on an isolated road as darkness falls. And when they get stuck in the snow, their thoughts turn to survival.

With two characters on distinct sides of the 1/99 percent divide, the film is strikingly relevant today. Especially since both men are in such precarious positions and yet still have such disdain for each other. Boris continually mocks Nick for being unfamiliar with his own new car, while Nick never even tries to conceal his contempt for Basil's callous privilege. Both Huston and Jacobs make the most of this, throwing barbed wit into their ongoing conversation while also clearly trying to find some common ground. So the moments of genuine friendship are surprisingly warm.

Continue reading: Boxing Day Review

We Need To Talk About Kevin Review


Essential
Scottish filmmaker Ramsay takes an astonishingly visceral approach to Lionel Shriver's notorious novel. And combined with Swinton's internalised performance, the experience of watching this dark, disturbing film is almost unbearably moving.

Eva (Swinton) is a shell of her former self, living in isolation as the target of anger from an entire community. She clearly blames herself for an act of violence unleashed by her 15-year-old son Kevin (Miller), and misses her husband (Reilly) and daughter (Gerasimovich). But as she finds a job and starts to put her life together, the memories won't stop swirling in her mind. Does she even deserve to have survived such a horrific event? Can she ever make peace with the grieving, enraged people around her?

Continue reading: We Need To Talk About Kevin Review

Let Him Have It Review


OK
Is it odd that every film about British justice is truly about its miscarriage? Let Him Have It is unfortunately a tepid entry into Britain's genre of choice. Alongside films like In the Name of the Father it pales in comparison. Christopher Eccleston (with the aid of his entire family, it seems) plays amicably well the role of a "slow-witted" man condemned to execution for his part in the murder of a cop (the film revolves around the titular phrase: Was it meant literally (surrender the gun) or figuratively (shoot the bastard)?). But this movie is so slow and artless that its message -- that, you know, we shouldn't hang retarded kids -- isn't given much power.

Othello Review


Weak
Seldomly have I been so outright disappointed by a film. Othello's problems are numerous, and given the outstanding cast put together for the film (and an admitted masterpiece to work with), it's amazing that this film comes off as being so downright bad.

The story's been around for 400 years. Othello (Lawrence Fishburne) is a Moorish general in the Italian army, and he is the victim of constant prejudice. Desdemona (Irene Jacob) is his Italian lover, and when the pair secretly marry, Othello finds himself the victim of a fiendish plot by his servant Iago (Kenneth Branagh). Iago's motives are also magnified by the presence of young Cassio (Nathaniel Parker), who serves as Othello's right-hand man despite Iago's longer term of service.

Continue reading: Othello Review

Luc Roeg

Luc Roeg Quick Links

Film RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Filmmaker


Suggested

Paloma Faith - Better Than This Video

Paloma Faith - Better Than This Video

With her fifth studio album 'Infinite Things' set to be released later this year, Paloma Faith unveils a music video for her newest song 'Better Than...

Toots and the Maytals: Their seven most iconic tunes

Toots and the Maytals: Their seven most iconic tunes

Remembering the iconic Toots Hibbert (1942-2020).

Album of the Week: Blur's The Great Escape turns 25

Album of the Week: Blur's The Great Escape turns 25

'The Great Escape' was released on this day (September 11th) in 1995.

WE ARE CHAOS - Marilyn Manson Album Review

WE ARE CHAOS - Marilyn Manson Album Review

We were actually quite excited about Marilyn Manson's WE ARE CHAOS. The question is whether or not we were sorely disappointed...

Advertisement
Say No To Suicide: The greats we lost but will never forget

Say No To Suicide: The greats we lost but will never forget

World Suicide Prevention Day is the day to remember some of the world's greatest artists.

Six reasons why we'll never stop loving The Rolling Stones

Six reasons why we'll never stop loving The Rolling Stones

Few bands reach the legendary status of of the greatest rock 'n' roll band in the world.

Stormzy - Superheroes Video

Stormzy - Superheroes Video

With his forthcoming album 'Heavy is the Head' set for release this December, Stormzy has dropped an animated video for a new single entitled...

How Cardi B and Megan Thee Stallion's 'WAP' became the most political song of 2020

How Cardi B and Megan Thee Stallion's 'WAP' became the most political song of 2020

It's time to start letting women be empowered by their sexual attitudes.

Advertisement

Luc Roeg Movies

The Falling Movie Review

The Falling Movie Review

While cinematic blockbusters tickle the eyes, this film dazzles the soul. This is a remarkably...

Boxing Day Movie Review

Boxing Day Movie Review

With their third present-day Tolstoy adaptation, filmmaker Rose and actor Huston continue to skilfully explore...

Advertisement
We Need to Talk About Kevin Movie Review

We Need to Talk About Kevin Movie Review

Scottish filmmaker Ramsay takes an astonishingly visceral approach to Lionel Shriver's notorious novel. And combined...

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews