Yael Fogiel

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Jellyfish Review


Good
Like figures in a Robert Altman film left too long in the sun, and who possibly never had that much going on upstairs to begin with, the characters of Etgar Keret and Shira Geffen's Jellyfish wander about and go missing in their own lives, eventually washing up on the Tel Aviv beach like the silent hulks of dead jellyfish scattered across the sands. There's action and episode here, but little purpose or necessity, just people trying to find their way in a world that baffles them with its willful obtuseness, and more often than not, gets them lost in the process. Everything comes back to the sea.

With the only real connective tissue among them being the grey and somewhat mournful Mediterranean and a certain cluelessness about their lives, the three women whose stories constitute Jellyfish seem specialists in not getting what they want. The most painful to behold is Batya (Sarah Adler), a dizzy-headed and recently-dumped young woman who waitresses at a wedding reception hall and always seems on the verge of getting fired. (And who could blame her? It's the kind of place that requires waitresses to wear bachelorette party-style tiaras while working.) Unable to connect with her father, a clueless old fool with a nervous anorexic of a new girlfriend who's about Batya's age, or her mother, who's too busy organizing charity functions to pay much attention to her child, Batya only seems to focus when she finds herself the unwitting guardian of a nameless and mute young girl (Nikol Leidman) who seemed literally to wash up on the beach.

Continue reading: Jellyfish Review

Voyages Review


Extraordinary
Emmanuel Finkiel, the director of Voyages, was once an assistant director to the late, great Krzystof Kieslowski (The Decalogue, Red). Perhaps from Kieslowski the French filmmaker learned to portray daily life with such quiet intensity and deep profoundness. Voyages reminds us that life is an ongoing memory, a way of coping with the present by looking into the past.

The film is composed of three separate stories about people searching for their relatives, all of whom have had lives forever changed by the horrors of the World War II. The first story begins with a group of French Holocaust survivors who make a pilgrimage to Auschwitz. On the way, they stop at an old Jewish cemetery, passing by monuments to the victims of the Warsaw Ghetto in Poland. Before reaching the site of the Jewish death camp, the bus in which they travel breaks down. In distress, they argue and reminisce about their past; when they interact, the lost world of Eastern European Jewry echoes in their intonations, gestures, and language.

Continue reading: Voyages Review

Yael Fogiel

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Chance The Rapper's 'Coloring Book' Enters Billboard Chart On Streaming Alone

Chance The Rapper's 'Coloring Book' Enters Billboard Chart On Streaming Alone

The album is the first in history to chart without selling a single copy.

Idina Menzel Responds To 'Give Elsa A Girlfriend' Viral Campaign

Idina Menzel Responds To 'Give Elsa A Girlfriend' Viral Campaign

Earlier this month a twitter campaign asking Disney to make Elsa their first LGBT princess in the ‘Frozen’ sequel went viral.

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