Lauren Bacall

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Anita Ekberg, Star Of "La Dolce Vita" Dies Aged 83


Anita Ekberg Lauren Bacall John Wayne

Anita Ekberg, the actress who danced in the Fontana di Trevi in Federico Fellini’s film “La Dolce Vita,” has died at the age of 83. Ekberg had been hospitalized recently after a series of illnesses, her lawyer, Patrizia Ubaldi told the Associated Press. She died at the Rocca di Papa Hospital in Rome.

Continue reading: Anita Ekberg, Star Of "La Dolce Vita" Dies Aged 83

FIT Museum To Celebrate Lauren Bacall With Exhibition Celebrating Her Style Through The Years


Lauren Bacall

Lauren Bacall, the Hollywood icon, who died this week at the age of 89, will receive a glamorous, comprehensive exhibition of her style through the years. Next spring, The Museum at FIT, in cooperation with students learning how to curate, will put on focused on five designers who helped define Bacall's personal style, her classic, seductive looks and subtle masculine energy. 

Lauren Bacall
Bacall defined a unique, smart and sensual style in the mid-20th century.

The exhibition will Bacall’s fashion favorites – Ives Saint Laurent and Norman Norell gowns, the kind of pieces the actress wore with grace and confidence.

Continue reading: FIT Museum To Celebrate Lauren Bacall With Exhibition Celebrating Her Style Through The Years

March 24, 1997: The Day Lauren Bacall Was Robbed Of An Oscar


Lauren Bacall Juliette Binoche

After over 40-plus years as one of Hollywood's leading ladies, Lauren Bacall - who died on Tuesday (August 12, 2014) aged 89 - had to wait until 1997 for her first Oscar nomination. The 72-year-old had turned in a tour-de-force performance in Barbra Streisand's The Mirror Has Two Faces - out-acting the screen legend herself, as well as Jeff Bridges and Pierce Brosnan.

Lauren BacallThe Inimitable Lauren Bacall [Getty/1954]

Bacall was considered a shoo-in to win the Academy Award (think Daniel Day-Lewis for Lincoln) after winning best supporting actress at the Golden Globes and Screen Actors Guild Awards, but things didn't go to plan on the night. As has happened so often since, the Academy picked its movie of the year - The English Patient - and ran with it, dishing out awards for what seemed like the entire cast. Though what on paper appeared a mere formality became one of the biggest shocks in Oscars history - the French actress Juliette Binoche winning best supporting actress for Anthony Minghella's romantic drama. Bacall's attempt at "I'm happy for you" applause became one of the most talked about moments of the ceremony. 

Continue reading: March 24, 1997: The Day Lauren Bacall Was Robbed Of An Oscar

Lauren Bacall, An Icon For Powerful Women In The Industry, Has Died At 89


Lauren Bacall Humphrey Bogart

More tragic news from Hollywood this week – actress Lauren Bacall has died at the age of 89. Bacall is one of the most recognized faces from the golden age of Hollywood and an actress hailed for her grace, wit and stunning looks. The actress’s own presence and sense of self never failed to match the celebrity of Humphrey Bogart, to whom she was married until his death in 1957. The Bogart estate announced that Bacall had died Tuesday at her apartment in the Dakota, according to the New York Daily News.

Lauren Bacall
Bacall was one of the icons of her generation and Hollywood in general.

Tall, slender and confident, Bacall was always one to grab the attention of those around her. But it was her tough, no nonsense attitude, that friends and colleagues remember her by. Having grown up in the Bronx, Bacall became the “dame-est of the dames” as actor John Cusack put it in his tweet on Tuesday.

Continue reading: Lauren Bacall, An Icon For Powerful Women In The Industry, Has Died At 89

Lauren Bacall Wednesday 18th November 2009 arriving at LAX airport with her dog to board a flight Los Angeles, California

Lauren Bacall

Lauren Bacall Tuesday 23rd October 2007 Opening night of the Roundabout Theater Off-Broadway production of "The Overwhelming" at the Laura Pels Theatre. New York City, USA

Lauren Bacall

Birth Review


Bad
Jonathan Glazer's stylish debut Sexy Beast stood out for the uncharacteristically explosive and vicious performance the director coaxed out of stately Ben Kingsley. Evidence of any such energy all but escapes Birth, Glazer's anticipated follow-up to his kinetic gangster picture. A plodding and pretentious thriller, this beyond-the-grave affair ends up being too art-house for the mainstream crowd and too mainstream for the art-house crowd. Loosely translated, that means it doesn't work for anyone.

Birth hangs its hat on a delicate premise that demands kid gloves if it seriously hopes to sustain the already shaky credibility. An elegant transition of life forces starts the film. Physician Sean dies while jogging. Simultaneously, a baby is born. Fast forward 10 years, where a cave-eyed child coincidentally named Sean (Cameron Bright) claims to Upper West Side basket case Anna (Nicole Kidman) that he is her reincarnated ex-husband. Anna's humorless fiancée (Danny Huston) scoffs at the idea. Her mother (a neglected Lauren Bacall) displays indifference. ("I never liked Sean, anyway," she articulates.) But Anna's not so quick to write the boy off.

Continue reading: Birth Review

Manderlay Review


Very Good
You should be very suspicious of anyone who owns Dogville and no other Lars Von Trier film. It's a ruse, a hoax, and a ploy, a way for that pretentious NYU philosophy major with the vintage Members Only jacket to impress that really cool, semi-punk girl with the cool Husker Du pin and prove to her that his brain is much more worthy than anyone else's. To like Dogville alone is to like the idea of Von Trier and to think you're special for picking up all the philosophical ideas behind it, along with name-checking Brecht. You're not, and Breaking the Waves, Dancer in the Dark, and The Element of Crime are much better films. Expect a copy of his latest film, Manderlay, Dogville's sequel, to be placed on that NYU kid's DVD shelf right next to Dogville, allowing for more philosophical meandering but this time, on racism and white, liberal guilt.

Picking up after the violent ending of Dogville, we catch up with Grace Mulligan (Bryce Dallas Howard, replacing Nicole Kidman) as her and her father (Willem Dafoe, replacing James Caan) end up at a small southern plantation named Manderlay. A young, black woman runs up to the car, yelling and crying about how they are going to whip Timothy (Isaach De Bankole). Stopping the car immediately and running onto the plantation, against her father's wishes, she finds that Manderlay is a plantation that still employs slavery. Seeing this as a grave injustice, Grace takes a few of her father's goons and starts running the plantation more like a business, making the white owners work while the slaves are given freedom to go about as they please, receiving shares in the crop's revenue. The slaves are led by Willhelm (Danny Glover), an older man who used to serve Mam (Lauren Bacall), the head of the plantation. As things progress, a dust storm, a child's death, the execution of an elder and Grace's slowly unraveling lust for Timothy start raising the issue that maybe things were better as they were.

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Dogville Review


Good
Evoking the age-old parable of human nature pillaging the likes of total goodness when it strangely pops up in town, Lars von Trier's much-anticipated Dogville has such intense extremes of useful experimentation and annoyingly repetitive patronization (a tendency throughout his respectable filmography) that the sum of its parts comes out evenly average.

Predictability reigns for much of the film, because we've seen the story far too often before. A stranger comes to town where the residents are skeptical of outsiders. She proceeds to go out of her way to ingratiate herself, they finally accept her, and then show their true colors against her of what they fear to inflict on one another due to extended co-habitation. The dysfunction turns into a gang of all versus one, regardless of any normal sense of morality, which they are able to slowly rationalize. On the one hand, the unhurried process through which this evolves respects the fact that nobody changes actions or views over night. But because we know it's going to happen, the path to getting there feels arduous.

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Dogville Review


Weak

Lars von Trier's peculiar compulsion to humiliate his heroines (and by extension the actresses who play them) has finally crescendoed to a deafening din of indiscriminate, exasperating martyrdom in "Dogville," a daring experiment in heightened performance and minimalist filmmaking that is fatally undermined by the Danish writer-director's conceit as a narrator.

His last four movies ("Breaking the Waves," "The Idiots," "Dancer in the Dark" and now "Dogville") have all dealt largely with the psychological (and sometimes physical) torture of vulnerable female protagonists. While his storytelling and cinematic style are almost always compelling, he's never seemed so arbitrary in his sadism than in this allegory of a beautiful, 1930s flapper fugitive hiding from the mob in a ragged, remote, austere Colorado mountain hamlet, where the tiny populace goes from distrustful to accepting to maliciously cruel on little more than von Trier's say-so.

Played with discernible dedication by Nicole Kidman, Grace is a porcelain enigma of self-flagellation so determined to escape some kind of shadowy past that, in exchange for the skeptical township's shelter, she agrees to indentured servitude -- doing handy work, favors and manual labor one hour a day in each of the seven households. She gradually comes earn the friendship of all -- even those most reluctant to accept her.

Continue reading: Dogville Review

Lauren Bacall

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Lauren Bacall Movies

Birth Movie Review

Birth Movie Review

Jonathan Glazer's stylish debut Sexy Beast stood out for the uncharacteristically explosive and vicious performance...

Manderlay Movie Review

Manderlay Movie Review

You should be very suspicious of anyone who owns Dogville and no other Lars Von...

Dogville Movie Review

Dogville Movie Review

Evoking the age-old parable of human nature pillaging the likes of total goodness when it...

Dogville Movie Review

Dogville Movie Review

Lars von Trier's peculiar compulsion to humiliate his heroines (and by extension the actresses who...

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