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Winona Ryder Defends Ex Johnny Depp: "He Was Never Abusive Towards Me"


Winona Ryder Johnny Depp Amber Heard

Winona Ryder has spoken out in defence of her ex-boyfriend Johnny Depp amid allegations that he was physically abusive towards estranged wife Amber Heard. Ryder told Time that Depp was never abusive towards her and although their relationship was decades ago she finds the allegations “unimaginable”.

Winona RyderWinona Ryder has defended ex-boyfriend Johnny Depp.

"I can only speak from my own experience, which was wildly different than what is being said," Ryder told said. ”He was never, never that way towards me. Never abusive at all towards me. I only know him as a really good, loving, caring guy who is very, very protective of the people that he loves."

Continue reading: Winona Ryder Defends Ex Johnny Depp: "He Was Never Abusive Towards Me"

'Heathers' Musical Fails To Recapture Majesty Of Movie Original


Winona Ryder Christian Slater Kevin Murphy

With Idina Menzel's 'If/Then' scoring strong reviews following its opening on Broadway this week, the pressure was on Laurence O'Keefe and Kevin Murphy's Heathers to follow suit. The new musical is based on the much-loved 1988 movie starring Winona Ryder and Christian Slater about four girls in a clique at a fictional Ohio high school.

Carly Rae Jepsen HeathersCarly Rae Jepsen At The Opening of the 'Heathers' Musical 

A cult classic, the movie regularly ranks as one of the greatest coming-of-age movies of all time, despite being a box-office failure. So far, the reviews for the musical have been decidedly mixed.

Continue reading: 'Heathers' Musical Fails To Recapture Majesty Of Movie Original

Winona Ryder - Screening of Disconnect at the SVA Visual Arts Theater - New York, NY, United States - Saturday 13th April 2013

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Winona Ryder - Winona Ryder is seen out and about in Manhattan with a friend. - New York City - Tuesday 9th April 2013

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Winona Ryder - New York screening of 'Disconnect' at the SVA Theater in Manhattan - New York City, NY, United States - Tuesday 9th April 2013

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A Week In Movies: Oscar Predictions For Jessica Chastain, Jennifer Lawrence, Denzel Washington, Daniel Day-Lewis And Anne Hathaway While Iceman And Mud Trailers Hit The Web


Jessica Chastain Jennifer Lawrence Kathryn Bigelow Anne Hathaway Denzel Washington Daniel Day Lewis Robert Zemeckis Michael Shannon James Franco Winona Ryder Reese Witherspoon

Golden Globes
Jessica Chastain and Jennifer Lawrence battle over Best Actress, Denzel Washington and Daniel Day-Lewis meet over Best Actor And Anne Hathaway favorite for Best Supporting Actress. While Iceman (James Franco, Winona Ryder) and Mud (Matthew McConnaughey and Reese Witherspoon) Trailers Hit The Web.

It's awards season for the film industry, so it's no coincidence that most stories this week centre on actors and filmmakers who are up for a variety of statuettes. Last Sunday's Golden Globes are increasingly seen as a little more than a promotional opportunity for hopeful Oscar nominees, and since they have winners in both drama and musical/comedy categories, they can spread the love around more than other groups. Unlike most years, there is no movie poised to sweep the Oscars this year.

Although Jessica Chastain for Zero Dark Thirty is gaining on her, Jennifer Lawrence for Silver Linings Playbook is the front-runner for Best Actress. Facing a huge crowd of fans, she stopped to sign autographs and pose for photos on her way to David Letterman's show this week.

Continue reading: A Week In Movies: Oscar Predictions For Jessica Chastain, Jennifer Lawrence, Denzel Washington, Daniel Day-Lewis And Anne Hathaway While Iceman And Mud Trailers Hit The Web

Winona Ryder Monday 24th September 2012 Disney's 'Frankenweenie' premiere at the El Capitan Theatre

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Winona Ryder Thursday 20th September 2012 Fantastic Fest’s opening night World Premiere screening of 'Frankenweenie' held at the Alamo Drafthouse Lamar theatre

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Tim Burton, Winona Ryder, Martin Landau, Cahrlie Tahan and Allison Abbate
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Winona Ryder Thursday 20th September 2012 Fantastic Fest 2012 - Frankenweenie Premiere - Arrivals

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Chris Evans and Winona Ryder - Chris Evans, Winona Ryder, Ariel Vromen, and Ariel Vromen Monday 10th September 2012 2012 Toronto International Film Festival - 'The Iceman' premiere arrival at the Princess of Wales Theatre.

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Chris Evans and Winona Ryder
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Chris Evans

Winona Ryder Monday 10th September 2012 2012 Toronto International Film Festival - 'The Iceman' Photo Call.

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Ray Liotta, Chris Evans, Michael Shannon and Winona Ryder
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Frankenweenie Trailer


Victor Frankenstein is a young fanatic of science and loves making home movies with his pet bull terrier and best friend, Sparky. On discovering that his dog has died, he is devastated and will do anything to bring him back. His mother tries to offer comfort, telling Victor that Sparky will always be in his heart, but nothing she says makes him feel any better; that is, until, she says, 'If we could bring him back, we would' which triggers an idea in Victor's head - even more so after a science class at school shows how you can use electricity to stimulate muscle movement in deceased animals. He takes a trip to the cemetery and sets up a makeshift laboratory in which he attempts to rouse Sparky using various pieces of scientific equipment. When there is no movement from the dog, Victor is disappointed but, suddenly, Sparky starts moving and leaps off the table to his owner's utter delight. Victor has to hide him away in the attic of his house to avoid suspicion from his parents. However, Sparky escapes into the streets terrifying the neighbours and revealing secrets to the world that are probably best left undiscovered.

Continue: Frankenweenie Trailer

Winona Ryder 'Frankenweenie' Character Image

Posted on 20 June 2012

Winona Ryder 'Frankenweenie' Character Image

Winona Ryder Saturday 10th December 2011 Winona Ryder leaves Barney's New York in Beverly Hills after doing some Christmas shopping Beverly Hills, California

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Winona Ryder - Sunday 30th January 2011 at Screen Actors Guild Los Angeles, California

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The Dilemma Review


Weak
A lack of focus leaves this film neither funny enough to be a comedy nor astute enough to be a drama. Although it's clearly trying to be both, there's nothing about the story or characters that grabs our attention.

Best buddies Ronny and Nick (Vaughn and James) are trying to get their business off the ground, creating muscle-car effects for electric vehicles. One day Ronny spots Nick's wife Geneva (Ryder) kissing another man (Tatum). He's afraid to tell Nick because they're bidding for their first big contract. And he can't tell his own girlfriend Beth (Connelly), because he's planning to propose. So he confronts Geneva, who tells Ronny that her marriage is complicated. So what should Ronny do next?

Continue reading: The Dilemma Review

Black Swan Review


Extraordinary
Aronofsky takes his usual bravura cinematic approach to this harrowing psychological thriller set in a New York ballet company. Not only is it unlike any film we've ever seen, but it leaves us shaken by its boldly evocative themes.

In a noted ballet company, Nina (Portman) is a rising star who's up for the lead in a new production of Swan Lake. She's fiercely aware of the fact that the previous lead ballerina (Ryder) has been casually discarded while younger newcomer Lilly (Kunis) is already threatening Nina's position. Or is Nina just being paranoid? As opening night approaches, Nina begins to clash with everyone around her, from Lilly to her mercurial director (Cassel) and domineering mother (Hershey). And reality starts slipping out of her grasp.

Continue reading: Black Swan Review

Winona Ryder - Wednesday 19th January 2011 at ITV Studios London, England

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Winona Ryder Thursday 6th January 2011 World premiere of 'The Dilemma' held at the AMC River East Theater - Arrivals Chicago, USA

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Black Swan Trailer


Nina has always strived to be the best dancer in the New York City ballet company she belongs to, driven by the company director and her mother, Nina starts to feel like she's moving in the right direction. When the company decide they're going to perform Swan Lake, the director, Thomas Leroy, must choose a girl to play the innocent White Swan and one to play the Black Swan who's an altogether darker character.

Continue: Black Swan Trailer

Natalie Portman, Darren Aronofsky, Mila Kunis, Vincent Cassell and Winona Ryder - Producer Scott Franklin, Natalie Portman, Mila Kunis and Vincent Cassell, director Darren Aronofsky and Winona Ryder Tuesday 30th November 2010 at Ziegfeld Theatre New York City, USA

Natalie Portman, Darren Aronofsky, Mila Kunis, Vincent Cassell and Winona Ryder
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The Dilemma Trailer


Ronny and Nick are best buddies and business partners, their partners are good friends and they all spend a lot of their lives together in one way or another. When Ronny catches Nick's wife passionately kissing a younger and very attractive guy, he can't believe his eyes.

Continue: The Dilemma Trailer

Winona Ryder Tuesday 14th September 2010 The 35th Toronto International Film Festival - 'Black Swan' press conference held at the Hyatt Regency Hotel. Toronto, Canada

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Winona Ryder Monday 13th September 2010 The 35th Toronto International Film Festival - Toronto, Canada

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Winona Ryder - Tuesday 19th January 2010 at Bristol Farms Los Angeles, California

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The Private Lives Of Pippa Lee Review


Excellent
As a more emotional take on the themes examined in American Beauty, this internalised drama is subtle and unpredictable. It also features terrific performances from an eclectic cast.

Pippa (Wright) is married to the much-older Herb (Arkin), a publisher who hates that he's now retired. But it's Pippa whose world is starting to unravel, as she reaches the point where she needs more than being a trophy wife and mother to two now-grown kids (Kazan and McDonald). Her sleepwalking antics indicate that her subconscious has already figured this out, but it'll take a look at her childhood (played by Lively and youngster Madeline McNulty) to help her see what she needs to do next.

Continue reading: The Private Lives Of Pippa Lee Review

Winona Ryder - Monday 4th May 2009 at Metropolitan Museum Of Art New York City, USA

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The Informers Review


Bad
The drug-addled zombies lurching through Gregor Jordan's The Informers are relics, dinosaurs from a decadent decade who belong in a museum, not a movie theater. Their destructively self-absorbed attitudes might have shocked audiences in 1983, the year the picture is set. Since then, however, we've spent too much time in the dead zones of Melrose Place, The O.C., and The Hills to be shaken by southern California's over-privileged fraternity.

Like a soap opera, Informers introduces multiple characters and touches on their issues. The nicest ones are stoners, voyeurs, and adulterers. On the flip side, we get kidnappers, drug dealers, and pedophiles.

Continue reading: The Informers Review

Winona Ryder Thursday 13th November 2008 Los Angeles premiere of 'Milk' at the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences - arrivals Los Angeles, California

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Winona Ryder and Marc Jacobs Monday 8th September 2008 Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Spring 2009 - Marc Jacobs - arrivals - held at the Armory New York City, USA

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Winona Ryder and Marc Jacobs
Winona Ryder and Marc Jacobs

Winona Ryder Sunday 7th September 2008 Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Spring 2009 - Tracy Reese - Arrivals New York City, USA

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Winona Ryder

Sex And Death 101 Review


OK
Daniel Waters has one of Hollywood's most intriguing resumes. After writing his first film, Heathers, Waters trolled through the Hollywood meat grinder, writing some of the '90s worst big-budget movies: Demolition Man, The Adventures of Ford Fairline, and the widely-razzed Hudson Hawk.

Waters dropped out of Hollywood for nearly a decade before reviving himself to write and direct the largely forgotten Happy Campers. After another six year hiatus he returned again with Sex and Death 101, which has the distinction of reuniting Waters with Heathers star Winona Ryder... who's been through her own travails, as well.

Continue reading: Sex And Death 101 Review

Night On Earth Review


Very Good
Riding around five shaded cityscapes in four different countries, Jim Jarmusch's nocturnal delight Night on Earth has the esteem of being the auteur's most accessible exercise to date while also being his least seen. After its premiere at the 29th New York Film Festival, this set of through-the-windshield vignettes was picked up for a short theatrical run in May of 1992 before it was released on VHS and only released on DVD in foreign markets (Australia put out two separate editions). That was until those noblest practitioners of cinephilia over at Criterion took a special interest in Jarmusch, releasing both Earth and his 1984 opus Stranger Than Paradise, which also includes the director's fascinating debut feature Permanent Vacation.

Throughout the course of one night, we are driven around in five separate taxi cabs that range from familiar ports of L.A. and New York City to the echoing streets of Paris and Rome to the final ride through the frozen-over metropolis of Helsinki, right as the sun is rising. In Los Angeles, a big-time agent (Gena Rowlands) tries to seduce her rough-and-tumble cab driver (an insolent Winona Ryder) into becoming an actress. While in New York, a jerky Brooklynite (the superb Giancarlo Esposito) teaches his German cab driver (Armin Mueller-Stahl) how to drive, talk, and jive correctly while also trying to escort his sister-in-law (Rosie Perez) home.

Continue reading: Night On Earth Review

The Darwin Awards Review


Good
Poor Finn Taylor can't catch a break. By all reports he's the nicest guy in the world, and he typically toils for three or four years on each indie flick he directs. When they finally hit the screen they flop. His last outing, Cherish, was a bizarre story about a cop falling in love with a girl under house arrest who he's assigned to watch. I guess it wasn't bizarre enough, though. I had to reread my review of it just to fully remember what it was about. Cherish bombed with a $180,000 gross.

Four years later, Taylor drops another oddball flick on us, and the trouble is obvious before frame one. For starters, the name of the movie is The Darwin Awards, which sounds like it's going to be a documentary about those nutty people who kill themselves doing stupid things, thus earning posthumous "Darwin Awards" (as written up in a series of books of the same name) for ridding the gene pool of their DNA.

Continue reading: The Darwin Awards Review

The Ten Review


Very Good
In a sane, level-headed and clear-eyed world, early '90s sketch group The State (also a TV show) would still be practicing their ambitious and absurd brand of screwball comedy. Sadly, Scooter Libby gets fresh air and sunshine while the boys and girls of The State have been relegated to obscurity, scattering like cockroaches in a well-lit kitchen to different comedic prospects. Most of the members found their way to Comedy Central's cannily-hilarious Reno 911! where State leads Thomas Lennon, Ben Garant, and Kerri Kenney are series cornerstones. Almost every other member of the troupe has made a recurring or cameo spot on the program but the effect has never been as lively or precarious as the best moments of The State.

With a few celebrities on board, the group assembles (with a few exceptions) for key member David Wain's The Ten, a foul-mouthed, dirty-as-diapers, Republican-baiting retelling of the Ten Commandments. The stories are stitched together by a loose narrative thread involving a man (Paul Rudd) serving as narrator who is leaving his wife (Famke Janssen) for a younger ditz (Jessica Alba).

Continue reading: The Ten Review

Mr. Deeds Review


Weak
Adam Sandler really wants you to like him. Oh, and he's also very sorry for Little Nicky, an experiment that resembled your typical Sandler flick but had the drawing power of my socks after a full-court basketball game. This time out, Sandler plays it extremely safe in an effort to please his slighted fan base and cover his once-dominated bases. Too bad repeated trips under the microscope of comedy ultimately have produced a lukewarm version of material the comedian relied upon years ago.

Sandler fills the title role in Mr. Deeds (a remake of the ancient Gary Cooper film), playing an unassuming New Hampshire resident and aspiring greeting card writer who learns he's the heir to a $40 billion media conglomerate. Since happiness isn't tied to financial gains in the Granite state, the newfound fortune doesn't faze Deeds, though he does agree to accompany two shareholders (Peter Gallagher and Erick Avari) back to Manhattan to sign what he's told is required paperwork. Once in N.Y., the "big city vs. big country" gags march down Park Avenue with mixed results.

Continue reading: Mr. Deeds Review

A Scanner Darkly Review


Weak

When Richard Linklater released Waking Life in 2001, he became the granddaddy of a whole new kind of filmmaking process. The film had been shot and edited like a normal feature, then sent to computer jocks who basically painted over each frame, giving the images a surreal quality of undulating colors that fell somewhere between photography and animation -- an acid-trip philosophy lesson.

Linklater returns to the same technique once again (and for the last time, from what he has said, due to rampant production difficulties) for a much more literal acid trip. Based on the Philip K. Dick novel of the same name, A Scanner Darkly is a feature-length PSA on the evils of drugs and the potentially-as-damaging efforts to ferret them out of society.

Continue reading: A Scanner Darkly Review

How To Make An American Quilt Review


Bad
I am dumbfounded about where to begin writing about this experiment-in-filmmaking-gone-terribly-wrong, How To Make an American Quilt. Some of the best actresses working in film (Anne Bancroft, Ellen Burstyn, Winona Ryder, Jean Simmons, Lois Smith, Samantha Mathis, and Claire Danes, to name a few) appear in this movie. And I can't begin to imagine how such a wide array of talents agreed to appear in such a dreadful picture.

Ryder plays the cheeky Finn, a precocious grad student pondering a marriage proposal. Having second thoughts, she decides to spend the summer with a gaggle of quilting relatives and their friends, just to sort things out. Well, we see right off the bat that this probably wasn't such a great idea, because each and every one of these people is completely insane.

Continue reading: How To Make An American Quilt Review

Little Women (1994) Review


Excellent
Hollywood did put out one decent flick over the 1994 holidays, and that was Little Women, another remake of Louisa May Alcott's famed novel. Winona Ryder steals the show, and most of the supporting cast are perfect. The story of Little Women is given a new breath of life with this film, and it is still as relevant about our place in the world and overcoming its man-made obstacles as it was when it was written. I mean, I'm like, you know, a guy... and I really dug the movie. Alvarado and Mathis shine above an altogether good cast (while Danes disappoints).

Reality Bites Review


Very Good
Back in 1994, Reality Bites was branded by everyone from marketers to critics as a movie that encapsulated a generation - more specifically, Generation X, who were around college graduation age (including myself). And seeing as Lelaina (Winona Ryder), the movie's heroine, kicks off this trendy flick with her valedictorian graduation speech, it's no wonder so many "slackers" (as we Gen X-ers were labeled, thanks to another "iconic" film released just a few years prior) felt so spoken to by its quippy dialogue and great characters, and why everyone else tended to label Reality Bites a film symbolic of its lost generation.

The reality of Reality Bites is that it's simply too lightweight a romantic comedy to succeed at being emblematic; and, as far as I can see, it never was really meant to carry such heft. This directorial debut of then-green Ben Stiller portrays twenty-somethings floundering in dead-end jobs, nursing big dreams, or simply trying to find themselves as they enter the real world. In the least, it's a slice of life; and at its best, it's an often funny and very endearing little movie.

Continue reading: Reality Bites Review

Autumn In New York Review


OK
No matter how shrewd, wealthy, or debonair a man can be, in a Hollywood drama, he is always humbled by love. Richard Gere is no exception to this rule, and for the second time in a year, he is typecast in yet another implausible romantic lead. Why even bother establishing his character? Like always, he's successful, powerful, and sexy, yet unable to curb his womanizing ways. Only this time it's not Julia Roberts as the flamboyant prostitute or eccentric altar ditcher, but a weepy Winona Ryder, who is half his age and happens to be dying of a rare heart disease. Sound like a winner? It isn't.

Autumn in New York, directed by Joan Chen (Xiu Xiu: The Sent Down Girl), is the recycled love story of a man who has it all but nobody to share it with. The tacky promo, "He taught her how to live, she taught him how to love," basically explains the plot in a nutshell. Flourishing Manhattan restaurant owner Will Keane (Gere) sees something in the beauty, wit, and innocence of young Charlotte (Winona Ryder), despite the fact that he dated her deceased mother in the past. On the flip side, Charlotte has merely a year to live and is not afraid to die because she has nothing truly worth living for. The two find sustenance in one another, but as all love stories go, they endure trying times. Winona is either too young or too sick, and he can't control his libido or escape his shady past. So they're meant for one another, but how long can it last?

Continue reading: Autumn In New York Review

Celebrity Review


Excellent
Another fall, another movie from the Woodman.

Shot in black and white and filled with about 30 big-name stars, Celebrity is a welcome return to old-school Allen, his first really good film since 1994's Bullets Over Broadway.

Continue reading: Celebrity Review

Lost Souls Review


Bad
It looks like Winona Ryder gets two strikes in a row in 2000, as the long-delayed Lost Souls emerges as one of the worst duds of the year. How bad can it be? Well, the only moments of terror in this ostensible horror flick are brought about by the appearance of the words "Producer: Meg Ryan," giving you chills in a way that only those words can.

Hopefully the last in a line of man vs. devil movies let loose by Y2K hysteria coupled with the success of The Sixth Sense (which wisely steered clear of religious metaphors altogether), Lost Souls actually ranks below End of Days and just about ties the pitiful Bless the Child for sheer badness.

Continue reading: Lost Souls Review

Heathers Review


Extraordinary
"My teenage angst bullshit now has a body count."

Never before has murder been so much fun than at the hands of Winona Ryder and Christian Slater, perfectly cast as foils for one another in one of the blackest comedies on film. A must-see for the Gen-X set, Heathers is a scathing lambasting of the American teen in the late 1980s, but its presence will be timeless.

Continue reading: Heathers Review

Alien: Resurrection Review


Weak
I'm not entirely sure how to begin a review of the highly-anticipated (at least for me) fourth installment of the Alien series except to say... what a letdown.

Sigourney Weaver's Ellen Ripley died in Alien3, the movie that was supposed to put the nail in the Alien coffin, but thanks to the miracles of next-millennium cloning, she's back, and full of alien DNA to boot (thus making her invincible, giving her acid for blood, and generally a pretty creepy chick). This new twist has great potential, as Ripley's alien side gives her a strange kinship with the creatures... creatures that once again are loosed by idiot scientists trying to tame them.

Continue reading: Alien: Resurrection Review

Girl, Interrupted Review


Good
As near as I can tell, the 60s were about being crazy. Whether it was being crazy while fighting communists in Vietnam, or being crazy while burning bras, or being crazy while marching on Washington, the 60s resounded with insanity. So what better way to tell the story of the 60s than from within the walls of a mental ward known as Claymoore? Hence is the promise given to us in the ads of Girl, Interrupted.

The reality is a bit different.

Continue reading: Girl, Interrupted Review

Dracula (1992) Review


Very Good
Francis Ford Coppola's adaptation of the Dracula story hasn't won any praise for its claim of being true to Bram Stoker's novel (despite the aka title, Bram Stoker's Dracula), but it is a huge success in one major front: Casting. Coppola has lined up a near-perfect cast, one which is actually inspired on some fronts. For starters, Gary Oldman makes for what may be the most memorable Dracula ever (I challenge you to name another besides Bela Lugosi), and Anthony Hopkins' Van Helsing is an intriguing -- and solid -- choice. It gets even better in the smaller roles: Richard E. Grant as a physician friend of Van Helsing, Bill Campbell as a gunslinging Texan who's wooing Miss Lucy (Sadie Frost in an absurd red wig), and -- best of all -- Tom Waits as a jibbering disciple of Dracula, locked away in an asylum. And watch for Monic Bellucci as one of Dracula's brides. Altogether it's a fun movie, full of gore and special effects that were groundbreaking at the time.

Beetlejuice Review


Very Good
Tim Burton had it down pat. Hair disheveled, pallid features, the director of Pee-Wee's Big Adventure surprised Hollywood with a goth-geek style that could only be described as quirky before everything became quirky. He was the animator from the shadows who brought macabre and heartbreaking life to his early animated shorts, toy box allure to his first feature film. While Pee-Wee's Big Adventure was a hit, it was only a brief glimpse of the sideshow theatricality Burton would employ on his second feature, the riotous and ghoulish Beetlejuice.

Beetlejuice is really a simple fairy tale. Two newly dead newly weds, Adam (Alec Baldwin) and Barbara Maitland (Geena Davis), want to rid their rustic home of the gaudy yuppie transplants, the Dietz's, who've taken up residence. When old-fashioned ghost moves like rattling chains in the attic fails, they find they need the help of a "bio-exorcist," a grungy specter named Betelgeuse (Michael Keaton), who will guarantee to rid the home of unwanted occupants. That is, for a price.

Continue reading: Beetlejuice Review

The Age Of Innocence Review


Good
Little Marty Scorsese, directing a period piece? Well, it is set in New York. Only it's the late 1800s and everyone is in frilly dresses and smokes cigars. Daniel Day-Lewis takes center stage as a high-society type engaged to Ryder but entranced by her cousin Pfeiffer. How to choose between two very different girls? Ah, such is the dilemma of life. Very pretty, very long, very cold, and very tidy.

Boys Review


Bad
Twenty-five cents to the person who can explain what the point of this exercise was. The fetching Winona Ryder falls off a horse and Lukas Haas rescues her by taking her into his dorm at the all-boys prep school. Because she didn't want to go to the hospital. Haas decides he's in love so they run off to a carnival. And a car was stolen, and maybe Ryder had something to do with that. And John C. Reilly is the cop on the case! This disjointed review echoes perfectly what the sensibility of the film is: Virtually nil.

Girl, Interrupted Review


Weak

Teen angst gets the "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" treatment in "Girl, Interrupted," James Mangold's disappointingly common and commercial follow-up to his earlier, low-budget wonders "Heavy" and "Cop Land."

Poor Winona Ryder -- in her late 20s and still playing teenagers -- stars as 1960s suburban college drop-out Susanna, a compulsive writer stuck in an upscale asylum for a "rest" after mixing booze and a bottle of pain killers.

Borderline Personality Disorder is the maddeningly vague diagnosis of her psychological bugaboos -- the movie seems to want to make a point about our culture's tendency to seek scapegoats for our neuroses -- so Susanna is packed off to a New England psychiatric hospital where, in between the pill dole from the nursing staff, she writes endlessly in her dog-eared journal and fills it with tell-tale drawings the camera can cut to for moments of cheap insight.

Continue reading: Girl, Interrupted Review

Lost Souls Review


OK

If spooky movies based on tenets of Catholicism are your bag, you can do a lot worse than "Lost Souls," in which Winona Ryder stars as a once-possessed woman trying to find and save a man destined to become Satan incarnate.

It's no "Exorcist" -- although it is cashing in on that film's rerelease -- but at least this faith-based frightener doesn't invent "missing" books of the Bible to advance its plot like the pathetic action hybrid "End of Days." At least it's not inundated with shopworn demonic clichés like the pathetic "Bless the Child." At least it's not just an exercise in style over substance, like the Goth/MTV genre entry "Stigmata."

No, "Lost Souls" actually has quite a bit going for it before narrative loose ends begin to unravel the whole picture.

Continue reading: Lost Souls Review

Mr Deeds Review


Zero

As someone who watches upwards of 500 movies a year, I've seen more than my fair share of bad remakes. But I've never seen one do anything as stomach-turning as the way Adam Sandler's new movie rapes, pillages and incinerates Frank Capra's classic "Mr. Deeds Goes to Town."

Entitled just "Mr. Deeds" and punctuated with elementary dialogue and the worst kind of feel-good muzak score, it doesn't contain a single sincere moment, a single performance that would pass muster in an elementary school play or a single scene without glaring continuity problems. Different takes within the same conversations don't even sync up -- ever.

As in Capra's very funny and heartfelt hallmark, the story is about a modest, idealistic small-town schnook named Longfellow Deeds (Sandler) who inherits a fortune from a distant uncle and is swept away to New York City, where ruthless tabloid scrutiny turns him into an object of both scorn and laughter. Leading the smear campaign is an ambitious female reporter (Winona Ryder), who poses as a fellow wide-eyed out-of-towner. But while trying to railroad Deeds into splashy front-page behavior, she falls for the guy, has a change of heart and decides to help save him from the urban wolves.

Continue reading: Mr Deeds Review

Autumn In New York Review


Weak

In "Autumn In New York," terminally tumor-bound Winona Ryder and her seriously senior lover Richard Gere have a whole conversation about what it means to be "unique" as opposed to "typical."

Oh, the irony.

An utterly typical movie lacking even a hint of uniqueness, "Autumn" is a Hallmark card redeaux of the "Love Story"-style tragic romance with a September-May twist.

Continue reading: Autumn In New York Review

Zoolander Review


Good

"The fashion industry has been behind every major assassination in the last 200 years," says a bearded and scruffy, conspiracy-mad David Duchovny in Ben Stiller's ludicrously amusing "Zoolander" -- and only the world's most vapid male model can break his brainwashing and to put a stop to it all.

No, not Fabio. "Too smart," says the Karl Lagerfeld-like leader of a shadowy international syndicate of couture designers, while picking "a beautiful self-absorbed simpleton who can be molded like Jell-O" to kill the prime minister of Malaysia. I mean, the man plans to end slave wages for sweatshop garment workers in his country. He simply must be stopped!

Enter pouty, super-superficial mannequin man Derek Zoolander (Stiller). Desperate to rescue his career after losing the Male Model of the Year Award (insert oh-so-VH-1 ceremony here) to his up-and-coming rival, the dreaded, sexy surfer stud Hansel (Owen Wilson), Derek is ripe for reprogramming. Hired by the industry's designer de jour -- played by Will Ferrell in a poodle wig, charcoal eyeliner and a leather corset -- Derek is brainwashed to snap at a runway show for a new line of homeless bum-inspired ready-to-wear, called Derelicte (that's derelict with an "e" on the end). Ferrell has invited the Third World leader to sit in the front row.

Continue reading: Zoolander Review

Winona Ryder

Winona Ryder Quick Links

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Winona Ryder

Date of birth

29th October, 1971

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Female

Height

1.61




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Winona Ryder Movies

Edward Scissorhands - Clips Trailer

Edward Scissorhands - Clips Trailer

Edward Scissorhands is no ordinary boy, as his name may tell. Created by a genius...

Homefront Movie Review

Homefront Movie Review

With a powerhouse cast and an anaemic script, this violent revenge thriller never quite gets...

Homefront - International Trailer Trailer

Homefront - International Trailer Trailer

Phil Broker is an ex-cop sadly widowed and left with his 10-year-old daughter Maddie. The...

Homefront Trailer

Homefront Trailer

Phil Broker is a former DEA agent who moves to a beautiful small town with...

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The Iceman Movie Review

The Iceman Movie Review

Much more involving than the usual hitman thriller, this film takes a deliberately personal approach...

The Iceman Trailer

The Iceman Trailer

Richard Kuklinski is a contract killer who has murdered over 100 men for a variety...

Frankenweenie Movie Review

Frankenweenie Movie Review

With a snappy sense of childish curiosity and lavishly skilled animation, Tim Burton makes one...

Frankenweenie Trailer

Frankenweenie Trailer

Victor Frankenstein is a young fanatic of science and loves making home movies with his...

Frankenweenie Trailer

Frankenweenie Trailer

Victor Frankenstein is a young boy with an interest in science and home movies....

The Dilemma Movie Review

The Dilemma Movie Review

A lack of focus leaves this film neither funny enough to be a comedy nor...

Black Swan Movie Review

Black Swan Movie Review

Aronofsky takes his usual bravura cinematic approach to this harrowing psychological thriller set in a...

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