Bill Sage

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We Are What We Are Trailer


Frank Parker is a formidable and highly religious man who takes his family traditions very seriously. He, his wife and two daughters Rose and Iris live comfortably in a small shack in a remote part of the Delaware County, but their security is threatened when a disastrous storm strikes and the river begins to flood. Mrs Parker suffers from a rare neurological disease and soon passes away leaving her family devastated. They vow to carry on the family customs, however, as Frank lands Iris with a huge responsibility. They are ritualistic cannibals, and she must be the one to bring in the food this time. However, when bones wash up on a nearby river bank after the floods, the authorities are drawn near and suspicion starts to arise surrounding the mysterious family.

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We Are What We Are Review


Very Good

Even though this is an extremely well-made film, it's difficult to know who will enjoy it, as it's far too arty for horror genre fans and much too grisly for arthouse moviegoers. But those who like something a bit different will enjoy it, especially since this remake takes a very different approach to the original 2010 Mexican film. Both films are about families who indulge in cannibalism as a long-standing tradition, but the similarities end there.

This version is set in small-town America, where an unusual number of young women have gone missing over the years, and a recent flood has unearthed human remains downriver from the Parker family farm. Frank Parker (Sage) is in mourning after his wife dies in the storm, and responsibility for the family's Lambs Day feast now falls to eldest daughter Iris (Childers), assisted by younger siblings Rose and Rory (Garner and Gore). But Iris is reluctant to carry out the gruesome tradition, and would rather hang out with cute young Deputy Anders (Russell). Meanwhile, Frank is increasingly worried about nosey neighbour Marge (McGillis) and the investigations of the local doctor (Parks) and sheriff (Damici).

"This is what we do," the Parkers remind themselves as they prepare their dinner of human stew. And screenwriters Mickle and Damici really dig into the family's past, which stretches to events nearly 240 years earlier, stirring American history into the intriguing cultural subtext. Mickle also remembers to freak us out with hints and suggestions in every scene, from ominous noises in the Parker's shed to a secret journal that outlines the family's traditions. The actors play their roles just below the surface, with muted emotions and subtle glances that tell us more than dialogue ever could.

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Electrick Children Review


Good
Slow and introspective, this involving drama wobbles slightly as its plot takes a few contrived turns. But the performances are excellent, and the filmmaking is mesmerising. And it's exploring some themes that are rarely addressed so boldly on-screen.

Raised in an cloistered religious community in Utah, Rachel (Garner) has just turned 15 and believes that she's pregnant because she listened to some illicit pop music. Her parents (Watros and Zane) think otherwise, blaming her brother Will (Aiken) for this "immaculate" conception. But instead of face an arranged marriage to a stranger, Rachel runs off with Will to Las Vegas. There they meet Clyde (Culkin), a young rocker who challenges everything they've been taught and changes the way they see the world.

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Rock The Boat Review


Weak
Rather vapid corporate mystery has Amanda Donohoe investigating a little corruption, a little murder as she retakes control of the company she founded. Too bad none of the stories is very interesting.
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Bill Sage Movies

We Are What We Are  Trailer

We Are What We Are Trailer

Frank Parker is a formidable and highly religious man who takes his family traditions very...

We Are What We Are Movie Review

We Are What We Are Movie Review

Even though this is an extremely well-made film, it's difficult to know who will enjoy...

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Electrick Children Movie Review

Electrick Children Movie Review

Slow and introspective, this involving drama wobbles slightly as its plot takes a few contrived...

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