Wim Wenders

Wim Wenders

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30th Film Independent Spirit Awards

Donato Wenders and Wim Wenders - 30th Film Independent Spirit Awards - Arrivals at Tent on the beach, Independent Spirit Awards - Santa Monica, California, United States - Saturday 21st February 2015

Donato Wenders and Wim Wenders

2015 Film Independent Spirit Awards - Arrivals

Wim Wenders and wife Donata Wenders - 2015 Film Independent Spirit Awards - Arrivals at Independent Spirit Awards - Hollywood, California, United States - Saturday 21st February 2015

Wim Wenders and wife Donata Wenders
Wim Wenders and wife Donata Wenders

The Salt Of The Earth - Trailer


On 8th February, 1944, Sebastião Salgado was born in Brazil. He went on to gain a scholarship for master's degree in economics, before getting married. When his wife bought a camera, Salgado took his first ever picture, of his wife. This inspired a career shift, with Salgado becoming enamoured by the very idea of photography, and taking it up as a full tie profession. Salgado travelled the globe, taking pictures of everyone and everything, yet there was always one constant in his work: the effects that people had on the world, and the art of photography.

Continue: The Salt Of The Earth - Trailer

BIFF - Everything Will Be Fine - Photocall

Wim Wenders - 65th Berlin International Film Festival (Berlinale) - Everything Will Be Fine - Photocall - Berlin, Germany - Tuesday 10th February 2015

Wim Wenders

The 65th Berlin Film Festival/Berlinale 2015 - 'Everything Will Be Fine' - Arrivals

Wim Wenders and Donata Wenders - The 65th Berlin Film Festival/Berlinale 2015 - 'Everything Will Be Fine' - Arrivals - Berlin, Germany - Tuesday 10th February 2015

Wim Wenders and Donata Wenders
Wim Wenders and Donata Wenders
Wim Wenders and Donata Wenders
Wim Wenders, Charlotte Gainsbourg, James Franco, Robert Naylor and Marie-Josée Croze
Wim Wenders, Charlotte Gainsbourg, James Franco, Robert Naylor and Marie-Josée Croze

BIFF- Everything Will Be Fine - Photocall

Wim Wenders and James Franco - 65th Berlin International Film Festival (Berlinale) - Everything Will Be Fine - Photocall at the Grand Hyatt Hotel - Berlin, Germany - Tuesday 10th February 2015

Wim Wenders and James Franco
Wim Wenders and James Franco
Wim Wenders, Charlotte Gainsbourg, James Franco, Robert Naylor and Marie-Josée Croze
Wim Wenders, Charlotte Gainsbourg, James Franco, Robert Naylor and Marie-Josée Croze
Wim Wenders, Charlotte Gainsbourg, James Franco, Robert Naylor and Marie-Josée Croze

Land of Plenty Review


Weak
Wim Wenders' sense of subtlety and grace started to decline somewhere in the '90s, and in post-9/11 he's clearly lost it altogether. Land of Plenty is his meditation on the Big Event (and I guess at this point we should assume that every film director will eventually make one... come on Spielberg, what's holding you back?). Kudos for having the stones to have the movie take place all the way across the country in L.A., but could the story be more overbearing?

John Diehl plays a Vietnam vet who spends his days in a van keeping tabs on suspicious personages, particularly those with turbans. He's constantly narrating the action into a tape recorder, and he even has a flunky willing to help him "analyze these chemicals by oh-nine-hundred." This is contrasted with his long-lost niece (Michelle Williams), a mopey girl who's all too happy to spend all day working in a soup kitchen. The digital video looks suitably present and "real," but Wenders' wandering sentiments fail to add anything new to what has become a mountain of conversation on the New Paranoia and What the Hell Are We Supposed To Do Now? It's not exactly lazy filmmaking, but it's hard to give it your complete attention.

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Beyond The Clouds Review


OK
Michelangelo Antonioni obsesses on the naked bodies of a good half-dozen Euro-stars in this wandering tour of western European sexual relations in various combinations. Based on a collection of his own short stories, Antonioni connects four such tales (infidelity, happenstance, old-fashioned horniness, etc.) with the narrative of a film director (John Malkovich) who's looking for a story to base his next movie on. We find we're lucky enough if we can just get one story out of this two-hour ordeal, which wanders aimlessly in art-house hell as often as it enchants.

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Buena Vista Social Club Review


OK
Do you like Cuban music? Maybe you've never tried it, and like your mother said, you won't know until you do. Wim Wenders, best known for making Wings of Desire, takes a video camera and makes a home movie/documentary about octagenarian musicians in Cuba. Too bad there's not more music, 'cause these old folks are dry as dust.

The Million Dollar Hotel Review


Grim
Three words: Story by Bono.

Yikes! This marginal flick puts detective Mel Gibson in charge of investigating the murder of a billionnaire's son in a wacky hotel overrun by mental patients who can't afford the regular nut bin. And well, that's about all there is to tell, except that the title was once The Billion Dollar Hotel. That's a big downgrade.

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Wings of Desire Review


Excellent
Wim Wenders' 1987 opus Wings of Desire, opens on gloomy Berlin, still crumbling into disrepair after its destruction by the bombing of 1945 and decades of neglect. On the soundtrack we hear the poem that will reverberate throughout: "Als das kind kind war," (or "When the child was still a child") and see the angels. Dressed in dark overcoats and wearing expressions of quiet benevolence, they watch the city and its inhabitants (to whom they are invisible, except for the occasional child, who will point up into the sky at a figure only it can see) and listen. Their purpose isn't clear, as shown in the two angels whom Wenders focuses on - Damiel (Bruno Ganz) and Cassiel (Otto Sander) - they seem to be caretakers of memory, jotting down notes of random ephemera, listening to people's thoughts (one of the film's more amazing, and often-mimicked, tracking shots takes us through autobahn traffic, hearing the interior monologues of each driver). In one of the film's stranger notes, Peter Falk shows up playing himself(?!), in Berlin to shoot a movie. On the street, he turns out to be able to notice the presence of Damiel standing nearby and starts speaking to him about the amazing little things in life like smoking and drinking coffee: "And if you do it together, it's fantastic." Cadaverous goth rocker Nick Cave shows up as himself, too, but that makes a little more sense, the guy was just meant to be shot in black and white.

The rambling story takes on a semblance of shape when Damiel decides to literally fall from grace and become mortal after falling in love with Marion (Solveig Dommartin), a trapeze artist. Plopped onto the streets of Berlin (shot in color now that he's human), Damiel strides around the city searching for his love, with a look of transfixed delight on his face as he takes in every detail that he was only able to study before, and can now experience; while Cassiel watches with a mournful expression in his black-and-white world.

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The American Friend Review


OK
Ripley's Game the third novel (of five) in Patricia Highsmith's Tom Ripley series, and thus it marks a semingly strange choice for Wim Wenders to jump right into the mythology. (The Talented Mr. Ripley and Purple Noon are both based on the first book.) Then again, Ripley's Game will become a feature film again later this year, starring John Malkovich.

On the other hand, the book stands on its own fairly well, namely because it doesn't have an awful lot to do with Ripley himself. As the story goes: We find Ripley (played by a cowboy hat-toting Dennis Hopper) later in life, working a career in art sales/forgery. He makes the acquaintance of a dying picture framer named Zimmermann (Bruno Ganz - dig the 'stache!), and eventually coerces him (through asssociates) into performing a contract murder for a large sum of money, meant to set up his family after his death.

Continue reading: The American Friend Review

Wim Wenders

Wim Wenders Quick Links

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