Yusuke Iseya

Yusuke Iseya

Yusuke Iseya Quick Links

Video Film RSS

Rurouni Kenshin 2 - Trailer


Kenshin Himura (Takeru Satoh) was once a legendary swordsman throughout the civil war that swept across Japan through the 19th Century. After making a name for himself as 'Battosai the Killer', Himura has settled down and taken on the life of a lone wanderer who serves whoever needs his help, although he never kills anymore. But when his successor, Makoto Shishio (Tatsuya Fujiwara), is found to have survived being burnt alive, he begins a bloodthirsty attack on the Japanese government. Himura is called back into service to save Japan, but he must ensure he never kills anyone ever again. But can he fulfil that promise?

Continue: Rurouni Kenshin 2 - Trailer

13 Assassins Review


Very Good
Carefully paced to draw out the internal warfare as much as the blood-and-guts variety, this samurai showdown packs a potent emotional wallop. If the first half feels a little dull, the hour-long battle scene makes up for that.

In 1844 Japan, young Lord Naritsugu (Inagaki) is such a sadist that he's about to end a long period of peace. And his merciless rampage of rape, torture and death goes unchallenged because he's the Shogun's half-brother. Shocked by where this is heading, top samurai Shinzaemon (Yakusho) assembles a team of 12 warriors to take him out. It's clearly a suicide mission. And they pick up a wild-eyed 13th colleague (Iseya) on the way to setting an elaborate trap for Naritsugu and his 200-strong entourage.

Continue reading: 13 Assassins Review

Blindness Review


Bad
Fernando Meirelles' Blindness was adapted from the novel written by Portuguese Nobel-laureate Jose Saramago. The novel follows a singular woman who somehow goes uninfected when a sudden, freakish plague of "white blindness" strikes the planet, leaving her the sole witness to moral and sanitary decay and atrocities unmentionable in a prison for the infected. What was a poetic, exhaustively-brilliant piece of fiction has now become a clunky, clattering, ever-collapsing film of bludgeoning rhetoric.

The woman (Julianne Moore) tags along with her ophthalmologist husband (Mark Ruffalo) when he is struck by the blindness and sent to the initial holding facility for the infected. Visually plagued by random flashes of pure white, the film hams up Saramago's eloquent metaphor as the wards of the facility become factions. One splinter supports a dictator (Gael García Bernal) and an accountant (Maury Chaykin) who garner the entirety of the rations supplied by the army. Possessions and eventually women are traded for meager portions as the nameless woman begins to consider her tolerance in the face of a shadowy, violent orgy that even Argentine provocateur Gaspar Noé might find a little too much.

Continue reading: Blindness Review

Sukiyaki Western Django Review


Very Good
Takeshi Miike's spaghetti western mash-up, Sukiyaki Western Django, is a mystery wrapped in a riddle inside an enigma. This Ramen on the Range is Miike's first American feature, perversely cast with Japanese actors in 99 percent of the roles and instructed to speak in contorted English, rendering most of the dialogue indecipherable; it takes some getting used to to hear line readings like "It's dah end da da road for youi." The other 1 percent of the cast is the rabid American film geek director Quentin Tarantino, clearly having the time of his life like a ticket to Disneyland. Tarantino is Ringo, a lonesome roads gunslinger, who sets the stage for the tale and speaks in an equally indecipherable western dialect that becomes even more obscure during a long spiel concerning Gion Shoja temple bells, with Tarantino inexplicably lapsing into a thick, flannel-tongued Toshiro Mifune accent halfway through his oration.

Ringo engages in some mighty fancy gunplay concerning a rattlesnake and an egg in front of a blatantly false campfire set that looks like it came out of the old kids' show Riders in the Sky. He then commences to tell the tale of a pale rider (Hideaki Ito) with a garish gun who appears through a howling Kurosawa haze in a western town lorded over by two rival clans -- the red-garbed Heike clan, led by the psychotic Kiyomori (Koicho Sato), who insists that everyone call him Henry, and the white-garbed Gengi clan, led by the cool, sleek, walking-manga illustration Yoshitsune (Yusuke Iseya). Before this cryptic Man With No Name can utter, "You going to come at me or whistle Dixie?" he commences to play one clan against the other, and soon bullets, bodies, and blood fly through the air like an in-progress Jackson Pollock painting. As the schizophrenic town sheriff sings at one point as the cast reloads, "I die. You die. She dies. He dies. We all die."

Continue reading: Sukiyaki Western Django Review

Casshern Review


Good
Exhausting, this remake of a '70s anime film was produced at the same time as Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow, using the same device of all-CGI backdrops combined with real actors. Well, mostly CGI backdrops, and mostly real actors. Too bad the one-note plot -- mutant race attacks the world and only a mythical superhero can save it -- is tired and dull, and can't even begin to carry its 140-minute length. It really wears you down.
Yusuke Iseya

Yusuke Iseya Quick Links

Video Film RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Actor


Drake Launches Intense New Short Film 'Please Forgive Me'

Drake Launches Intense New Short Film 'Please Forgive Me'

The rapper teams up with Apple Music on his latest project.

The Cast Of 'Will And Grace' Have Reunited, But What Are They Up To?

The Cast Of 'Will And Grace' Have Reunited, But What Are They Up To?

The NBC series ended a decade ago, but Will, Grace, Karen and Jack haven't changed a bit.

Advertisement
Idina Menzel Flashes Gigantic Sparkler Following Engagement

Idina Menzel Flashes Gigantic Sparkler Following Engagement

Now THAT'S an engagement ring. Good job, Aaron Lohr!

Robbie Williams Announces New Album 'Heavy Entertainment Show'

Robbie Williams Announces New Album 'Heavy Entertainment Show'

The album is Williams’ first release since 2013’s ‘Swings Both Ways’.

Dev Patel Is A Lost Boy In Touching True Story Drama 'Lion'

Dev Patel Is A Lost Boy In Touching True Story Drama 'Lion'

There's already an Oscars buzz surrounding this movie.

Advertisement

Yusuke Iseya Movies

Rurouni Kenshin 2 - Trailer Trailer

Rurouni Kenshin 2 - Trailer Trailer

Kenshin Himura (Takeru Satoh) was once a legendary swordsman throughout the civil war that swept...

13 Assassins Movie Review

13 Assassins Movie Review

Carefully paced to draw out the internal warfare as much as the blood-and-guts variety, this...

Blindness Trailer

Blindness Trailer

Watch the trailer for BlindnessWhat would you do if a virus was spreading blindness so...

Advertisement
Blindness Movie Review

Blindness Movie Review

Fernando Meirelles' Blindness was adapted from the novel written by Portuguese Nobel-laureate Jose Saramago. The...

Sukiyaki Western Django Movie Review

Sukiyaki Western Django Movie Review

Takeshi Miike's spaghetti western mash-up, Sukiyaki Western Django, is a mystery wrapped in a riddle...

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.