Eddie Albert

Eddie Albert

Eddie Albert Quick Links

Film RSS

The Teahouse Of The August Moon Review


Good
When Marlon Brando is first encountered in The Teahouse of the August Moon, Daniel Mann's 1956 film version on John Patrick's Pulitzer Prize winning comedy of 1953, you want to fight back. Here is Brando in comic Asian stereotype mode, playing Okinawan interpreter Sakini -- Brando hunched over obsequiously, his eyes jury-rigged Oriental style and speaking in an Okinawan accent, and you think, "Brando, you should be ashamed of yourself." But then movie memory kicks in and you recall nasty and virulent racial debauches like Mickey Rooney's Mr. Yunioshi in Breakfast at Tiffany's and Brando's downplaying doesn't look so bad after all. Although watching a tall American white guy play a short translator from Okinawa is still discomforting, at least you don't feel compelled to rise up and heave your boots through the TV.

Sakini is the audience's guide and master of ceremonies (he beckons the audience into the film by way of a direct address to the camera) in this sharp and funny comedy about American imperialism after the end of World War II. Sakini is the interpreter for the pompous American commander Colonel Purdy (played by Paul Ford, recreating his Broadway performance, a role he would later hone to perfection as the iconic Colonel Hall in Sgt. Bilko), a windbag idiot who makes declarations like, "I'm going to teach these natives the meaning of democracy if I have to shoot every one of them" (Donald Rumsfeld couldn't have said it better). Purdy orders the bumbling Captain Fisby (Glenn Ford, in a fine comic turn, channeling Charlie Ruggles) to lord it over a small Okinawan village and give the villagers a taste of benevolent American democratic dictatorship by making the villagers build a school and organize a "Ladies League For Democratic Action." Sakini goes along with him.

Continue reading: The Teahouse Of The August Moon Review

Roman Holiday Review


Extraordinary
One can't help but wonder how Roman Holiday would have been different is it was made today instead of in 1953 (Mr. Deeds aped Holiday more closely than its ostensible source material). The Gregory Peck-Audrey Hepburn classic features a reporter in Rome (Peck) and an incognito princess (Hepburn) -- with both pretending they're someone else. Of course, he knows she's playing hooky from her royal family and he's out to write the story of a lifetime (with photographer pal Eddie Albert in a priceless role). She on the other hand is oblivious to what's going on. She wants to have a little fun outside the watchful eyes of her keepers. Of course they fall in love along the way.

Roman Holiday is one of the most beloved of both Hepburn's and Peck's films, a lovely little romance, full of fun and playfulness, stellar performances (Hepburn won an Oscar and Albert was nominated), and all set against the beauty of Rome. Many of its scenes are nothing short of priceless: the ad-libbed moment when Peck sticks his hand into the mouth of a statue and pretends it's been bitten off (sending Hepburn into hysterics) is absolutely unforgettable.

Continue reading: Roman Holiday Review

Eddie Albert

Eddie Albert Quick Links

Film RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Actor


Suggested

Paloma Faith - Better Than This Video

Paloma Faith - Better Than This Video

With her fifth studio album 'Infinite Things' set to be released later this year, Paloma Faith unveils a music video for her newest song 'Better Than...

Album of the Week: Blur's The Great Escape turns 25

Album of the Week: Blur's The Great Escape turns 25

'The Great Escape' was released on this day (September 11th) in 1995.

Stormzy - Superheroes Video

Stormzy - Superheroes Video

With his forthcoming album 'Heavy is the Head' set for release this December, Stormzy has dropped an animated video for a new single entitled...

Eddie Albert Movies

Roman Holiday Movie Review

Roman Holiday Movie Review

One can't help but wonder how Roman Holiday would have been different is it was...

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews