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Collateral Beauty Review

OK

Dramas exploring the nature of death and the true meaning of life are always in danger of tipping over into extreme sentimentality, and this one very quickly gets bogged down in buckets of syrup. It's a slickly made movie with a first-rate cast, but occasional glimpses of gritty honesty aren't quite enough to counteract sudsy philosophising that sounds profound but is actually rather shallow.

It's set in New York, where advertising company owner Howard (Will Smith) is still lost in grief six months after the death of his 6-year-old daughter. And his business partners are worried that the company is falling apart as a result. In desperation, best pal Whit (Edward Norton), protege Claire (Kate Winslet) and rising-star Simon (Michael Pena) hire a private detective (Ann Dowd) to determine Howard's mental fitness to run the company. They also hire three actors to confront him as Love (Keira Knightley), Time (Jacob Latimore) and Death (Helen Mirren), abstract concepts he's obsessed with. But they don't know that Howard is also considering attending a grief counselling meeting run by Madeleine (Naomie Harris).

Directed with a magical sheen by David Frankel (Hope Springs) and written to within an inch of its life by Allan Loeb (The Switch), there's nothing about this film that doesn't feel contrived and controlled. In addition to their scenes with Howard, each of the three actors has an impact on the colleague who needs their specific gifts. And there are a number of revelations and twists that feel annoyingly hokey. Even so, the cast is strong enough to add moments of lightness that lift the movie briefly out of the sludge. Mirren, Knightley and Latimore have a sparky edge as the story's catalysts. While Norton, Winslet and Pena bring some raw, honest emotion to their own personal dramas.

Continue reading: Collateral Beauty Review

Collateral Beauty Trailer


Love, time and death connect every single human being on earth, we long for love, wish we had more time and we fear death. Howard Inlet was once one of New York's most sought after advertising exec's but after suffering a great personal loss, his life has been left in ruins.

Now all his friends can do is look on and see a man who once loved life now living each day wishing the end would come. To help deal with his grief, Howard writes letters to 'time', 'love' and 'death' in the hope that he'll eventually understand why he has lost so much. With a little help from his friends, Howard finds himself actually receiving answers to some of the questions he asks in his letters and hopefully finds a way to live beyond just existing.

Collateral Beauty is directed by David Frankel with a screenplay written by Allan Loeb.

Edward Norton Produced Documentary 'My Own Man' Set To Debut On Netflix


Edward Norton Netflix

Edward Norton joins the team of David Sampliner's poignant forthcoming documentary 'My Own Man' as executive producer, as it prepares to air exclusively on Netflix this Spring having premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival last year.

Netflix logo

Academy Award nominated actor Norton returns to film production with 'My Own Man', having previously worked on the Primetime Emmy winning documentary 'By the People: The Election of Barack Obama'. This new movie, a Netflix Original Documentary, is a little more personal, detailing the ever changing relationships between fathers and their sons, as it follows director Sampliner's difficult journey into parenthood.

Continue reading: Edward Norton Produced Documentary 'My Own Man' Set To Debut On Netflix

Spoiler Alert! Ten Of Our Favourite Movie Plot Twists


Edward Norton Kevin Spacey

There's nothing quite like a great plot twist to make for an unforgettable movie moment. Some we can all agree were truely unexpected, others, well there's always going to be someone who say they saw it coming. But whether you were happily taken by surprise or felt you were taken for a ride, it's nice to be thrown a curveball by Hollywood once in a while. Here's ten of our favourite plot twists - how many did you really see coming?

Kevin SpeceyKevin Spacey fooled us all in The Usual Suspects

The Usual Suspects

Continue reading: Spoiler Alert! Ten Of Our Favourite Movie Plot Twists

The Grand Budapest Hotel: 10 Reasons You NEED To See This Film


Ralph Fiennes Wes Anderson Tony Revolori Saoirse Ronan Edward Norton

Wes Anderson’s ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’ has already received praise from critics and is being held up as one of the director’s finest pieces of work. Still, if you're not convinced as to why you need to go see it here are ten reasons to get you to the cinema this weekend.

The Grand Budapest Hotel'The Grand Budapest Hotel'

1. It’s classic Wes Anderson

Continue reading: The Grand Budapest Hotel: 10 Reasons You NEED To See This Film

Tonight's Cinema Plans? A No-Brainer: Wes Anderson's The Grand Budapest Hotel


Wes Anderson Owen Wilson Edward Norton

March isn’t generally a good time for cinemagoers. Post Oscars, you’ll rarely find yourself torn between films when making your ticket buying decisions, and tonight is no different, with 300: Rise of an Empire, Bullet and The Grand Budapest Hotel vying for your attention. The decision is an easy one: it’s Wes Anderson every time.

Grand Budapest HotelM. Gustave's relationship with his lobby boy Zero is funny and endearing

The ‘alternative Hollywood’ director is back to his best with Grand Budapest Hotel, which sees Ralph Feinnes play the finicky, charming and astute M. Gustave whose life gets muddled when one of his many sexual conquests leaves him a painting, opening up a world of jealousy, backstabbing and hijinks – all of this amidst the backdrop of war.

Continue reading: Tonight's Cinema Plans? A No-Brainer: Wes Anderson's The Grand Budapest Hotel

The Grand Budapest Hotel Review


Essential

Wes Anderson's entertaining filmmaking style clicks beautifully into focus for this comical adventure. Films like The Darjeeling Limited and Moonrise Kingdom are packed with amazing detail and terrific characters, but this movie is on another level entirely: fast, smart and engaging, packed with both silly slapstick and intelligent gags. And the sprawling cast is simply wonderful.

It's a story within a story within a story, as an author (Wilkinson) narrates the tale of his 1968 conversation as a young writer (Law) with ageing hotelier Zero (Abraham), who in turn recounts his life as a lobby boy in 1932. Young Zero (Revolori) learned his craft alongside legendary concierge Gustave (Fiennes) at the Grand Budapest Hotel somewhere in Middle Europe, and stuck by Gustave's side when he became embroiled in an inheritance battle with a spoiled heir (Brody) and his evil henchman (Dafoe). As things get increasingly nasty, Zero and his baker girlfriend (Ronan) help Gustave fight for justice, and when that doesn't work he helps orchestrate an elaborate prison escape. Meanwhile, war breaks out twice across Europe.

The double flashback structure makes this a film about the power of storytelling itself, and even more potent is the reminder that we need to remember the old ways, especially as the world changes around us. This simple idea is woven so cleverly into the DNA of the script that it continually takes our breath away, conveying the true importance of history and nostalgia. At the centre, Fiennes gives his best-ever performance, showing a real gift for comedy (who knew?) as he makes the bristly Gustave deeply likeable. His camaraderie with newcomer Revolori is priceless, as are the cameos from an array of Anderson veterans including Murray, Wilson and the always astonishing Swinton.

Continue reading: The Grand Budapest Hotel Review

The Grand Budapest Hotel - Featurettes


The cast and crew of 'The Grand Budapest Hotel' discuss the story, the main characters' relationship and the duties of the concierge in the latest featurettes for the movie.

Continue: The Grand Budapest Hotel - Featurettes

Grand Budapest Hotel - Clip


Gustave may be aloof and snobbish in many ways, but he's also extremely charming with a good heart and a titanic personality. As result he makes for a highly popular concierge at the Grand Budapest Hotel, who regularly entertains guests in more ways than one. He is charged with training up an inexperienced young lobby boy named Zero Moustafa who he soon bonds with. When one of his one night stands, the elderly Madame D, is found murdered in her hotel room, Zero is first by his side to defend him against her family and the authorities who are quick to accuse Gustave of the crime. Things become more intense when her will reveals her wish to bestow a valuable painting to her lover, entitled Boy With Apple, and Gustave and Zero are forced to flee. However, they are not alone as Zero falls for an attractive guest named Agatha who helps them hide the painting while Gustave protests his innocence.

Continue: Grand Budapest Hotel - Clip

Some Genius Edited Out Tyler Durden From 'Fight Club' [Video]


Brad Pitt Edward Norton

If you know Fight Club, and you really should, then you’ll know that Tyler Durden is just a figure of Edward Norton’s imagination, created to escape the mundane domesticity of his life, even though his life takes place in a cyber-punk* dystopian city.

Fight Club minus Tyler Durden from Richard Trammell on Vimeo.

Continue reading: Some Genius Edited Out Tyler Durden From 'Fight Club' [Video]

The Grand Budapest Hotel - Clips


Charismatic but somewhat aloof concierge at the Grand Budapest Hotel, Gustave H, is less than impressed when a seemingly inexperienced new lobby boy named Zero Moustafa is hired for a trial period without his knowledge. However, the pair become thick as thieves when Gustave finds himself wanted by the authorities after the murder of his elderly one night stand Madame D. He does what any honourable hotelier would do under pressure. and runs. When it is discovered that the woman had left a priceless painting behind for Gustave in her will named Boy With Apple, her family is furious and Zero helps to the keep the painting hidden with the help of a charming young girl named Agatha as Gustave attempts to protest his innocence. With enough people despising Gustave for his often inappropriate professional conduct, it becomes harder than expected to clear his name and find out the truth about the death of Madame D.

Continue: The Grand Budapest Hotel - Clips

The Grand Budapest Hotel - Character Promo Trailer


Gustave H is a charismatic and over-friendly concierge at the Grand Budapest Hotel whose conduct has been far from professional over the course of his career, regularly engaging in one night stands with his deeply charmed guests including the elderly Madame D. So enamoured was Madame D about Gustave's interest in her, that she leaves him a priceless painting behind in her will named Boy With Apple. However, following her suspicious death, her maddened son Dmitri accuses Gustave of her murder and attempts to frame him for it, angered by his illicit involvement with her. Meanwhile, Gustave is attempting to train up an enthusiastic young lobby boy named Zero Moustafa who warms to him easily and helps to defend him as Gustave makes a break for it. Moustafa is also becoming very fond of a girl named Agatha, who he enlists to help hide the painting from Madame D's furious family.

Continue: The Grand Budapest Hotel - Character Promo Trailer

Video - New Cast Additions Amy Poehler And Tina Fey At 'Anchorman 2' NY Premiere - Part 4


'Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues' stars Amy Poehler and Tina Fey are snapped on the red carpet at the New York premiere held at the Beacon Theatre. The comediennes are new additions to the cast which also sees the return of the old news team led by Will Ferrell.

Continue: Video - New Cast Additions Amy Poehler And Tina Fey At 'Anchorman 2' NY Premiere - Part 4

'The Grand Budapest Hotel' - Meet Wes Anderson's Gang [Trailer + Pictures]


Owen Wilson Adrien Brody Wes Anderson Ralph Fiennes Jeff Goldblum Tilda Swinton Willem Dafoe Harvey Keitel Jason Schwartzman Edward Norton

Wes Anderson’s brand of frenetic, witty energy is bursting from the seams in the new trailer for The Grand Budapest Hotel. The comedy drama centres on a hotel concierge’s unlikely friendship with a lobby boy, and, as you’ve come to expect with an Anderson film, features an array of brilliant talent in its ranks.

The trailer for the film, which is due for release on March 7th in the U.S; February 28th in the U.K, is reminiscent of every film in Anderson’s showreel, but most notably, The Darjeeling Limited.

Some might see similarities to the hotel in The Royal TenenbaumsThe Grand Budapest Hotel - Some might see similarities to the hotel in The Royal Tenenbaums

Continue reading: 'The Grand Budapest Hotel' - Meet Wes Anderson's Gang [Trailer + Pictures]

The Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer


Gustave H is a flamboyant and largely charismatic concierge at the Grand Budapest Hotel whose habit of getting a little too close to his guests and keeping them entertained at all hours has earned him legendary status among many of his peers. When he meets enthusiastic young lobby boy Zero Moustafa, Gustave trains him to be the best hotel worker he can and the pair become thick as thieves as they try and defend each other at all costs. When one of his more 'special' guests is found murdered, police accuse Gustave who does what any upstanding gentleman would do - runs. To the anger of the guest's son, he is bequeathed a valuable painting known as 'Boy With Apple' and now he finds himself on a cat and mouse chase with the victim's family and the police. Meanwhile, Zero meets the charming Agatha, who he's also desperate to protect as best he can.

'The Grand Budapest Hotel' is a heartwarming comedy about a very unusual friendship, directed and written by Wes Anderson ('Fantastic Mr. Fox', 'Rushmore', 'The Royal Tenenbaums'). It is based in 1920s Europe and truly reflects the glamour of the privileged in that decade. The movie is due to be released in the UK on February 28th 2014.

Click here to read - The Grand Budapest Hotel Movie Review

Ed Norton Gets Help From Alec Baldwin And Miley Cyrus During Opening 'SNL' Monologue


Edward Norton Alec Baldwin Miley Cyrus Wes Anderson Janelle Monae

Ed Norton isn't exactly known for his comedic chops, so when he appeared as host on this week's Saturday Night Live - the first time he has hosted the long-running show - he was happy to take all the help he could get. It was a good think that show veteran Alec Baldwin and recent host Miley Cyrus were on hand to dish out some advice for him as he burst his SNL cherry.

Ed Norton
Norton made his debut on the show

It was a great lead in to the show - one that could have been better if it wasn't for Cyrus' poorly received butting-in and tongue joke - as the three joked around, shared tips (Alec is a 15-time presenter on the show) and plugged whatever new ventures they have on the horizon (for Baldwin, it was his new MSNBC show, whilst Miley talked about her 2014 tour). And for such an amusing lead, the show even managed to keep up the funny until the end, a sad rarity for recent shows.

Continue reading: Ed Norton Gets Help From Alec Baldwin And Miley Cyrus During Opening 'SNL' Monologue

Pitt Back As Tyler Durden? Chuck Palahniuk Writing 'Fight Club' Sequel


Brad Pitt Edward Norton

Chuck Palahniuk has confirmed he is writing a sequel to his classic novel Fight Club, updating the story ten years after we last caught up with Tyler Durden and The Narrator. The American writer shared the news at the Ode to Nerds panel discussion, held as part of Comic-Con International in San Diego.

"It will of course be dark and messy," Palahniuk confirmed, "Nowadays, Tyler is telling the story, lurking inside Jack, and ready to launch a comeback. Jack is oblivious. Marla is bored. Their marriage has run aground on the rocky coastline of middle-aged suburban boredom. It's only when their little boy disappears, kidnapped by Tyler, that Jack is dragged back into the world of Mayhem."

Palanhiuk's next publications will be Doomed, coming on October 8, and Beautiful You, an comic/erotic thriller set 2014, though he said the Fight Club sequel (in graphic form) might be ready for publication in 2015.

Continue reading: Pitt Back As Tyler Durden? Chuck Palahniuk Writing 'Fight Club' Sequel

JK Rowling's 'The Cuckoo's Calling' And Other Famous Authors Who Suffered Publisher's Rejection


Jk Rowling Stephen King Jude Law Brad Pitt Edward Norton Harry Potter

J.K. Rowling's latest work, The Cuckoo's Calling, was turned down by at least one publisher. Yesterday (Sunday 14th July), Kate Mills of Orion publishing house admitted she had rejected the novel. This was following Rowling's admittance that she had penned the crime novel written under the male pseudonym 'Robert Galbraith'.

JK RowlingJ.K.Rowling at the premiere of Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows: Part 2.

Rowling's first work Harry Potter And The Philosopher's Stone was initially turned down by publishing powerhouse Bloomsbury. The company eventually did pick up the novel and the subsequent series. The Harry Potter books have been translated in 64 languages and remain the bestselling series in history. 

Continue reading: JK Rowling's 'The Cuckoo's Calling' And Other Famous Authors Who Suffered Publisher's Rejection

Edward Norton "Thrilled And Excited" After Becoming A Father


Edward Norton Shauna Robertson

Edward Norton has become a father for the first time after his fiancee Shauna Robertson gave birth to a healthy baby boy in March, multiple sources tell Us Weekly. The pair, who got engaged in 2011 following six years together, are said to be "thrilled and excited for parenthood."

Norton - arguably one of the world's greatest actors despite a patchy career in Hollywood - has never publically addressed his engagement, nor did he comment on Robertson's pregnancy or the eventual birth. In fact, it was only last month that Us Weekly broke news of the Canadian film producer's pregnancy. 

Norton is perhaps best known for his excellent turns in Primal Fear, American History X, Fight Club, Kingdom of Heaven and 25th Hour, though his career is blighted by the likes of Death to Smoochy and Keeping the Faith. Nevertheless, he returned to form in Wes Anderson's Moonrise Kingdom and is currently working on 'Birdman', Alejandro González Iñárritu's movie about a washed up actor who must overcome his ego and family trouble as he prepares to mount a Broadway play in a bid to reclaim past glory. It co-stars Emma Stone, Zach Galifianakis and Naomi Watts.

Continue reading: Edward Norton "Thrilled And Excited" After Becoming A Father

Timber! How The Mighty Fall: This Week, Edward Furlong


Edward Furlong Arnold Schwarzenegger Edward Norton

Remember Edward Furlong? The hugely promising actor who broke through as John Connor in Terminator 2? Well, if you've heard of him, you're probably aware he hasn't had the best couple of years. His personal problems reached a crescendo on Tuesday morning (October 30, 2012) when arrested for felony domestic violence at LAX airport.

According to law enforcement sources who spoke with TMZ.com, Furlong allegedly got physical with his girlfriend at around 1am, grabbing her arm during an argument at the airport. When officers arrived, she had visible marks on her arm and the actor was immediately taken into custody. At the moment, he's still sitting in jail, though bail has been set at $50,000.

Furlong has had a funny old career, which began after he scooped a flurry of awards for his performance alongside Arnold Schwarzenegger in Terminator 2. He followed it up with a couple of decent turns in indie flicks like Before and After and Little Odessa. In 1993, Aerosmith decided against featuring Alicia Silverstone in their video for 'Livin' on the Edge' (she had appeared in all other videos for Get a Grip) choosing Furlong instead. After several more movie roles, he delivered arguably his finest role in American History X, alongside Edward Norton. He played the younger brother of a neo-Nazi who is released from prison. The role landed Furlong a Young Artist Award nomination for Best Performance in a Feature Film, though he eventually lost out to Star Trek: Insurrection's Michael Welch. And then thing started to go wrong.

Continue reading: Timber! How The Mighty Fall: This Week, Edward Furlong

The Bourne Legacy Review


Good
Writer Gilroy adds directing to his Bourne chores, shifting the franchise into a cerebral thriller punctuated by plodding action sequences. It's watchable, but doesn't have enough sense of character or purpose to make us care about anything that happens.

Genetically altered government agent Aaron Cross (Renner) is part of Outcome, a parallel programme to Treadstone, which created Jason Bourne. Since Bourne's antics have lifted the lid on Treadstone, Outcome director Eric (Norton) decides to terminate his programme by brutally killing everyone involved. But Aaron slips through the net, as does geneticist Marta (Weisz), whom Aaron needs for the meds that keep him going. As Eric's team hunts them down, they head to Manila to find a solution.

Continue reading: The Bourne Legacy Review

The Bourne Legacy Trailer


The CIA is confronted with the consequences of previous events that have taken place involving Jason Bourne. They decide that they must shut down Operation Outcome (the subsequent operation to Operation Treadstone) which will involve the assassination of Outcome agent Aaron Cross and Doctor Stephanie Snyder who helped produce the agents. They must find an escape or be killed.

Continue: The Bourne Legacy Trailer

Moonrise Kingdom Review


Excellent
Anderson's films definitely aren't to everyone's taste, with his quirky approach to direction, character and and story structure. But this gently engaging adventure is his warmest, wittiest film since The Life Aquatic. It keeps us smiling all the way through.

Scout leader Ward (Norton) sends out a search party when preteen scout Sam (Gilman) runs away from the camp. He can't get far on this New England island, and it turns out that he has run off with Suzy (Hayward) daughter of a local couple (Murray and McDormand). As Sam and Suzy's naive love blossoms in the wilderness, local police Captain Sharp (Willis) takes over the search and calls in Social Services (Swinton). But these kids are more tenacious than anyone expects.

Continue reading: Moonrise Kingdom Review

Moonrise Kingdom Trailer


In 1960's New England, Sam and Suzy meet after the former sneaks backstage before a show, which features the latter. The pair fall in love and, from then on, communicate by writing letters. The pair makes a pact to run away together. Sam will escape from his summer camp and Suzy will climb out of her bedroom window.

Continue: Moonrise Kingdom Trailer

Frida Review


Very Good
After withstanding a decade of development, a race between two competing projects, and the mural-sized egos of Jennifer Lopez and Madonna, a film biography of Frida Kahlo has finally made it to the screen. Who would have guessed that a film about a mustachioed, Mexican woman with a peg leg and an overweight, Communist husband would generate so much interest? Nevertheless Frida's producers, including star Salma Hayek, somehow prevented this unique story from becoming a disastrous vanity project and ended up with an unlikely Hollywood film.

Frida Kahlo's (Salma Hayek) first meeting with Diego Rivera (Alfred Molina) and her injury in a horrible bus accident set in motion the two major forces behind Frida. Bedridden for months in a full-body cast, the young Frida keeps herself busy--and learns to express her internal passions and pain--through drawing and painting. Falling in with the womanizing Rivera and his bohemian cadre of artists and revolutionaries deepens Frida's commitment to her painting and life with the loyal but philandering muralist. Their art carries them from Mexico to New York and back in the company of such impressive historical figures as David Alfaro Siqueiros (Antonio Banderas), Nelson Rockefeller (Ed Norton), and Leon Trotsky (Geoffery Rush).

Continue reading: Frida Review

25th Hour Review


Extraordinary
If you were to write a screenplay about a drug dealer who has just 24 hours of freedom left before he begins a seven-year prison sentence, what would you have him do? Repent? Fashion an elaborate escape? Have plenty of sex? That's probably why you haven't authored any Oscar-quality screenplays lately. Writer David Benioff, on the other hand, is likely to see a little golden statuette up close next year for his work on 25th Hour, a remarkable new film based on his novel of the same name.

Neither tearjerker nor suspenseful crime drama, 25th Hour is extraordinary in that it avoids all the clichés that such a premise so often invites. It is instead a carefully focused character study about a charismatic but condemned man who must come to grips with his sentence before morning. Edward Norton plays Montgomery Brogan, the felon in question. He spends his last free hours visiting his father (Brian Cox) and attending a going away party in his honor at a New York nightclub. In tow are his girlfriend (Rosario Dawson) and his two childhood pals, Frank (Barry Pepper) and Jakob (Philip Seymour Hoffman) -- the latter of which is so perfectly cast that you can't help but chuckle the first time you see Hoffman give his usual dyspeptic sneer, signaling that he is disgusted not only with his high school English students but essentially the entire outcome of his life.

Continue reading: 25th Hour Review

Death To Smoochy Review


Bad
Classic children's television show hosts like Mister Rogers and Barney make great role models for children, but their trite style makes them easy targets for adult jokes. Danny DeVito's latest project, Death to Smoochy, is well-intended with its mockery of children's television and those inane hosts, however it is completely misdirected in its efforts to be funny.

After the obnoxious but popular host Rainbow Randolph (Robin Williams) is caught taking bribes from parents who want their kids on television, network head Frank Stokes (Jon Stewart) pulls the plug on his show. An exhaustive search through the downtrodden Barney wannabes to replace Randolph yields a pink, squeaky-clean rhino named Smoochy (Edward Norton), who becomes an overnight success with the kids despite his preachings of bland politically correct messages to children. Despite Smoochy's best wishes, his boss Nora (Catherine Keener) wants to cash in on the show's newfound success by selling Smoochy-sponsored cereals, cola, and string cheese. Randolph, on the other hand, is hell-bent on making life miserable for the rhino, and Smoochy's crooked agent (Danny DeVito) is busy making backdoor deals trying to sell Smoochy out to the mob.

Continue reading: Death To Smoochy Review

Edward Norton Didn't Want Credit For 'Kingdom Of Heaven' Character


Edward Norton Orlando Bloom Ridley Scott

'Fight Club' star Edward Norton doesn't think that his role in 'Kingdom of Heaven' should have been credited, in order to add mystery to the character. Norton portrays King Baldwin in the Ridley Scott epic - the masked king of Jerusalem afflicted with leprosy. The 'Best Actor' and 'Best Supporting Actor' nominee believes, however, that if the role had gone uncredited, it would have added to the characterisation of Orlando Bloom's lead role.

Related: Ed Norton Explains Birdman's Intricate Connection To The Entertainment Industry

Norton explained the reasons behind these thoughts to 'Empire' magazine, saying: "I didn't want to be billed because Orlando Bloom's character keeps hearing about him. There's this anticipation, this big mystery about him. It's the whole point. And it was a free trip to Morocco!"

Kingdom Of Heaven Review


Weak

For almost five years now, Hollywood studios have beentrying to duplicate the success of "Gladiator"by making the same big-budget historical battle epic over ("TheLast Samurai") and over ("Troy")and over ("KingArthur") and over ("Alexander").

Each movie has re-imagined history from a modern, let's-keep-an-open-mindperspective and hewed to a shopworn formula in which the hero rallies hismen against great odds and for a greater good. He invariably leads theminto the same blood-and-mud war scenes, which are always shot in the samestaccato slow-motion that characterizes the chaos of combat but forgetsthe audience needs to be kept abreast of who is winning. The hero alsoalways finds time to romance a beautiful woman from another culture.

Aside from having different casts, the only significantvariations between these films seem to be 1) whether the hero was of noblebirth or came up from nothing to become a great leader, and 2) whetherthe battlefields are green and forested or brown and sandy. One thing mostof them definitely have in common is that they've bombed at the box office.

Continue reading: Kingdom Of Heaven Review

Frida Review


Good

Most movies about the lives of famous artists never provide a true sense of what drove the person's creativity. Even in a strongly acted, strongly directed biopic like 2000's "Pollock," for example, the closest it came to explaining why heavily splattered canvases were a breakthrough in modern art was when the painter's wife cryptically proclaimed, "You've done it, Pollock! You've cracked it wide open!"

But in "Frida," a transporting cinematic experience about the life and work of Mexican surrealist Frida Kahlo, director Julie Taymor captures the very essence of Kahlo's creative process through a wondrously rich, freeform visual language that fuses the events of her life with the imagery in her paintings so vividly that the artist's work may take on a striking new significance for anyone who sees the film.

Passionately played by Salma Hayek, who has been personally shepherding this project for seven years, Kahlo comes to life in this picture as a complicated, dynamic, proud and intelligent woman whose frequent hardships informed her art. Opening when she was a plucky high school girl (36-year-old Hayek passes for 16 with remarkable ease), Frida is established as a young woman with a spicy individuality even before the 1925 bus wreck that irreversibly altered her life.

Continue reading: Frida Review

Edward Norton

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Edward Norton

Date of birth

18th August, 1969

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.83






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Edward Norton Movies

Isle Of Dogs Trailer

Isle Of Dogs Trailer

Imagine a world without dogs. It hardly bears thinking about, but in this dystopian look...

Collateral Beauty Movie Review

Collateral Beauty Movie Review

Dramas exploring the nature of death and the true meaning of life are always in...

Collateral Beauty Trailer

Collateral Beauty Trailer

Love, time and death connect every single human being on earth, we long for love,...

Sausage Party - Teaser Trailer

Sausage Party - Teaser Trailer

Frank is a hot dog Wiener who's packed into a vacuum seal bag with all...

Birdman Movie Review

Birdman Movie Review

Mexican filmmaker Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu continues to reject traditional narrative structures with this whizzy, ambitious...

The Grand Budapest Hotel - Featurettes Trailer

The Grand Budapest Hotel - Featurettes Trailer

While preparing to film 'The Grand Budapest Hotel', director Wes Anderson and company scouted for...

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Birdman - Exclusive Featurette Trailer

Birdman - Exclusive Featurette Trailer

The cast and crew of 'Birdman' discuss the visionary filming techniques behind the movie in...

Birdman Trailer

Birdman Trailer

Riggan Thomas (Michael Keeton) is faced with a serious problem. In an attempt to make...

Birdman Trailer

Birdman Trailer

20 years ago, Riggan Thomas (Michael Keaton) played the iconic Birdman - a comic book...

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