James Toback

James Toback

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Selma Blair And Rachel McAdams Detail Sexual Harassment Encounters With Director James Toback


James Toback Selma Blair Rachel McAdams

Hollywood stars Selma Blair and Rachel McAdams have spoken out about their alleged encounters with under-fire director James Toback, who has recently been accused of sexual assault by nearly 40 women.

Last week, the Los Angeles Times published an expose claiming that 38 women came forward with complaints of sexual harassment from the one-time Oscar nominee Toback over several years.

Toback replied to the same publication denying the accusations, calling them “biologically impossible” because he has had diabetes and a heart condition for 22 years.

Continue reading: Selma Blair And Rachel McAdams Detail Sexual Harassment Encounters With Director James Toback

Mississippi Grind Review

Good

As the story snakes south through the United States along the Mississippi River, this movie builds up a bleak, mopey vibe that's difficult to engage with. It's the story of two gambling addicts who think that the answer to all of their problems lies just around the next bend in the river, and it's sharply well written and directed, with astute performances from the lead actors. But it's also relentlessly grim and unsympathetic.

They start their journey in Iowa, where estate agent Gerry (Ben Mendelsohn) is at the end of his rope when he meets cocky gambler Curtis (Ryan Reynolds). There's a spark of recognition between them, as Gerry sees Curtis as himself 10 years younger, thinking maybe he can kickstart his life again. So they hit the road together, heading for a high-stakes poker game in New Orleans. Along the way, they stop to visit Curtis' favourite prostitute (Sienna Miller) in St. Louis and Gerry's bitter ex-wife (Robin Weigert) in Little Rock. And in between, they visit Memphis to win some extra cash. But by the time they reach New Orleans, things are starting to look desperate again.

 

Continue reading: Mississippi Grind Review

Seduced And Abandoned Review


Excellent

Anyone interested in how movies get made will love this feisty behind-the-scenes documentary, which uses sharp comedy to explore the messy business side of cinema. Both smart and very funny, it may not tell us much that we don't know (mainly that it's almost impossible to get a film financed unless it's a blockbuster with bankable stars), but it reveals things in ways that make us wonder about the future of the movies.

The film follows actor Alec Baldwin and director James Toback as they head to the Cannes Film Festival to secure funding for their planned Iraq-set riff on Last Tango in Paris. They meet with a variety of experts who tell them that their hoped-for budget is three times too high for a movie starring Baldwin and Neve Campbell. So they talk to Chastain, Bejo and Kruger about taking over the lead role. They also consult with a range of prominent filmmakers including Scorsese, Coppola, Polanski and the Last Tango maestro himself, Bertolucci. But the more time they spend with the people who control the money, the more they wonder if their movie will ever get made.

It's fairly clear from the start that Last Tango in Tikrit is a joke project, but everyone takes it seriously. And as they talk to prospective investors, Baldwin and Toback consider adjusting the film to get more cash by, for example, shooting scenes in Russia or China. It's fascinating to hear these billionaires offer advice on how to get their movie made. And hilariously, no one worries about Baldwin's insistence that the story requires explicit sexual scenes.

Continue reading: Seduced And Abandoned Review

Black And White (1999) Review


Good
A very unique and brutal subculture exists in America these days. It's a strange juxtaposition of harsh street life and uber-materialistic greed tempered with a sense of justifiability from a code of unwritten ethics. The world is that of the gangsta rappers, the ghetto boys, and the thug-life advocators that dominate the world of hip-hop and rap music. Black and White, the latest film by James Toback, explores this subculture that grows stronger with every new generation it affects.

The hardest thing about an outsider trying to infiltrate a subculture and explain it to the masses is that the truth is often lost in the translation. Toback throws together a huge canvas of characters and actors in attempt to create a clear picture of why white kids are motivated to impersonate black rappers' lifestyles and why rich whit guys treat black rappers like Arnold and Willis from Diff'rent Strokes.

Continue reading: Black And White (1999) Review

Fingers Review


Very Good
Rarely has a crime/gangster movie been produced with such a sense of calmness. Fingers, a cult classic, is a real showpiece for Harvey Keitel, who plays the title of Jimmy Fingers, a low-level gangster working for his father as a bag man but dreaming of becoming -- of all things -- a concert pianist.

Jimmy divides his day among busting caps, piano practice, and auditions for Carnegie Hall. The comparison to Taxi Driver is obvious, but these are far different films (and that said, Taxi Driver is a far better one, too).

Continue reading: Fingers Review

James Toback

James Toback Quick Links

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James Toback Movies

Mississippi Grind Movie Review

Mississippi Grind Movie Review

As the story snakes south through the United States along the Mississippi River, this movie...

Seduced and Abandoned Movie Review

Seduced and Abandoned Movie Review

Anyone interested in how movies get made will love this feisty behind-the-scenes documentary, which uses...

Black And White (1999) Movie Review

Black And White (1999) Movie Review

A very unique and brutal subculture exists in America these days. It's a strange...

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