Zoe Wanamaker

Zoe Wanamaker

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Zoe Wanamaker attending the 2016 London Evening Standard Theatre Awards held at the Old Vic Theatre - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 13th November 2016

Zoe Wanamaker
Zoe Wanamaker

Zoe Wanamaker - The Evening Standard Theatre Awards held at the Old Vic - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 22nd November 2015

Zoe Wanamaker
Zoe Wanamaker and Gawn Grainger
Lenny Henry, Zoe Wanamaker and Gawn Grainger
Lenny Henry and Zoe Wanamaker
Zoe Wanamaker

Zoe Wanamaker - Cheltenham Literature Festival - Day 10 at Cheltenham Literature Festival - Cheltenham, United Kingdom - Sunday 11th October 2015

Zoe Wanamaker
Zoe Wanamaker
Zoe Wanamaker
Zoe Wanamaker
Zoe Wanamaker
Zoe Wanamaker

Zoe Wanamaker - Matthew Bourne's 'The Car Man' Gala Night at Sadlers Wells, London at Sadlers Wells - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 19th July 2015

Zoe Wanamaker
Zoe Wanamaker and Gawn Grainger

Zoe Wanamaker and Walter Bobbie - A variety of stars were snapped as they arrived for the opening night of Broadway's new msuical, comedy show 'Something Rotten' which was held at the St. James Theatre in New York City, New York, United States - Wednesday 22nd April 2015

Zoe Wanamaker and Walter Bobbie
Zoe Wanamaker

Passion Play Trailer


James and Eleanor are a seemingly happy couple who have been married 25 glorious years. However, the arrival of a stunning young woman named Kate who befriends the couple becomes their downfall as James embarks on a sordid affair with her whilst frantically trying to cover his tracks from his wife. Soon the mountain of lies grows and it becomes inevitable that the truth will be revealed with inner passions and emotions betraying the perpetrators and barely shrouding their secret. Meanwhile, James and Eleanor's identical inner voices make themselves known to the audience as we experience their raw emotions first hand.

Continue: Passion Play Trailer

My Week With Marilyn Review


Very Good
Based on Colin Clark's memoirs, this film sometimes feels a bit too warm and nostalgic for its own good. But the performances are strong, and it's packed with terrific moments.

At age 23, Colin (Redmayne) is struggling to break into the movie business, camping out at the production offices of Laurence Olivier (Branagh), who is just about to start filming the 1957 comedy The Prince and the Showgirl with Marilyn Monroe (Williams). While Marilyn's diva behaviour and strict acting coach (Wanamaker) enrage Laurence, he can't deny that when she gets it right, she's magic. Meanwhile, Colin is assigned to help Marilyn make it through the shoot. And of course he can't help falling for her.

Continue reading: My Week With Marilyn Review

My Week With Marilyn Trailer


Colin Clark is an aspiring film maker and his first job upon leaving university is the role of assistant on a new film, called The Prince and The Showgirl. It stars a young Laurence Olivier and Marilyn Monroe, the blonde bombshell who shocks with her implications that she sleeps in the nude.

Continue: My Week With Marilyn Trailer

It's A Wonderful Afterlife Review


OK
Filmmaker Chadha is back with another uneven comedy, although unlike Bride & Prejudice, this isn't actually a Bollywood variation on the Frank Capra classic: it's a London farce about arranged marriage with a ghostly twist.

The widowed Mrs Sethi (Azmi) is worried that her slightly overweight daughter Roopi (Notay) will never find a husband. Every match she arranges turns Roopi down, which leads Mrs Sethi to react murderously. But now the ghosts (Khan, Bkaskar, Ross and Varrez) of her victims are offering to help in order to improve their chances of reincarnation. Fortunately, Roopi's childhood friend Murthy (Ramamurthy) is back in town and hugely eligible. Unfortunately, he's a detective looking for the killer.

Continue reading: It's A Wonderful Afterlife Review

Wilde Review


Weak
You would think the life of Oscar Wilde would lend itself more to film. Not so. This biopic is unfathomably boring and ultimately pointless.

Harry Potter And The Sorcerer's Stone Review


Very Good

When you're the chosen one, like the boy wizard Harry Potter, expectations surrounding your arrival can be quite high. The same can be said for the film adaptation about said boy wizard, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone. And while the young wonder might not let his magic school chums down, the movie chronicling his early wizard years could use a little lift.

Which isn't to say that Sorcerer's Stone, the first Harry Potter movie based on J.K. Rowling's inexplicably successful book series, is a boring movie. In fact, Rowling's exceptional world, involving young magic makers at a British wizardry prep school, transfers to the screen with a general creativity and charm in the hands of director Chris Columbus. The author's Cinderella-esque tale of a boy who gets invited to the most magical ball of them all, kicks off with a classic sensibility, almost like a modern Dickens.

From there, getting to the celebrated Hogwarts School is a treat, as Harry (Daniel Radcliffe) and the rest of the incoming first-years (including Rupert Grint as Ron Weasley and Emma Watson as Hermione Granger) buy the proper wizard tools, find the elusive Track 9 3/4 at the train station, and travel in boats by moonlight to the gothic center of higher learning. Columbus weaves the special effects so smoothly into the narrative as to make the magic nearly matter-of-fact.

But after we get the general gist of life at Hogwarts, Sorcerer's Stone loses some of its sheen. The collection of characters to which we're introduced early -- Maggie Smith as Professor McGonagall; Alan Rickman as the eerie Professor Snape; the delightful Robbie Coltrane as Rubeus Hagrid -- aren't utilized well enough to provide the necessary oomph. They're stuck within Steve Kloves' (Wonder Boys) light, thin plot, with their roles eventually reduced to side characters, comic relief, or vague red herrings.

And the flatness of the narrative goes hand-in-hand with some of Sorcerer's Stone look as well. Save for a couple of sequences, Columbus just doesn't provide enough visual wow for such magical subject matter. I know that some of the action is meant to be dark, but the overall look of the movie doesn't have the punch that the on-screen activity demands. In the end, there are too many missed opportunities for maximum thrills.

A prime exception is the truly wonderful centerpiece of the film, a prep school Quidditch match. For the uninitiated, Quidditch is a soccer style game played completely in mid-air, with players on broomsticks. Picture a combination of The Wizard of Oz and Rollerball.

Columbus' take on this game is superb. There's speedy action, seamless effects, and some thrilling excitement. The design of the match provides a wonderful combination of visual styles, with mid-20th century prep school clothes amidst medieval set design. The scene is, by far, the highlight of the film, much as the pod race was in Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (oddly enough, another somewhat disappointing movie about a chosen boy).

But once we get back to the tale of our trio of little wizards, the plodding plot returns. And unfortunately, Radcliffe, as our hero, doesn't seem too enthused by much of the wild goings-on. His school cronies, on the other hand, are just great -- Grint, as Ronald, is wide-eyed and sympathetic, and Watson, as the precocious Hermione, is smart and energetic, taking a bigger bite out of this movie than any other actor.

While Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone does score points by giving visuals to some wildly fantastic stuff, the total picture lacks polish, and feels like a mild setup to future movies. Similar to X-Men, we get an environment being introduced just for the sake of future movies. That creates anticipation among fans, but shortchanges those watching this one.

The release of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone coincides with another Harry Potter milestone -- the beginning of production on Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, scheduled to hit theaters in mid-November, 2002. Stone is already expected to break box office records, including a possible run at Titanic (highly unlikely, if you ask me). That means there's one thing Warner Brothers will be saying about young Harry for the foreseeable future... long live The Boy Who Lived.

Harry Potter's DVD is as inexplicable as it is ambitious. An enormous two-disc set, the DVD promises tantalizing "never before seen footage," but good luck trying to find it. Disc one is the standard movie, and disc two amounts to what is best described as an intricate game for kids. It's all designed as a puzzle -- to do anything you have to twist the right bricks to gain access, just like Harry and Hagrid did in London. If you didn't memorize the pattern, you'll have to go back to the movie (swapping discs in the process -- though if you screw up enough times, the game will eventually show you the answer). To open more and more of the disc you have to complete more and more idiotic tasks -- picking a wand, mixing potions, and the like. I gave up after half an hour of this nonsense, having exposed little more than a collection of interview clips. Warner Brothers: I appreciate that you've tried to do something beyond the usual with this highly anticipated release, but for us adults, give us a back door to the special features. We just don't have time for this Hogwarts -- I mean, hogwash.

School's in session.

Zoe Wanamaker

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Zoe Wanamaker Movies

Passion Play Trailer

Passion Play Trailer

James and Eleanor are a seemingly happy couple who have been married 25 glorious years....

My Week With Marilyn Movie Review

My Week With Marilyn Movie Review

Based on Colin Clark's memoirs, this film sometimes feels a bit too warm and nostalgic...

My Week With Marilyn Trailer

My Week With Marilyn Trailer

Colin Clark is an aspiring film maker and his first job upon leaving university is...

It's a Wonderful Afterlife Movie Review

It's a Wonderful Afterlife Movie Review

Filmmaker Chadha is back with another uneven comedy, although unlike Bride & Prejudice, this isn't...

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone Movie Review

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone Movie Review

When you're the chosen one, like the boy wizard Harry Potter, expectations surrounding your arrival...

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