John Cena makes his bed every morning so that he always "starts the day with a complete task".

The 'Peacemaker' actor - who announced his WWE retirement tour over the weekend after two decades in the wrestling world - has opened up about his morning routine, which includes giving himself a sense of accomplishment when he first wakes up.

He told the WJS. Magazine: "On a typical Monday, I rise at 6 to 7am. I love to make the bed.

"I recall a commencement speech by a navy admiral who said that if you want to change the world, make a bed.

"The hidden takeaway there was, give yourself something that you did for the day. Because there are those days when we wake up on the wrong side of the bed.

"I just think, 'You know, man, I already did this. I already started the day with a complete task.' "

Meanwhile, the 47-year-old star revealed he likes to wake up around two hours before he needs to leave the house, even if that means rising at 3am.

Asked how he likes his coffee and breakfast, he said: "I don’t like to rush it. I give myself 90 minutes to two hours from the time I wake up to the time that I need to go to the first location or do the first thing.

"If my pickup is at 6 am, I’ll wake up at 3 to give myself those hours.

"I use that time trying to get my central nervous system going, to review: What are my goals for the day? What’s my purpose?"

Cena also reflected on his iconic wrestling outfit, having wrestled in "jorts" for his entire career - and he insisted there is a good reason for that.

He explained: "The reason I wear jorts is because I’ve tried everything. Denim is really durable — it doesn’t rip a lot as long as you can find a good fit.

"I don’t need any families attending a WWE event looking at my ugly bit. All you need to do is find something that fits around the butt and the thigh, because I always wear a drawstring belt. A belt buckle, you can really get messed up on.'

"I’ve learned this through failure. It can stab you, it can scratch you, it can scrape you and it can also cause damage to opponents and referees. This is not a good piece of equipment."