Zachary Knighton

Zachary Knighton

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American Idol XlV Finalists Party

Zachary Knighton - A host of stars were photographed as they attended the American Idol XlV Finalists Party which was held at The District in Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 12th March 2015

(L-R) Actors Becki Newton, Nate Torrence, Meera Rohit Kumbhani and Zachary Knighton
(L-R) Actors Becki Newton, Nate Torrence, Meera Rohit Kumbhani and Zachary Knighton
Zachary Knighton
(L-R) Actors Becki Newton, Nate Torrence, Meera Rohit Kumbhani and Zachary Knighton
(L-R) Actors Becki Newton, Nate Torrence, Meera Rohit Kumbhani and Zachary Knighton

"American Idol XIV" Finalist Party

Zachary Knighton - "American Idol XIV" Finalist Party at The District Restaurant - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 11th March 2015

Becki Newton, Nate Torrence, Meera Rohit Kumbhan and Zachary Knighton
Zachary Knighton

American Idol Season 14 Finalists Party

Nate Torrence, Becki Newton, Meera Rohit Kumbhani and Zachary Knighton - American Idol Season 14 Finalists Party - Arrivals at The District - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 11th March 2015

Nate Torrence, Becki Newton, Meera Rohit Kumbhani and Zachary Knighton
Nate Torrence
Nate Torrence

2015 FOX Winter Television Critics Association All-Star Party

Becki Newton and Zachary Knighton - 2015 FOX Winter Television Critics Association All-Star Party at the Langham Huntington Hotel - Arrivals at Langham Huntington Hotel - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 17th January 2015

Becki Newton, Zachary Knighton, Nate Torrence and Meera Rohit Kumbhani
Becki Newton, Zachary Knighton, Nate Torrence and Meera Rohit Kumbhani
Becki Newton, Zachary Knighton, Nate Torrence and Meera Rohit Kumbhani
Becki Newton, Zachary Knighton, Nate Torrence and Meera Rohit Kumbhani
Becki Newton, Zachary Knighton, Nate Torrence and Meera Rohit Kumbhani

Believe Me Review


Excellent

A knowing, very sharp script gives this comedy a very strong kick as it tells a story about interlopers in America's Christian subculture. It would have been easy to either take cheap potshots or veer into inspirational sentimentality, but the filmmakers cleverly navigate a middle ground that refuses to simplify either the morality or the message. It's a lively, entertaining romp with real bite.

The film opens in Austin, Texas, where Sam (Alex Russell) is stunned to learn that he won't graduate and go to law school unless he pays $9,000 in overdue fees. Then he gets an idea from a Christian youth group raising funds for a mission trip to Hawaii: why not start a charity funding wells in Africa and keep some of the cash for himself? He enlists the help of his three best friends (Miles Fisher, Max Adler and Sinqua Walls), and before they know it they're headlining major events to adoring crowds across the country. This rock-star life is very lucrative too, especially as they continue to learn better ways to convince the crowd that they're true believers. But as the moral high ground becomes swamped by all that cash, they begin to have their doubts.

It's clear that writer-director Will Bakke and cowriter Michael B. Allen know only too well what they're talking about, as the film cuts a razor-like swathe right through church culture, from repetitive worship songs and cliche-ridden prayers to Christian-targeted movies. Even more pointed is the way the film deals with the vast amounts of money that have essentially turned the fundamentalist church in America into a mega-corporation that knows exactly how to deploy right-wing political sloganeering to get their followers on their feet cheering. These issues are actually integral to the story, as Sam and his friends discover the secrets to helping Christians feel better about themselves as they part with their cash.

Continue reading: Believe Me Review

2014 Television Critics Association Summer Press Tour

Zachary Knighton - 2014 Television Critics Association Summer Press Tour - FOX All-Star Party at Soho House in West Hollywood - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 21st July 2014

Zachary Knighton

The Hitcher Review


Weak
As the opening frames for The Hitcher inform us, 48,000 people die each year on the road each year. I know these sorrows have a variety of causes. Some are pure tragic accident, some the fault of inebriation, and some the fault of forgetting a turn signal or not watching a blind spot. Somehow, I doubt being sliced up by Brits in the middle of the New Mexico desert registers in the top five.

After attempting to briefly educate us about the perils of driving, The Hitcher (a remake of the 1986 cable standby) then jumps straight into the action. A guy (Zachary Knighton) waits impatiently for his girlfriend outside her dorm with a 1970 Oldsmobile 442. As he sits by his muscle car and she (Sophia Bush) comes out with nothing but pajamas and a small backpack on, The Hitcher feels like it should turn into a Penthouse story at any moment. They hop in the car, and before we even get their names we get to see Bush changing in the car and going on the road.

Continue reading: The Hitcher Review

The Mudge Boy Review


OK
Writer/director Michael Burke said he wanted to tell a story about growing up as a kid too sensitive for a harsh environment (rural Vermont). Now I've never thought of Vermont is "harsh," but God knows I hope Burke's life as a youth didn't include being raped by his friend in a barn and molesting a chicken. Pity Emile Hirsch's Duncan Mudge, who is trying to get his life back together after the death of his mother. Cold dad (Richard Jenkins) is no help, sending Duncan to look for companionship in the guise of the local hoods who ride around in a pickup. Sadly, despite a few graphic and disturbing events, nothing much happens to Duncan -- at least nothing which could be considered a "story." When the credits rolled, I was shocked by the state of disarray the plot had been left in. (Unsurprisingly, the script came out of a Sundance workshop.)

The Mudge Boy Review


OK
Writer/director Michael Burke said he wanted to tell a story about growing up as a kid too sensitive for a harsh environment (rural Vermont). Now I've never thought of Vermont is "harsh," but God knows I hope Burke's life as a youth didn't include being raped by his friend in a barn and molesting a chicken. Pity Emily Hirsch's Duncan Mudge, who is trying to get his life back together after the death of his mother. Cold dad (Richard Jenkins) is no help, sending Duncan to look for companionship in the guise of the local hoods who ride around in a pickup. Sadly, despite a few graphic and disturbing events, nothing much happens to Duncan -- at least nothing which could be considered a "story." When the credits rolled, I was shocked by the state of disarray the plot had been left in. (Unsurprisingly, the script came out of a Sundance workshop.)
Zachary Knighton

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