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Brittany Murphy's 'Something Wicked' To Be Released, Other Posthumous Movie Releases


Brittany Murphy Philip Seymour Hoffman Paul Walker Heath Ledger Richard Harris Oliver Reed

Brittany Murphy’s final movie ‘Something Wicked’ is due to be released over four years since her tragic and ambiguous death. The plot focuses on a young couple who find themselves faced with a past that they had hoped would remain buried. Murphy died in 2009, after allegedly being stricken with acute pneumonia and severe anemia. The same results were found on her husband, Simon Monjack’s post mortum, when he died just five months after her.

brittany murphy something wicked Brittany Murphy looked extraordinarily thin in the months before her death

Over the past 15 years Brittany Murphy is not the only star to die before their latest project is released. Oliver Reed suffered a heart attack whilst filming Ridley Scott’s Gladiator, which came out in 2000. The movie was completed using CGI and a stunt double to finish his scenes.  Those of you who have seen the movie can appreciate quite how flawlessly this was done, it's virtually impossible to tell that Reed isn't in certain scenes.

Continue reading: Brittany Murphy's 'Something Wicked' To Be Released, Other Posthumous Movie Releases

Paul Walker And Other Actors Who Died Mid-Way Through Movie Shoots


Philip Seymour Hoffman Paul Walker Heath Ledger Aaliyah

The world was taken back by the very sudden death of Paul Walker at the end of 2013, only to hit by the sad news of Philip Seymour Hoffman’s drug overdose in early February. Both actors were well liked in their personal lives and had successful careers, similarly they also were working on incomplete projects at the time of their deaths.

hoffman actors who died Hoffman had nearly finished filming all of his scenes for The Hunger Games

Walker had begun filming scenes for the latest movie in the franchise that made him famous, Fast & Furious 7, but still had important scenes left to shoot. Sources have claimed that a large section of the script had to be rewritten in order to continue with the film after Walker’s fatal accident.

Continue reading: Paul Walker And Other Actors Who Died Mid-Way Through Movie Shoots

Ben Affleck Takes Batman Rejection In His "Big Boy" Stride


Ben Affleck Jimmy Fallon Anne Hathaway Heath Ledger Michael Keaton

Ben Affleck has finally responded to the backlash and online petition against him being the next Batman in the 2015 Zack Snyder face-off with Henry Cavill's Superman. As the petition's signatures crept past 90,000, the actor could not pretend he was unaware of the furore any longer. It was time for the Oscar-winning director to address the online tirades and bad feeling towards him.

Ben Affleck
See: It's All In His Stride.

Appearing on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon on Monday night (16th Sept), Affleck was given a platform to air his views on the tidal wave of hatred he was hit with. He revealed how he was given stern advice by Warner Bros., who told him: "don't use the internet for a few days."

Continue reading: Ben Affleck Takes Batman Rejection In His "Big Boy" Stride

Jake Gyllenhaal Still Misses Heath Ledger "To This Day"


Jake Gyllenhaal Heath Ledger

'Source Code' actor Jake Gyllenhaal has revealed that he is still struggling to get over the loss of Heath Ledger, citing the news of his 2008 death was like "losing a family member". The general public became aware of their friendship after the two actors starred alongside one another as gay lovers in the 2005 Academy Award-winning movie 'Brokeback Mountain'. Gyllenhaal has, however, revealed that their friendship first began in 2001, when they met during auditions for Baz Luhrmann's 'Moulin Rouge!' 

Related: Halloween Box Office Disappoints, As "Nightcrawler" and "Ouija" Barely Break $10,9 Million Each

US television show, 'Inside the Actors Studio' gave an interview with Gylllenhaal, where he explained his relationship with the late 'The Dark Knight' star. Gylllenhaal explained that: "Heath and I knew each other for years before ['Brokeback Mountain'] because we had both auditioned for 'Moulin Rouge!' together. And I remember thinking, 'I like this guy. He's just like, super lovable.'"

Continue reading: Jake Gyllenhaal Still Misses Heath Ledger "To This Day"

No Love For The Dark Knight Rises At This Year's Oscars


Christopher Nolan Ben Affleck Academy Of Motion Pictures And Sciences Tom Hardy Heath Ledger Anne Hathaway

Christopher Nolan's epic conclusion to the celebrated Dark Knight trilogy was released in the summer of 2012, with many critics agreeing that it was already a viable contender for Oscar season, but of the 24 categories on offer, The Dark Knight Rises didn't receive a single nod.

Everyone seems to be up in arms over Ben Affleck's omission from the Best Director category, or over Skyfall's similarly unanimous snub (although, rightly so, it has been given the nod for Best Cinematography as well as nominations for its soundtrack and editing), but it does come as quite a surprise to see so few remarks about the lack of Batman at The Oscars.

Ok, we all agree that the film maybe wasn't overall as good as its predecessor The Dark Knight, but it was still one hell of a show (and how was Tom Hardy supposed to compete with Heath Ledger's Joker). From the colossal set designs (Bane's sewer-based lair), the quite brilliant costumes on show (Catwoman and Bane's mask) and the film's deep underlying messages reflecting our own world, raising questions about class, wealth and power, has a more deserving and appropriate for our time film been made this year? You'd have to say no, not really.

Continue reading: No Love For The Dark Knight Rises At This Year's Oscars

Imagining James Bond Without Daniel Craig: Who Were The Other 007 Contenders?


After seeing Skyfall this week, Roger Moore described Daniel Craig and Sam Mendes' new James Bond film as "without a doubt... the best Bond there's ever been." The film's crew is seemingly made up entirely of Oscar winners and critical reaction has suggested that Skyfall could be the first 007 movie to win big at the Academy Awards.

Though there were murmurings of discontent when British star Daniel Craig replaced Pierce Brosnan in the secret agent franchise, he's since become a revelation, with many considering him to be the finest Bond yet. His turn in Casino Royale had far more depth than anything Brosnan (or Dalton for that matter) had delivered, leaving Bond geeks squabbling between just three actors as to who was the best Bond ever: Moore, Connery or Craig? Though Quantum of Solace failed to reach the heady critical heights of its predecessor, early reaction suggests Skyfall betters Casino Royale and possibly anything before it. But it all could have been very different, couldn't it? Cast your mind back to 2005, when the protracted process of choosing the new James Bond was reaching its final stages. With Ralph Fiennes unable to commit to the filming schedule of Casino Royale, and Jude Law, Orlando Bloom, Eric Bana and Heath Ledger discounted, producers chose to go ahead and run screen tests on the four 'finalists'. (They had lost the chance of landing Clive Owen after refusing to include gross profit points in his contract) The contenders were Layer Cake star Daniel Craig, ER actor Goran Visnjic, Australian actor Sam Worthington and 22-year-old Henry Cavill, reported Variety. All were relatively inexperienced, though producers were keen for someone considerably younger than the 52-year-old Pierce Brosnan. In fact, writer Paul Haggis told the Hollywood Reporter at the time, "We're trying to reinvent Bond. He's 28 - no Q, no gadgets."

Sam Worthington 'Wrath Of The Titans' UK film premiere

Continue reading: Imagining James Bond Without Daniel Craig: Who Were The Other 007 Contenders?

Jason Segal And Michelle Williams Shack Up In New York


Jason Segel Michelle Williams Heath Ledger

Who are our favourite Hollywood couple right now? That's right, the adorable and unassuming talent power-house couple that is Jason Segal (How I Met Your Mother, Forgetting Sarah Marshall, The Muppets) and Michelle Williams (Dawson's Creek, Brokeback Mountain). The couple, who have now been dating for 7 months, have bought a loft together in Brooklyn, NY. 

Williams and Segal have been living together for a few months, but were staving off moving into their own joint property. Williams was married to Heath Ledger, but were divorced 5 months before his tragic death. She and her daughter, Matilda, have lived in the home she and Ledge bought together ever since his death. However, with Segal entering Michelle and Matilda's lives, and providing an excellent father figure for young Matilda, it seems time for Michelle to properly move on.

Their new home is a converted loft, which has stunning views of the Manhattan skyline, according to WetPaint.com. The news of them moving in seems to confirm the idea that Segal feels he has met 'the one'. Last March he told Parade "I don't want to have a girlfriend for the sake of having a girlfriend. I have no desire to pick a random girl. I want the right girl. There are plenty of opportunities, but I would rather have the right one." He now has the right one.

Continue reading: Jason Segal And Michelle Williams Shack Up In New York

The Dark Knight Review


Excellent
Have you ever noticed how one measly letter separates "laughter" from "slaughter?"

I almost missed this off-the-cuff joke -- it's spray-painted on the side of a semi as the Joker (Heath Ledger) descends on a police convoy hustling doomed district attorney Harvey Dent (Aaron Eckhart) beneath the streets of Gotham. But it beautifully captures the balancing act director Christopher Nolan attempts in The Dark Knight, an anticipated blockbuster that seems capable at any point of plunging headlong into hilarity or insanity, moral stability or absolute chaos.

Continue reading: The Dark Knight Review

Naomi Watts Joins Heath Ledger's Family At Memorial Service


Heath Ledger Brokeback Mountain Michelle Williams Naomi Watts

Family and friends of the late Heath Ledger, including his ex-girlfriend Naomi Watts, have gathered at a memorial service for the actor.

Watts and Ledger's ex-fiancee Michelle Williams were among the mourners at the private service at the Pierce Brothers Westwood Village Memorial Park and Mortuary in Los Angeles after the Brokeback Mountain star's body was flown from New York City.

The 28-year-old was found dead in his downtown Manhattan apartment last Tuesday with an autopsy proving inconclusive as to the cause of death.

Though it was reported that prescription drugs were found in the SoHo bedroom, it has since been reported that the actor's death may have been a result of natural causes.

According to celebrity web site TMZ.com, sources "intimately connected with the investigation" have said Ledger may have died from a heart attack.

"It's now appearing that the level of toxicity (from medication) in Ledger's system was low enough that it may not have caused his death. These sources say Heath's heart stopped," the website reported.

Some 1,000 guests at the G'Day USA Australia Day Ball at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York City held a minute's silence in honour of the Perth-born actor on Saturday night.

According to Melbourne newspaper The Age, the Australian consul-general also read a letter written by the late actor's father Kim.

"Heath did not become an actor for the fame or fortune," he wrote. "He loved his craft and he loved helping his friends. He loved chess and skateboarding too."

The letter added: "My image of Heath in New York is him with his skateboard, a canvas bag and his beanie.

"That was Heath to me... Heath is and always will be an Australian."

Continue reading: Naomi Watts Joins Heath Ledger's Family At Memorial Service

Brits Julie Christie And Daniel Day-lewis Take Sag Awards


Julie Christie Alec Baldwin Brokeback Mountain Coen Brothers Edie Falco Heath Ledger James Gandolfini NBC Paul Thomas Anderson Ricky Gervais Sarah Polley The Office The Sopranos

British actors Julie Christie and Daniel Day-Lewis have won the top acting prizes at the Screen Actors' Guild (SAG) awards.

While Christie took the best actress gong for her acclaimed portrayal of a woman facing dementia in Sarah Polley's Away From Her, Day-Lewis was rewarded for his stunning role as an amoral oil prospector in Paul Thomas Anderson's There Will Be Blood.

Though the awards season has been jeopardised by the ongoing industrial action by the Writers' Guild of America (WGA), the SAG awards were held without a hitch after an interim agreement was signed between the two unions, allowing acting talent to attend the ceremony without having to cross picket lines.

Christie - who is nominated for the best actress Academy award for her part in Away From Her - paid tribute to the SAG, adding to The Associated Press: "It's lovely to receive an award from your own union, especially at a time when we're being so forcefully reminded how important unions are."

And Day-Lewis dedicated his award to the late Heath Ledger, who was tragically found dead in his New York apartment last week.

"In Brokeback Mountain he was unique, he was perfect," Day-Lewis said while accepting his trophy.

"That scene in the trailer at the end of the film is as moving as anything I think I've ever seen."

The 50-year-old added backstage that he had never met Ledger but had been profoundly affected by the actor's death.

"I thought he was beautiful. I just had a very strong feeling I would have liked him very much as a man," he said. "I admired him very much. I'm absolutely certain he would have done many wonderful things in his life."

Javier Bardem took the best supporting actor prize for his role as psychotic killer Anton Chigurh in the Coen Brothers' No Country For Old Men, which also won the award for outstanding cast in a motion picture.

With The Sopranos finally coming to an end, leads James Gandolfini and Edie Falco claimed the best actor and best actress prizes for TV dramas, while Alec Baldwin and Tina Fey, the stars of NBC's 30 Rock, took the comedy equivalents.

And another NBC series, The Office - an adaptation of Ricky Gervais and Stephen Merchant's Golden Globe-winning sitcom - won the award for best cast in a comedy programme.

Continue reading: Brits Julie Christie And Daniel Day-lewis Take Sag Awards

I'm Not There Review


Essential
We first meet the real Bob Dylan, lit by a spotlight and blowing into a harmonica with his eyes turned ever-downward, at the very end of Todd Haynes' I'm Not There. (The footage comes from a concert filmed in the 1960's.) Though there are six evocations of our hero's persona and dozens of references to his words and images, his actual visage is kept under lock and key until the solemn credits. To Haynes, the mystery of who the man is behind closed doors should stay that way: Behind closed doors tends to be pretty tedious if not downright boring. It's more fun to extrapolate: In the open valleys of cultural myth, a celebrity can become any number of things.

At first, he's a young, train-hopping wanderer who has taken the name Woody (Marcus Carl Franklin), from his hero Woody Guthrie. He also plays a guitar with "This Machine Kills Fascism" painted on it. Later, the man appears as an aged Billy the Kid (Richard Gere) who can't understand why the locals are being bullied out of their land by a decrepit Pat Garrett (Bruce Greenwood). Fitfully, the sequences are shot in the dusty browns of Peckinpah and the hippie westerns of the late 1960s and 1970s. Both stories, along with the others, are consistently interrupted by a press conference with poet Arthur Rimbaud (Ben Whishaw), who speaks in a particularly American sarcasm while scrutinizing everyone who questions him, half-mumbling with cigarette in hand.

Continue reading: I'm Not There Review

Heath Ledger Monday 25th June 2007 out walking in Midtown Manhattan New York City, USA

Heath Ledger

Two Hands Review


Excellent
Writer/director Gregor Jordan's Two Hands is a brilliant little film; what we Aussies might call a "ripper." Preceding the more sophisticated Aussie thriller Chopper by just a year, it announced the beginning of the Australian film industry's obsession with crime. Not quite as stylish as Dirty Deeds or as hilarious as Gettin' Square, Two Hands deals well in both these traits, adding to the mix grit, suspense, and true romance.

Jimmy (Heath Ledger) works as a doorman at a strip club in the infamous Kings Cross area of Sydney. "The Cross" is the kind of place where trouble of the criminal kind is perfectly unavoidable, and Jimmy has trouble avoiding it. When asked by crime kingpin Pando (Bryan Brown) to deliver $10,000 to a unit in Bondi, Jimmy sees himself moving up in the world. When he loses the money on a disappointingly unromantic errand and it is stolen by a pair of Dickensian street kids, Jimmy knows he is a dead man. His only chance is to hook up with his dead brother's ex-gang and rob a bank to make the money back. As Pando's goons, including Acko (David Field) and Wally (Tom Long), hunt Jimmy down, the film races tensely to a climax that will decide his fate.

Continue reading: Two Hands Review

The Four Feathers Review


Weak
In grade school, history lessons were painfully boring, but at least we learned the facts. I wish the same could be said for history lessons found in today's movies. Last year, Pearl Harbor wasted an opportunity to study the December 7 invasion - rather, it chose to pursue a useless love triangle. The Four Feathers is nothing more than an equally bad retread of Pearl Harbor. It has little to do with the history regarding British colonialism it seeks to explore; in fact, I doubt the film is even historically accurate. And, like the details of the Japanese attack in Pearl Harbor, the historical events in The Four Feathers only exist to provide the framework for the telling of a predictable and implausible romance.

Harry Faversham (Heath Ledger), a soldier with the British Army, is unwilling to travel into the Sudan with the rest of his regimen to protect British interests there. So, he resigns his commission. In response, Harry's fellow soldiers issue him three feathers symbolizing his cowardice for leaving. Looking for support, he turns to his father (a former military officer), who disowns him. As well, his fiancé Ethne (Kate Hudson), who provides a fourth feather and calls off their engagement. Unable to cope with the harsh reactions his decision prompts, Harry hastily departs for the Sudan to find a way to help his friends and redeem his honor.

Continue reading: The Four Feathers Review

Lords Of Dogtown Review


Weak
"Lords of Dogtown" is a fictionalized accountof the birth of modern skateboarding that doesn't have half the spontaneityand maverick spirit of the vivid, kinetic, crowd-pleasing documentary thatinspired it.

2002's "Dogtownand Z-Boys" (now available in an excellentDVD) was an adrenaline-rush history of the Zephyr Skateboarding Team, adaredevil band of teenage surf bums who were the first to take wave-ridingmoves to the streets and empty swimming pools of drought-stricken SantaMonica in the early 1970s.

This handful of young turks (oneof whom became the director of that film andthe writer of this one) invented the board-gripping, back-scratching, wall-climbingstyle that launched the entire rebel culture of extreme sports -- but youwouldn't know it from "Lords of Dogtown," which concerns itselfmore with fabricated love triangles, unhappy home lives and rivalries thatformed when fame came calling.

While the performances of the young cast members -- keyZ-Boys are played by John Robinson from "Elephant,"Emile Hirsch from "TheGirl Next Door" and Victor Rasuk from "RaisingVictor Vargas" -- are multifaceted, they sometimes have the under-rehearsedfeel of a bawdier after-school special. Or maybe that's just the clumsyexpository dialogue: "Hey, I think we should start a skateboard team,man," says one shirtless, long-haired dude to another. "There'smoney in this!"

Continue reading: Lords Of Dogtown Review

A Knight's Tale Review


Good

By now you've heard about the concept of "A Knight's Tale" and had the time to become justifiably dubious. A 14th Century jousting adventure set to the tune of guitar rock stadium anthems? How could that possibly be anything short of laughable?

The answer is -- well, I don't know exactly. But when, five minutes into the movie, a crowd of peasants at a jousting tournament starts stomping feet in time and bellowing "We will/We will/Rock You!" (and soon thereafter do "the wave"), I defy you not to grin an aw-what-the-heck grin and go along for the ride.

The story itself isn't much more than a dressed-up, time-warped sports underdog yarn, in which the lowborn hero ("The Patriot's" jaunty Heath Ledger) poses as a knight (only those of noble birth are allowed to compete) and becomes the toast of the jousting world. But in the hands of writer-director Brian Helgeland (who helmed "Payback" and co-wrote "L.A. Confidential"), the movie's cliché-spawn chassis is merely a jumping-off point for a jocular, undeflatable, high energy theme-park ride of action, wisecracks and romance.

Continue reading: A Knight's Tale Review

Ned Kelly Review


Weak

Plied with fiction and short on depth, the new biopic of legendary Australian outlaw Ned Kelly plays like "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" without the excitement, charm and humor.

Bearded and brooding but otherwise uncharismatic, Heath Ledger stars as the folk-hero bushranger (Aussie for "cowboy"), who according to this film was an upstanding citizen of the Outback frontier until contemptible, crooked, downright sinister lawmen drove him to a life of crime by picking on his family.

They jailed his ma, molested his teenage sister, and falsely accused him and his brothers of horse rustling. They "started a war" against us, Kelly says in voice-over. "So I killed their coppers. I robbed their banks."

Continue reading: Ned Kelly Review

10 Things I Hate About You Review


OK



There's just no excuse for making a Shakespeare knock-off with "Savedby the Bell" quality dialogue. When a movie modernizes The Bard, evenif it's set it in a high school, the chief obligation is to dialogue aboveall else.

"10 Things I Hate About You" -- a "Clueless"-spawnremake of "The Taming of the Shrew" -- while an above averageentry in the recent pool of teen-targeted pics, is sorely lacking in thisarena.

Penned by two office temps-cum-screenwriters and directedby a feature film rookie (Gil Junger) as well, "10 Things" isa bright idea (I'm always an advocate of fiddling with Shakespeare), butit is an interpretation without poetry or rhythm, occasionally cashingin on multi-syllabic, Scrabble-winning words in a misguided attempt tomake its characters look rebelliously intellectual.

Continue reading: 10 Things I Hate About You Review

The Order Review


Weak

The Catholic church has been a source of inspiration for a whole slew of scary movies -- everything from goosepimpling tales of possession like "The Exorcist" to fact-based stories of institutionalized horror like the current art-house hit "The Magdalene Sisters."

But mostly these scary movies have not been all that frightening. In fact, mostly they've been forgettably cheap-fright thrillers that make up their own mythology, then dress it up in cassocks and clerical collars for mock-credibility, much like "The Order."

This dark supernatural thriller about a brooding young man of the cloth (lumpy-featured heartthrob Heath Ledger) in the midst of a major crisis of faith (there's this girl, see...) is loosely based on an archaic con offered to ex-communicated sinners on their deathbeds in Medieval times: Someone calling himself a "sin eater" would perform a ceremony in which, for a price, he would assume all the dying person's transgressions and guilt so he or she would be free to enter Heaven.

Continue reading: The Order Review

The Four Feathers Review


Terrible

All sweeping desert vistas and melodramatic 19th Century British imperial clichés (updated with politically correct tisk-tisking, of course), Shekhar Kapur's "The Four Feathers" is a hollow-hearted epic for the sake of an epic.

The tedious seventh film adaptation of A.E.W. Manson's turn-of-the-Century flag-waving war novel about the heroic redemption of craven English army officer, the film stars Heath Ledger ("A Knight's Tale," "Monster's Ball") as Harry Feversham, a highly respected young soldier who resigns his commission -- for reasons related to panic, not principle -- just as his regiment is being shipped off for the first time to battle Sudanese rebels.

"I never wanted to join the army," he whines. "I did it for my father. I thought I'd serve out my commission a year or two."

Continue reading: The Four Feathers Review

The Patriot Review


OK

For a relentlessly unoriginal, pandering and predictable, two-and-a-half hour Revolutionary War epic that white-washes slavery, chooses exaggerated slow-motion action over any interest in historical accuracy and is helmed by a director who has demonstrated little talent for anything but overblown textbook filmmaking, "The Patriot" isn't a bad movie.

It's a mimeographed knock-off of "Braveheart" in buckskin vests and powdered wigs, but that doesn't seem to bother Mel Gibson, who won an Oscar for directing that film and stars in this one as another tread-upon colonial who takes up arms against England for his nation's freedom.

A hero of the French and Indian War who has since pledged to raise his children as a pacifist plantation farmer in South Carolina, Benjamin Martin (Gibson) is an amalgam of real revolutionary war figures, fantasized by screenwriter Robert Rodat ("Saving Private Ryan") as a politically correct hero who is a wonderful widower father, who communes with the natives (he's versed in the deadly use of a Tomahawk hatchet), who employs his plantation workers instead of enslaving them, and who takes up arms again only after a stuffy, sadistic redcoat Colonel named Tavington (Jason Issacs) kills one of his sons in cold blood when he finds Martin's home filled with rebel soldiers receiving first aid after a battle.

Continue reading: The Patriot Review

Heath Ledger

Heath Ledger Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Music Comments Quotes RSS

Heath Ledger

Date of birth

4th April, 1979

Date of death

22nd January, 2008

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.85


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Heath Ledger Movies

The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus Trailer

The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus Trailer

Watch the trailer for The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus Doctor Parnassus is a doctor unlike...

The Dark Knight Movie Review

The Dark Knight Movie Review

Have you ever noticed how one measly letter separates "laughter" from "slaughter?"I almost missed this...

I'm Not There Movie Review

I'm Not There Movie Review

We first meet the real Bob Dylan, lit by a spotlight and blowing into a...

I'm Not There Trailer

I'm Not There Trailer

I'm Not ThereTrailerI'm Not There is an unconventional journey into the life and times of...

The Four Feathers Movie Review

The Four Feathers Movie Review

In grade school, history lessons were painfully boring, but at least we learned the facts....

Lords of Dogtown Movie Review

Lords of Dogtown Movie Review

"Lords of Dogtown" is a fictionalized accountof the birth of modern skateboarding that doesn't have...

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A Knight's Tale Movie Review

A Knight's Tale Movie Review

By now you've heard about the concept of "A Knight's Tale" and had the time...

Ned Kelly Movie Review

Ned Kelly Movie Review

Plied with fiction and short on depth, the new biopic of legendary Australian outlaw Ned...

10 Things I Hate About You Movie Review

10 Things I Hate About You Movie Review

There's just no excuse for making a Shakespeare knock-off with "Savedby the Bell" quality dialogue....

The Order Movie Review

The Order Movie Review

The Catholic church has been a source of inspiration for a whole slew of scary...

The Four Feathers Movie Review

The Four Feathers Movie Review

All sweeping desert vistas and melodramatic 19th Century British imperial clichés (updated with politically correct...

The Patriot Movie Review

The Patriot Movie Review

For a relentlessly unoriginal, pandering and predictable, two-and-a-half hour Revolutionary War epic that white-washes slavery,...

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