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Actress Zhang Ziyi Gives Birth To A Baby Girl


Ziyi Zhang

Chinese actress Zhang Ziyi, famous for her roles in hit martial arts movies such as The Grandmaster and House of Flying Daggers, has given birth to her first child over the weekend.

The 36 year old star announced on Monday (December 28th) that she welcomed a baby girl the day before, her first with her rock star husband Wang Feng. She posted a sweet picture commemorating the birth via her profile on the Chinese social media site Weibo, of her and her husband holding their baby’s tiny fingers.

Zhang ZiyiZhang Ziyi has given birth to her first child with rock star husband Wang Feng

Continue reading: Actress Zhang Ziyi Gives Birth To A Baby Girl

The Grandmaster Review


Very Good

Leave it to Hong Kong maestro Wong Kar Wai (In the Mood for Love) to reinvent both the historical biopic and Chinese kung fu action movie in one fell swoop. This is a staggeringly beautiful movie, designed and shot with precision and sensitivity to show both the action and the drama in telling detail. The story of one of the most iconic martial artists in Chinese history, the film is lush and involving even as it's also somewhat overly complicated and hard to engage with.

It starts in 1936, when northern master Gong (Wang Qingxiang) travels to the south to investigate reports about Ip Man (Tony Leung Chiu Wai), who just might be the future of kung fu. Intrigued, he offers Ip the chance to become the grandmaster. But Gong's daughter Er (Zhang Ziyi) feels like this is an insult to her family. Then in 1938 Japan invades, and Ip refuses to collaborate with the enemy, which separates him from his wife (Song Hye-kyo) and children. Although Gong's heir Ma San (Zhang Jin) does make a deal with the Japanese, which strongly offends Er's intensely held code of honour. More than a decade later Ip tracks down Er again in Hong Kong; she's working as a doctor while Ip is teaching martial arts. His newest student is the young Bruce Lee.

This story is told through a series of epic hand-to-hand battles, each of which is choreographed in a specific style suitable to the combatants. These details may not be clear to unschooled audience members, but the way Wong shoots and edits the scenes is seriously striking. With lush photography by Oscar-nominated Philippe Le Sourd, the fight scenes have astounding detail, often slow-motion close-ups that make each encounter refreshingly lucid. They're also never overwrought, designed to show the skill of the fighters rather than the usual blood and death. And while Leung gives the film a strikingly cool centre, it's Zhang Ziyi who breathes real passion into the story, lighting up the screen even when she's standing silent and still

Continue reading: The Grandmaster Review

Zhang Ziyi - 67th Cannes Film Festival - Grace of Monaco - Premiere - Cannes, Cote d'Azur, France - Wednesday 14th May 2014

Zhang Ziyi
Zhang Ziyi

Zhang Ziyi - The 67th Annual Cannes Film Festival - Opening Ceremony & 'Grace Of Monaco' Premiere - Cannes, France - Wednesday 14th May 2014

Zhang Ziyi
Zhang Ziyi
Zhang Ziyi
Zhang Ziyi

'The Grandmaster' Wins Just About Everything At Hong Kong Film Awards


Ziyi Zhang Wong Kar-Wai

Wong Kar-Wai's The Grandmaster has won 12 prizes at the Hong Kong Film Awards, including Best Film. Wong was also named Best Director while Zhang Ziyi (Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon) and Zhang Jin won Best Actress and Best Supporting Actor respectively.

Wong Kar WaiWong Kar-Wai's 'The Grandmaster' Cleaned Up At The Hong Kong Film Awards

"I remember it was 1994 when I was last here," said Kar-Wai upon accpteing his prize, "It was a short walk from the podium to the stage, but it took me 20 years to come back to this spot."

Continue reading: 'The Grandmaster' Wins Just About Everything At Hong Kong Film Awards

Ziyi Zhang and Maria Menounos - Celebrities at The Grove to appear on entertainment news show 'Extra' - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 22nd August 2013

Ziyi Zhang and Maria Menounos
Ziyi Zhang
Ziyi Zhang
Ziyi Zhang
Ziyi Zhang
Ziyi Zhang

Ziyi Zhang - "The Grandmaster" - Los Angeles Premiere - Hollywood, California, United States - Friday 23rd August 2013

Ziyi Zhang
Ziyi Zhang
Ziyi Zhang
Ziyi Zhang
Ziyi Zhang
Ziyi Zhang

Ziyi Zhang - Los Angeles Screening of THE GRANDMASTER - Hollywood, CA, United States - Thursday 22nd August 2013

Ziyi Zhang
Ziyi Zhang
Ziyi Zhang
Ziyi Zhang
Ziyi Zhang
Ziyi Zhang

'The Grandmaster' Re-Tells The Story Of China's Greatest Martial Artist [Trailer]


Ziyi Zhang Tony Leung Chiu-Wai Cung Le

Here's a martial arts film to get excited about, the semi-autobiographical tale of one of China's most famed martial artists in the past hundred years; the legendary Ip Man. The Grandmaster re-tells the story of the legendary South Chinese fighter and his feud with Northern China's fightest fist fighter, Gong Yutian, his decline into poverty following the Second Sino-Japanese War and his eventual rise once again to the top as a fighter in Honk Kong, where he eventually met and trained Bruce Lee.

Watch the trailer for The Grandmaster

In the film, we see Yutian renounce his title as grandmaster in order to challenges Ip (who was picked as South China's representative fighter) to a fight to see who really is the greatest martial artist of their time.

Continue reading: 'The Grandmaster' Re-Tells The Story Of China's Greatest Martial Artist [Trailer]

The Grandmaster Trailer


Ip Man was a martial arts legend famous for tutoring the actor and Jeet Kune Do founder Bruce Lee. This movie tells the story of how Northern China's best martial artist Gong Yutian renounces his grandmaster title and challenges Ip (who was picked as the representative of Southern China) to a fight. However, following his dignified win, Gong's daughter Gong Err seeks to restore her family's honour with another challenge. Later, though, their lives are interrupted by the Second Sino-Japanese War and Ip's family is thrust into poverty while Gong Err is forced on a mission of vengeance when her father is brutally killed. Both must choose a new path for themselves to follow - though Ip struggles to make much of a life for himself; standing out against the other fighting talent of Hong Kong proves to be difficult and he must use all his ability to become a great Grandmaster.

Continue: The Grandmaster Trailer

Rush Hour 2 Review


Good
I enjoyed the original Rush Hour, the 1998 action comedy that grossed more than $250 million worldwide. Through its central characters, played by Chris Tucker and Jackie Chan, the film provided audiences with a fresh, exciting combination of action and outrageous comedy. Although not a great film, and certainly not worthy of a sequel, director Brett Ratner admirably stitched together two immensely different characters, finding a charismatic delight in the diversity of Tucker and Chan.

Unfortunately Ratner does not find the same joy in Rush Hour 2, an occasionally amusing comedic adventure that leaves us with a profoundly annoying Chris Tucker fighting for attention while Jackie Chan fights one-dimensional Chinese villains with his bare fists. The film contains some neat action sequences, a great third act, and the most hilarious outtakes I can remember - but the clash of genres feels intrusive and awkward. I wanted more excitement, more character dimension, and a whole hell of a lot less of Chris Tucker's irritating mouth.

Continue reading: Rush Hour 2 Review

Hero (2002) Review


Excellent
After political (Raise the Red Lantern), sexy (Ju Dou) and reflective (The Road Home) films, writer-director Zhang Yimou embraces the aerodynamic action of digitally enhanced kung fu swordplay made famous in Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. The object here is to outdazzle that genre landmark and, perhaps, to outdo it at the box office.

It's probably too late and too familiar a technique to do either, but there's plenty to admire despite those limitations, for which it has already received critical and award level acclaim. At the time of this writing, it is one of the 2002 Oscar nominees for Best Foreign Language Film.

Continue reading: Hero (2002) Review

2046 Review


Extraordinary
Picking up where In the Mood for Love dropped off, but also mixing in elements of (or at least nods to) just about all of his other films, Wong Kar Wai's 2046 has most of the same positives, as well as the negatives, common to his work, meaning it's frustrating, elliptical, occasionally quite shallow, and utterly smashing to behold in all its nervy glory.

This time, Tony Leung's Chow Mo-Wan is far from the repressed creature that he played in Love, eternally suffering for the married beauty living in his apartment building. Mo-Wan is now going through all the highs and lows of numerous affairs in 1960s Hong Kong, playing out almost an entire history of love within the space of one film. The title comes from the number of the apartment next to his, wherein reside a number of women with whom we will see him become entangled over the course of the film. 2046 is also the name of a science fiction serial he scribbles down (part of the dues he pays as a struggling hack writer), scenes of which we see acted out, watching its hero endure an eternal train ride away from the mysterious place called 2046, where everybody goes to reclaim lost memories and never returns from; except him.

Continue reading: 2046 Review

House Of Flying Daggers Review


Terrible

How the same talented director (Zhang Yimou of "The Road Home" and "Raise the Red Lantern"), working with the same talented actress (lovely Zhang Ziyi of "The Road Home" and "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon") could turn out one of the year's best movies and one its worst -- in the same genre no less -- is a complete mystery. But that's exactly what has happened with a pair of handsomely grandiose martial arts films set in ancient China.

Last summer's "Hero," starring Jet Li as an assassin locked in unblinking intellectual combat with the king he's come to kill, is an imaginatively allegorical, action-packed but understated, brilliant historical epic (in which Zhang Ziyi plays another assassin's apprentice). Pure in vision and bold in execution, it uses real events as a momentous backdrop for jaw-dropping scenes of graceful, physics-defying swordfights, each of which has an increasingly profound consequence on the future of the whole Chinese nation.

But "House of Flying Daggers" is the polar opposite: an outsized and endlessly pretentious romantic melodrama, also about assassins, in which the director has clearly lost any sense of moderation or self-discipline. Every overly polished moment of visual refinement is dragged out to the point of absurdity. Every hint of emotion becomes an excuse for floodgate histrionics. Each swordfight (or combat of any kind) slowly, slowly, s-l-o-w-l-y builds past an initial stage of breathtaking stylishness into a protracted mockery of itself. It's the snooty, art-house equivalent of a Jerry Bruckheimer action movie.

Continue reading: House Of Flying Daggers Review

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon Review


Very Good

A magnificently crafted hybrid of Chinese historical epic, F/X-enhanced martial arts spectacular, mystical romantic tragedy and live-action anime, "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon" is a film that defies genre while embracing traditionalism.

It's an intellectually challenging story of noble warriors in feudal China, yet it's packed with eloquent swordplay and lightning-fast hand-to-hand combat. It's also the story of a burning, long-unspoken love between one warrior and the fiancée of a fallen comrade -- a woman his honor forbids him from pursuing, even years later as they fight side-by-side against a mysterious and vengeful sworn enemy.

What's more, it is an unconventional coming-of-age fable as well, about the beautiful teenage daughter (Zhang Ziyi) of a provincial governor, who longs desperately for freedom in the face of an impending arranged marriage that will surely clip her wings.

Continue reading: Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon Review

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Ziyi Zhang Movies

The Grandmaster Movie Review

The Grandmaster Movie Review

Leave it to Hong Kong maestro Wong Kar Wai (In the Mood for Love) to...

The Grandmaster Trailer

The Grandmaster Trailer

Ip Man is a legend in the field of martial arts, best known for teaching...

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The Grandmaster Trailer

The Grandmaster Trailer

Ip Man was a martial arts legend famous for tutoring the actor and Jeet Kune...

TMNT Movie Review

TMNT Movie Review

On Sunday night, a friend of mine recanted his experience of seeing TMNT, the digitally-animated...

Memoirs of a Geisha Movie Review

Memoirs of a Geisha Movie Review

The only thing which director Rob Marshall doesn't throw into Memoirs of a Geisha is...

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Rush Hour 2 Movie Review

Rush Hour 2 Movie Review

I enjoyed the original Rush Hour, the 1998 action comedy that grossed more than $250...

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon Movie Review

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon Movie Review

If you thought the only real place for gravity-defying fight scenes was The Matrix, think...

The House of Flying Daggers Movie Review

The House of Flying Daggers Movie Review

A poet of the small gesture, Zhang Yimou moves on from his slice-of-life dramas Not...

Hero (2002) Movie Review

Hero (2002) Movie Review

After political (Raise the Red Lantern), sexy (Ju Dou) and reflective (The Road Home) films,...

2046 Movie Review

2046 Movie Review

Picking up where In the Mood for Love dropped off, but also mixing in elements...

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