Cathy Schulman

Cathy Schulman

Cathy Schulman Quick Links

Pictures Film RSS

Hylda Queally, Cathy Schulman , Cate Blanchett - Women In Film Los Angeles Celebrates The 2016 Crystal + Lucy Awards Presented by Max Mara and BMW at The Beverly Hilton - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Wednesday 15th June 2016

Hylda Queally, Cathy Schulman and Cate Blanchett

Lisa Nishimura, Laison Goss, Cindy Holland, Jane Wiseman, Cathy Schulman, Jane Fonda, Laura Prepon, Krysten Ritter, Chelsea Handler, Dominique Crenn, Jenji Kohan, Carol Kane, Moira Demos, Laura Ricciardi, Gabrielle Carteris, Abby Fuller , Lena Waithe - Netflix's Rebels and Rule Breakers Luncheon and Panel Celebrating The Women of Netflix at Beverly Wilshire Hotel - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Saturday 14th May 2016

Lisa Nishimura, Laison Goss, Cindy Holland, Jane Wiseman, Cathy Schulman, Jane Fonda, Laura Prepon, Krysten Ritter, Chelsea Handler, Dominique Crenn, Jenji Kohan, Carol Kane, Moira Demos, Laura Ricciardi, Gabrielle Carteris, Abby Fuller and Lena Waithe

Horns Review


Good

With his most stylish film yet, horror specialist Alexandre Aja takes a wildly irreverent approach, packing the screen with rude humour, visual flourishes and spiky characters. But it's assembled in such a rapid-fire way that it's difficult to get a handle on anything, which makes the movie feel like a series of outrageous set-pieces without a coherent plot to hold them together. The likeable actors help bring their characters to life, but the film is too hyperactive to let us engage with any of them.

It's set in a small town near Seattle, where Ig (Daniel Radcliffe) is in shock after his childhood sweetheart Merrin (Juno Temple) was violently murdered. Then he becomes the prime suspect, and the media have a field day. So he hires his lifelong pal Lee (Max Minghella) as his lawyer, partly because he's the only person in town who believes he's innocent. This includes Ig's parents (James Remar and Kathleen Quinlan) and brother (Joe Anderson). As the situation continues to deteriorate, Ig suddenly discovers that horns are growing on his head and no one seems very shocked by this. They also seem unable to lie in his presence, so he decides to use this to find out who really killed Merrin. Along the way he gets a shocking glimpse into what everyone in town really thinks about each other.

The film is an assault on the senses, as Aja packs every moment with outrageous sights and sounds, encouraging the actors to sometimes drift over the line into broad slapstick. He also fills the screen with religious imagery, including churches, crosses, pitchforks and snakes, all hinting that Ig's transformation is connected with his loss of faith. Or maybe it's just part of the film's jokey attitude. But as pieces of the central mystery slowly fall into place, the movie seems to become looser and less coherent. Even when the real villain is identified, there's still at least half an hour of flashbacks and revelations, confrontations and conclusions, none of which are particularly surprising or satisfying.

Continue reading: Horns Review

Employee Of The Month (2004) Review


Good
Matt Dillon must have really loved Wild Things. A lot.. Here he appears with Christina Applegate in another circuitous drama/thriller involving lots of cash, this time about a poor guy who loses his job and his girl on the same day. Shortly thereafter, the bank where he worked is robbed. Think he might be in on it? Rest assured, there are about 15 more twists in store for you before the movie's all said and done. Employee of the Month has moments a-plenty both cute and clever, but it doesn't quite generate enough interest to make you really vest yourself in the plot.

Crash (2004) Review


Excellent
In Crash, a simple car accident forms an unyielding foundation for the complex exploration of race and prejudice. Thoroughly repulsive throughout, but incredibly thought provoking long after, Paul Haggis' breathtaking directorial debut succeeds in bringing to the forefront the behaviors that many people keep under their skin. And by thrusting these attitudes toward us with a highly calculated, reckless abandon, Haggis puts racism on the highest pedestal for our review.

There is no better place for this examination than the culturally diverse melting pot of modern-day Los Angeles. In just over 24 hours, Crash brings together people from all walks of life. Two philosophizing black men (Ludacris and Larenz Tate) steal the expensive SUV belonging to the white, L.A. District Attorney (Brendan Fraser), and his high-strung wife (Sandra Bullock). A similar vehicle belonging to a wealthy black television director (Terrence Howard) and his wife (Thandie Newton) is later pulled over by a racist cop (Matt Dillon) and his partner (Ryan Phillippe). Soon, many of these people get mixed up with a Latino locksmith (Michael Peña), a Persian storekeeper (Shaun Toub), and two ethnically diverse, dating police detectives (Don Cheadle and Jennifer Esposito).

Continue reading: Crash (2004) Review

Godsend Review


Weak
Watching Godsend compares to eating a gallon of fudge-filled chocolate ice cream minutes before going to bed. You know it's bad for you, but the experience is tons of fun. Soon enough, though, the gooey dessert stops tasting so good. By the time you near the bottom of the container, you can't even justify why you continue to swallow spoonfuls, but you keep eating despite the fact that it doesn't make sense to continue.

That also explains director Nick Hamm's jackhammer approach to his material. He knows he's working with a cheesy campfire story, the kind best whispered to terrified boy scouts in the dead of night. But he's sadly unaware of when enough is enough, and his final act becomes a series of ludicrous scientific explanations offset by cheap jolts to our nervous system.

Continue reading: Godsend Review

Cathy Schulman

Cathy Schulman Quick Links

Pictures Film RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Filmmaker


Suggested

World UFO Day: The alien soundtrack to your life

World UFO Day: The alien soundtrack to your life

When music and the cosmos collide.

Which music streaming service should you subscribe to?

Which music streaming service should you subscribe to?

We help you decide who to give your money to.

The simple guide to buying the right headphones

The simple guide to buying the right headphones

What do you need to know about buying headphones?

Advertisement
Music to inspire you to experience nature [Playlist]

Music to inspire you to experience nature [Playlist]

Nature-inspired songs we just can't get enough of.

Six unexpected things musicians are doing to help while quarantined

Six unexpected things musicians are doing to help while quarantined

Artists are coming up with different ways to entertain and help out this year.

How the Mifo O5 PRO earbuds made us cordless converts [REVIEW]

How the Mifo O5 PRO earbuds made us cordless converts [REVIEW]

The Mifo O5 PROs are some of the most durable wireless earbuds on the market and we can't recommend them enough.

Stay In and Rock Out: A playlist to get you through quarantine

Stay In and Rock Out: A playlist to get you through quarantine

These songs were written for times like these.

Advertisement

Cathy Schulman Movies

Horns Movie Review

Horns Movie Review

With his most stylish film yet, horror specialist Alexandre Aja takes a wildly irreverent approach,...

Advertisement
Crash (2004) Movie Review

Crash (2004) Movie Review

In Crash, a simple car accident forms an unyielding foundation for the complex exploration of...

Godsend Movie Review

Godsend Movie Review

Watching Godsend compares to eating a gallon of fudge-filled chocolate ice cream minutes before going...

Advertisement
Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews