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Blood Father Review

Good

It's been four years since Mel Gibson played a lead role in a movie, and with all of the tabloid headlines in the meantime it's been easy to forget how magnetic he is on screen. He's looking rather grizzled in this action thriller from French filmmaker Jean-Francois Richet (Mesrine), but his piercing presence turns what's essentially a cheesy exploitation film into something remarkably gripping.

He plays an ex-con tattoo artist named Link, who lives out in California's Mojave Desert, next door to his 12-step sponsor Kirby (William H. Macy). His home may be a trashy trailer, but he has cleaned up his life. Although his quiet reverie is disturbed by thoughts of his 17-year-old daughter Lydia (Erin Moriarty), who has been missing for four years. So he's stunned when she calls him out of the blue for help. Kicking into action, he rescues her and immediately discounts her stories that the ruthless henchmen of her late gangster boyfriend Jonah (Diego Luna) are after her. It doesn't take long for Link to realise that Lydia isn't exaggerating, and as they go on the run, he turns to old prison friends (including Michael Parks, Dale Dickey and Miguel Sandoval) for help. Even though he doesn't really trust anyone.

Director Richet doesn't seem very interested in the father-daughter drama at the centre of this film, even though it's far more involving than the madcap action carnage. Gibson and Moriarty do what they can to create some chemistry amid the mayhem, but they only have a few scenes in which they can push their characters a bit further. And frankly after the set-up, the audience needs that to put the violence in context. This is mainly due to the fact that the brutal pursuit is fairly predictable, and the side characters, as well played as they are, are little more than stereotypes.

Continue reading: Blood Father Review

Blood Father Trailer


John Link hasn't been the best father, up until recently he's constantly been on the wrong side of the law and usually at the bottom end of a bottle too. Having been in prison, John and his daughter have become estranged, Lydia is actually missing and has been for years. John's only real connection to his daughter is the missing poster he keeps pinned up in his RV.

In recovery and now working a legal job as a tattoo artist, John admits that there's not much he wouldn't do to right the wrongs of his past - including losing contact with his daughter but also says there's very little he can do. When he receives a phone call from Lydia claiming that she's in serious danger, John is glad to hear his daughters voice but also worried about her safety.

As the father and daughter return to his home, John raids Lydia's possessions looking for answers and what he finds leads him to believe that she's in real danger. Lydia informs her dad that she's been living with a cartel leader and that, after accidentally shooting him, his crew is now out for vengeance. John must turn to past associates in order to formulate a plan to protect his troubled daughter.

William H. Macy - 22nd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards at The Shrine Expo Hall - Arrivals at Shrine Auditorium, Screen Actors Guild - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 30th January 2016

William H. Macy
William H. Macy

Room Review

Essential

One of the most extraordinary films of the year, this drama cleverly weaves in events from the news headlines to tell a raw, deeply involving story that's unnervingly personal. Irish director Lenny Abrahamson and writer Emma Donoghue bring these events to life with uncanny skill, using a young child's perspective to give it an extra-strong kick. And Brie Larson's central performance is so powerful that she's become the one to beat on Oscar night.

She plays Joy, a young woman who was abducted at 17 by a man she only knows as Old Nick (Sean Bridgers). The story opens as her son Jack (Jacob Tremblay) celebrates his fifth birthday in the single room where he was born and has spent his entire life. There isn't even a window to look out of so, to help him cope, Joy explains that there is no life outside the room, and everything they see on television is fake. She also gets Jack to hide whenever Nick visits, so they can't develop any kind of relationship. But as he grows up, Jack's curiosity demands more answers, and Joy finally decides to tell him the truth in the hope that he can help them escape.

Its halfway into the film when Jack's world is suddenly opened up around him in a rescue sequence that's exhilarating, terrifying and literally breathtaking. And from here, the film gets even more punchy, as Joy and Jack struggle to adapt to life in what seems like an alien landscape. Joy's parents (the great Joan Allen and William H. Macy) have split up, and her mother has a new partner (Tom McCamus), and their reunion is watched closely by the media, police and psychologists. All of this is seen through Jack's curious, observant eyes. Everyone is worried about him, but he perceptively notices that his mother is having even more trouble coping than he is.

Continue reading: Room Review

William H Macy - Celebrities at Los Angeles International (LAX) Airport - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 1st January 2016

William H Macy
William H Macy
William H Macy
William H Macy

William H. Macy - William H. Macy and his daughter go shopping at The Grove and is sttopped by a fan to pose for a selfie with a fan - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 6th December 2015

William H. Macy
William H. Macy
William H. Macy
William H. Macy
William H. Macy
William H. Macy

William H. Macy - PETA's 35th Anniversary Bash held at the Hollywood Palladium - Arrivals at Hollywood Palladium - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 30th September 2015

William H. Macy
William H. Macy
William H. Macy
William H. Macy
William H. Macy
William H. Macy

William H. Macy - Celebrities arrive at 67th Emmys Red Carpet at Microsoft Theater. at Microsoft Theatre - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 20th September 2015

William H. Macy
William H. Macy
Felicity Huffman and William H. Macy
Felicity Huffman and William H. Macy

William H. Macy - 67th Annual Emmy Awards at Microsoft Theatre at Microsoft Theatre, Emmy Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 20th September 2015

William H. Macy
Felicity Huffman and William H. Macy

William H. Macy , Felicity Huffman - Variety and Women in Film Pre-Emmy Celebration Party sponsored by Mercedes-Benz and Fiji Water at Gracias Madre - Arrivals at Gracias Madre - West Hollywood, California, United States - Friday 18th September 2015

William H. Macy and Felicity Huffman
William H. Macy and Felicity Huffman
William H. Macy and Felicity Huffman
William H. Macy and Felicity Huffman
William H. Macy and Felicity Huffman
William H. Macy and Felicity Huffman

William H. Macy - CBS, CW And Showtime 2015 Summer TCA Party at Pacific Design Center - Arrivals at Pacific Design Center - West Hollywood, California, United States - Tuesday 11th August 2015

William H. Macy
William H. Macy
Shanola Hampton and William H. Macy

William H. Macy - The CBS, The CW, and Showtime 2015 Summer TCA Party at Pacific Design Center - Arrivals at Pacific Design Center - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 10th August 2015

William H. Macy

Steve Howey, Shanola Hampton , William H. Macy - Celebrities attend the CBS, The CW, and Showtime 2015 Summer TCA Party at Pacific Design Center. at Pacific Design Center - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 11th August 2015

Steve Howey, Shanola Hampton and William H. Macy
Steve Howey, Shanola Hampton and William H. Macy
Steve Howey, Shanola Hampton and William H. Macy
Steve Howey
Steve Howey
Steve Howey

William H. Macy and Felicity Huffman - 'Stealing Cars' world premiere during the Los Angeles Film Festival at L.A. Live - Arrivals at Los Angeles Film Festival - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 13th June 2015

William H. Macy and Felicity Huffman
William H. Macy
William H. Macy
William H. Macy and Felicity Huffman
William H. Macy and Felicity Huffman

William H. Macy - 21st Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards held at The Shrine Auditorium - Press Room at Shrine Auditorium, Screen Actors Guild - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 25th January 2015

William H. Macy
William H. Macy

William H. Macy - 21st Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards Pressroom at Screen Actors Guild - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 26th January 2015

William H. Macy
William H. Macy
William H. Macy

William H. Macy and Felicity Huffman - A host of stars were photographed on the red carpet as they arrived at the 21st Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards which were held at the Shrine auditorium in Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 25th January 2015

William H. Macy and Felicity Huffman
William H. Macy and Felicity Huffman
William H. Macy and Felicity Huffman

William H. Macy and Felicity Huffman - A host of stars were photographed on the red carpet as they arrived at the 21st Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards which were held at the Shrine auditorium in Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 26th January 2015

William H. Macy and Felicity Huffman

The Wind Rises Trailer


When Jiro Horikoshi was a young boy, all he ever dreamed about was flying planes - at least he did until one night he came across Italian plane designer Caproni in one of his dreams, who subsequently told him that his poor vision means he'll never be a pilot. Jiro instead resolves to take up aeronautical engineering and design aircrafts himself . While at university, he meets a young woman named Naoko who he helps off a train during the Great Kanto Earthquake and the pair become close. His life begins to spiral, however, with his work projects becoming few and far between and Naoko's health deteriorating. But will Jiro finally realise his dream and build an aircraft of pure beauty? Or will his dream come crashing to the ground?

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The Sessions Review - Helen Hunt And John Hawkes Hailed For Sensitive Performances


Helen Hunt John Hawkes William H Macy Ben Lewin

Helen Hunt and John Hawkes star in this delicately-handled story of Mark O’Brien (Hawkes) in an iron lung, who – at the age of 38 - decides that he wishes to lose his virginity. Help comes in the form of a sex surrogate (played by Hunt), who starts a series of eight sessions, designed to lead to sex and to Mark losing his virginity. The Sessions is based on a true story and as such, the narrative takes turns that you would not necessarily expect from a scripted drama. The movie is all the richer for it and is all the richer for the stellar performances put in by Hunt, Hawkes and co-star William H Macy.

Many have wondered why The Sessions didn’t feature more in this year’s Oscars list. As it is, Helen Hunt has been nominated for the Actress in a Supporting Role award – a testament to the quality of the acting, for a movie with such unusual subject matter. Our reviewer was impressed by the handling of The Sessions, by breakthrough director Ben Lewin: “Lewin refuses to shy away from any aspect of this story, confronting everything in honest, sometimes uncomfortable ways that are never remotely sentimentalized. It would be easy to drift into syrupy schmaltz with this kind of material, but the script maintains a bracingly sharp wit, and the actors cleverly underplay every scene.” The remarkable thing it seems, is that viewers can identify with all of the characters onscreen, despite the unusual situation in which they are found.

The Sessions is released in UK cinemas today (January 18, 2012). 

Continue reading: The Sessions Review - Helen Hunt And John Hawkes Hailed For Sensitive Performances

The Lincoln Lawyer Review


Good
Enjoyably twisty but too shallow to be fully satisfying, this legal thriller lopes along at a pleasing pace through its overlong running time. But it's watchable mainly because we know there will be at least one big twist in the tale.

Mick (McConaughey) runs his successful L.A. law practice from his vintage Lincoln. He has a daughter with his public-prosecutor ex Maggie (Tomei) and works closely with his private-eye pal Frank (Macy). His new case involves the wealthy Louis (Phillippe), who claims he didn't violently assault a prostitute.

But the more Mick and Frank look into things, the fishier they get. And Mick will need to do some unorthodox things to win the case against the tenacious D.A. (Lucas) and achieve real justice.

Continue reading: The Lincoln Lawyer Review

The Lincoln Lawyer Trailer


Mickey Haller might not be one of the top lawyers in LA but the service he provides for his clients is an effective one. Generally Mickey defends bike gangs, prostitutes and drug dealers but when he learns of a case that might just give him a huge break, it's something he can't turn down.

Continue: The Lincoln Lawyer Trailer

Shorts Review


OK
This hyperactive adventure may keep children giggling at the sheer chaos on screen, but it'll wear out older viewers looking for something that actually holds the attention.

Toe Thompson (Bennett) is a lonely kid in school, picked on relentlessly by the school bully Helvetica (Vanier) and her big brother Cole (Gearhart). They're the children of Mr Black (Spader), owner of the monolithic company that employs everyone in town, including Toe's parents (Cryer and Mann). Then Toe finds a mysterious rainbow-coloured rock that has the ability to grant wishes. After passing through the hands of his schoolmates Loogie and Nose (Gagnon and Short), the town is awash in walking crocodiles and giant boogers. And Helvetica is about to get her hands on it.

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Bart Got A Room Review


Excellent
High school coming-of-age films have recently been overflowing movie screens like stuffed toilets. They can be hard-edged and true like Adventureland. Or raunchy yet soft and fuzzy like Superbad. Or they can be totally wacky, as is the case with Brian Hecker's Bart Got a Room.

Hecker's rite-of-passage romp, about a high school senior and resident twerp who strings out getting a prom date until the last second, takes place in an over-baked retirement community in Florida where the youngsters look like sprites among the old-folks majority. Hecker's take on the plastic, ready-to-go community is a nutty cartoonish style, taking its influence from Frank Tashlin -- a place of consumer detritus baking, along with the residents, in the bright light of the leisure world.

Continue reading: Bart Got A Room Review

The Tale Of Despereaux Review


OK
The Tale of Despereaux began life as a children's book, and the animated film version does its best to reproduce the sounds of a storybook: The characters, especially the brave little titular mouse, are earnest rather than wisecracking, and Sigourney Weaver speaks in soothing, empathetic tones as the narrator, just like mom. The movie might have looked a bit more like a lush picture book, though, if it had been hand-drawn rather than computer-generated.

Computers are now the default tools of the animation world, of course, and animators have produced many stunning and even personal images using them. But the animation in Despereaux is hardly state-of-the-art, and so in exchange for that token modernity we get the same waxy, deformed humans a computer could've struggled with in the late nineties. The mammals fare a bit better, but the movie's limited charm comes from its old-fashioned, homespun quality, not CGI breeze rustling through tiny CGI mouse hairs.

Continue reading: The Tale Of Despereaux Review

He Was A Quiet Man Review


Good
Nice guy. Quiet. Kept to himself.

Mass murderers often generate a typical refrain about their "quietness," but no one says such a thing in the middle of their invariably bloody rampages. Here, Christian Slater is aptly cast as a wallflower who's burning with rage on the inside. The catch is that when the appointed hour for Bob Maconel's cubicle killing spree to begin arrives, he's beaten to the punch by another guy who's already killed off half the office. In a split-second, though, Bob chooses to use his own handgun to off the killer, sparing the life of the one girl, Vanessa (Elisha Cuthbert), whom he'd planned to spare.

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Serial Review


Extraordinary
Martin Mull is a little-remembered comedian of the '70s and '80s, best known for TV's Fernwood 2-Night and the HBO series The History of White People in America (with collaborator Fred Willard, since then a fixture in Christopher Guest movies). Mull achieved greatness only with Serial, an underrated mainstream comedy with moments of Albert Brooks-like social satire.

Based on a novel by Cyra McFadden about the wacky California hot-tub culture of the late '70s, Serial expanded on the novel's Marin County setting to skewer the entire decadent nation. Mull plays a working stiff whose wife (Tuesday Weld, in an excellent performance) leaves him to find herself. His teenage daughter joins a cult, and Mull tries to adapt to a single lifestyle while wanting his family back. The supporting characters include a psychologist (Peter Bonerz) who encourages Mull's best friend to drown himself in the Bay to achieve oneness with the universe, and Tom Smothers as a hippie priest who begins a wedding by apologizing for being part of a society that "kills whales."

Continue reading: Serial Review

Wild Hogs Review


Good
Prior to my screening of Wild Hogs, the theatre played an advertisement in which two identical cars "sumo fight" on an elevated circular stage. Each car is distinguished by its performance. One charges forth, its engines roaring healthily, its nose forcing the other back. This other, its engine squealing pathetically, submits to the force of its opponent until eventually plummeting from the edge of the stage. The difference between the two cars? The first was running on superior fuel.

This car reminds me of Wild Hogs. Ostensibly, Wild Hogs is the same model as every other middle-of-the-road road movie; a hybrid vehicle that mishmashes middle-age crisis comedy with fish-out-of-water, city-slicker slapstick. However, its charismatic and effortless cast, and the occasional bit of wit, see that it performs better than the usual Hollywood dross regularly offered up as comedy. Hence its box office success.

Continue reading: Wild Hogs Review

Everyone's Hero Review


Bad
As I've said before, I have one rule for reviewing a kids' movie: Does it offer anything for adults who may be watching? Stale jokes, a soundtrack of songs that sounds like a combination of Creed's greatest hits and a sack of sugar, and the vocal talents of Rob Reiner will make adults dread seeing Everyone's Hero. And even though I pay taxes and have a pension plan, I'm fairly certain kids won't have much fun either.

The animated feature focuses on Yankee Irving, a Depression-era kid who embarks on a trip from New York to Chicago to return Babe Ruth's lucky bat and to clear his dad's name. Following Yankee is a crooked pitcher (voiced with gleeful malice by William H. Macy) who wants the bat so his team can hold Babe hitless and win the World Series.

Continue reading: Everyone's Hero Review

Maude: Season One Review


Very Good
One of the most controversial sitcoms of its era and still one of the most memorable for its strident political viewpoints, Maude probably never would have gotten on the air at all had it not been for its lineage. As the first spinoff of All in the Family and a pet project of Norman Lear, the king of TV comedy at the time, CBS had to give it a go, even if it wasn't sure what it was in for.

At a time when Vietnam still burned, Roe vs. Wade and the Equal Rights Amendment were in the headlines every day, and Watergate was warming up, Bea Arthur's unforgettable Maude Findlay, a harridan for the ages, became TV's most outspoken liberal voice, pleasing the left wing with her positions even as Archie Bunker was pleasing that same audience by demonstrating how distasteful right wingers could be. (It's amusing to imagine what Bill O'Reilly would say if Maude hit the airwaves today.)

Continue reading: Maude: Season One Review

A Slight Case Of Murder (1999) Review


Excellent
TNT continues to prove itself as a powerhouse of made-for-TV filmmaking. This modern noir, with Macy as a put-upon film critic who accidentally kills one of his girlfriends and tries to cover it up, is relentlessly entertaining. I could do without the commercials every eight minutes, though. William H. Macy co-wrote the script.

Everyone's Hero Review


Bad
As I've said before, I have one rule for reviewing a kids' movie: Does it offer anything for adults who may be watching? Stale jokes, a soundtrack of songs that sounds like a combination of Creed's greatest hits and a sack of sugar, and the vocal talents of Rob Reiner will make adults dread seeing Everyone's Hero. And even though I pay taxes and have a pension plan, I'm fairly certain kids won't have much fun either.

The animated feature focuses on Yankee Irving, a Depression-era kid who embarks on a trip from New York to Chicago to return Babe Ruth's lucky bat and to clear his dad's name. Following Yankee is a crooked pitcher (voiced with gleeful malice by William H. Macy) who wants the bat so his team can hold Babe hitless and win the World Series.

Continue reading: Everyone's Hero Review

Edmond Review


Weak
There's a slight chance, very slight, that David Mamet is a genius. As a writer, his blunt, edgy, and constantly interrupted dialogue has earned him a lot of weight, so much so that he is considered one of the more important playwrights of the last 25 years or so. As a director, he is precise and extremely-well calculated, if not a bit lacking in aesthetic substance and style. When he directs his own work, it tends to go remarkably smooth, as it did in the fantastic Heist and his best film, State and Main. However, when put in the hands of others, sometimes it goes exceedingly well (James Foster's Glengarry Glen Ross) or exceedingly bad (Michael Corrente's American Buffalo). The latest is a retelling of his play Edmond by King of the Ants helmer Stuart Gordon.On his way home from work, Edmond Burke (William H. Macy) decides to stop at a fortune teller. She simply tells him this: "You are not where you're supposed to be." This causes him to leave his wife (a brief Rebecca Pidgeon) and to go out on the town to get an old fashioned piece of tail, as suggested by a stranger at a bar (the reputable Joe Mantegna). He goes through strippers, booth girls and expensive call girls, played by a who's who of young actresses ranging from Mena Suvari to Denise Richards. He finally settles on a waitress (Julia Stiles) who he picks up after attacking a pimp and finding a newfound love for life. This passion, however, leads to a terrible act that lands him in jail and doing things that he was scared of before, constantly saying "every fear hides a wish."Mamet's sly style of writing somehow seems lacking here. In Glengarry, he wrote with blood and thunder about the rigorous work of real estate salesmen and in Oleanna, he split the sexual harassment debate so thinly that you couldn't see his opinion without microscope eyes. With Edmond however, he lays everything out for the audience and world to see, allowing the character to often pontificate on basic musings like what it's like to feel alive and the mundane nature of normal life. There is a serious lack of subtext that gives off the feeling of extreme annoyance.Gordon directs with a simple enough structuralism and he gives impressive terror to the climactic scene where Edmond goes over the edge. However, this simplicity also leads to a considerable loss in mood and atmosphere, which seems devoid after the excellent opening scene in the fortune teller's room. The actors, chiefly Macy and Stiles, struggle to keep the story afloat and exciting, but it's a losing battle. Reliable character actors like Bai Ling and Dylan Walsh (so good in Nip/Tuck) are given scant screen time to show their prowess, but Bokeem Woodbine works wonders as Edmond's bunkmate when he enters prison. None of this, however, allows Edmond to make more than a small ripple in the water. It's a fussy little movie that wants to be much more controversial and important than it is. Did I say those chances were very, very slight?The dead hooker's under the card in the middle.

Jurassic Park III Review


Excellent

Dinosaurs!

While the first Jurassic Park was mediocre and the second film god-awful, Jurassic Park III finally gets the formula right. These movies were never meant to be science heavy or overly sentimental; they should've been what #3 is -- an amusement park thrill ride packed wall-to-wall with dinosaurs and more dinosaurs, clocking in at less than 90 minutes with as little dialogue and subplot as possible. Plus, big bonus -- no Jeff Goldblum!

Instead of Goldblum, JP3 brings back Sam Neill as the slightly grizzled Dr. Alan Grant who seems happy to put his terrifying up-close dino experiences behind him. Grant and his new protégé Billy (Alessandro Nivola) are once again looking for funding for their research, and are coaxed into accompanying a new wealthy benefactor -- Paul Kirby (William H. Macy) and his wife Amanda (Téa Leoni) -- on a fly-over of the second Jurassic island, Isla Sorna. But things turn ugly when the Kirbys announce they plan to land on the island to search for their 14-year-old son Eric (Trevor Morgan) who was conveniently lost there while paragliding. When the group ends up crash landing in the jungle, the movie becomes a race to see who will get off the island and who will become lunch. (Sounds like a cool idea for the next Survivor.)

While dialogue has never been these films' strongest suit, JP3 remedies this by having less of it. Regardless, the writers behind this screenplay-of-fewer-words are pretty impressive: Alexander Payne and Jim Taylor are the minds behind Citizen Ruth and Election. It comes off as a bit like how a dumb movie turns out when it's penned by smart people (like a Wayne's World) -- lots of action peppered with throw-away goofball lines like, "They weren't making dinosaurs; they were playing God."

As evidenced by dialogue like that, JP3 doesn't take itself too seriously, which is perhaps its saving grace; and it pulls no punches when taking potshots at the other two movies. For example, when Grant finds Eric (or, rather, after Eric rescues Grant), Eric tells the scientist, "I've read both your books. I liked the first one better than the second." Also, the so-called millionaire Kirby turns out to be a plumber. So much for a repeat of John Hammond.

Above all, JP3 packs in more dinosaurs per square inch than any other JP film before it. This time, big, angry reptiles are coming out of the sky and water as well as land, and the filmmakers even introduce a dino to rival the T. Rex, a massive monster called Spinosaur (that's right, dino-fighting). And, of course, the raptors are back, and now they can communicate with each other (don't ask, evolution's a bitch). Most importantly, none of the humans try to fight the dinosaurs themselves, so we won't be seeing any unbelievable scenes of kids knocking out velociraptors with a few gymnastics kicks.

Efficiently crammed with lots of thrills, Jurassic Park III may come off as a little bit like a big-budget B-movie, but you're not likely to have a better time at a blockbuster this summer. It's just loud, smash-and-crash monster movie fun at its finest.

The DVD extras focus on the film's special effects -- surprisingly, very little CGI, very many animatronic legs and jaws.

Continue reading: Jurassic Park III Review

My Favorite Year Review


Excellent
Here's a funny little number based, as it happens, on a night in the life of Errol Flynn, when he showed up drunk to appear on Sid Caesar's variety show. O'Toole plays a Flynn-esque swashbuckler, Bologna is faux Sid, and Linn-Baker (pre Perfect Strangers) is their go-between. Touching and altogether happy, this is an easy Favorite.

Seabiscuit Review


Extraordinary
Regular readers know (or are expected to know) that I enjoy only two sports: boxing and horse racing. Sadly, movies about these two subjects almost always suck, probably having something to do with the fact that most of boxing's competitors are egomaniacal sociopaths and that the typical horse race lasts for only two minutes.

And so we come to Seabiscuit, the true story of a small, unruly race horse of great breeding but poor disposition who found himself sold for scrap. Despite his attitude, he eventually became one of the greatest racers in history. (Believe it or not there's already been one Seabiscuit-inspired movie... the first one starring Shirley Temple.)

Continue reading: Seabiscuit Review

Cellular Review


Good
When my cell phone rings, before I answer, I always check to see who's calling. If I don't know who it is, I'll likely not accept the call. With airtime at a premium and overage charges through the roof, it just makes good sense. It's also the reason why cell phones include caller ID! But in Cellular, when a random call is accepted, it sets forth a series of events that takes one man on an incredible journey across Los Angeles to save the caller on the other line.

The man is Ryan (Chris Evans), and according to his former girlfriend Chloe (Jessica Biel), he's just an irresponsible and self-centered beach bum - not exactly the person you'd want on the line if your life depended on it. The random call comes from Jessica Martin (Kim Basinger), a science teacher and mother who's been kidnapped from her Brentwood mansion and is being held hostage in the attic of an abandoned house. While in captivity, a desperate Jessica is miraculously able to splice together some wires from a telephone that is smashed to pieces by her abductor (Jason Statham). Somehow, her resulting call reaches Ryan.

Continue reading: Cellular Review

Pleasantville Review


Extraordinary
Not only does Pleasantville have more CGI effects than Titanic, it has more plot, better characters, and a more satisfying ending, too. Will it create the same kind of waves that the big boat did a year ago? Hardly, but discerning viewers not overcome by hype (see also The Truman Show) will probably agree with me that Pleasantvilleis truly one of the best films of the year.

Whereas Truman brought TV to a man's life, Pleasantvillebrings two teenagers to a TV show. Hasn't this been done? Well, yes, in a real stinker called Stay Tuned (1992, with John Ritter and Pam Dawber), but hopefully the dismal idiocy of that film won't color (so to speak) your judgement on this one. The plot really can't be condensed into a "TV Guide"-style logline, which means it requires a little thought to get into, but that really only enhances the moviegoing experience.

Continue reading: Pleasantville Review

Happy, Texas Review


Good
Since few people saw Drop Dead Gorgeous, Happy, Texas will likely not be remembered as the second beauty pageant comedy of 1999.

The lighthearted story of two convicted felons who break out of jail and find themselves impersonating a pair of gay pageant producers in the sleepy town of Happy, Texas, this film has a lot riding on what amounts to a one-joke concept.

Continue reading: Happy, Texas Review

Fargo Review


Essential
The Coen brothers are back and in a big way. Bigger, as a matter of fact, than ever before, because with Fargo, the Coens have produced a masterpiece of a film that outclasses anything they've done yet--from Raising Arizona to Barton Fink to even Blood Simple, the movie that put them on the map. Fargo is perhaps the best movie to come down the pike since Pulp Fiction--so good that it earns my seldom-awarded five-star rating.

Fargo is one of those rare pictures about which I have nothing negative to say. Based on an allegedly true story (since debunked as fiction) that took place in North Dakota/Minnesota in 1987, Fargo is the instantly enthralling tale of the financially-troubled Jerry Lundergaard (William H. Macy), a plan to kidnap his wife (Kristin Rudrud), her wealthy father (Harve Presnell), the halfway-competent criminals who screw everything up (Steve Buscemi and Peter Stormare), and the pregnant cop who's on the case (Frances McDormand).

Continue reading: Fargo Review

A Civil Action Review


Very Good
The best actor nominees for the 1998 Academy Awards will probably be Jim Carrey, Tom Hanks, Ian McKellan, Nick Nolte and a wild card. Edward Norton or Jeff Bridges should fill this wild card (for American History X and The Big Lebowski) but that won't happen. Instead, take a look at John Travolta in A Civil Action.

Travolta plays personal injury lawyer Jan Schlichtmann, a greedy bloodsucker of a lawyer (not a new concept but still a fun one) who in his first scene is heard talking about which is better, a dead black or a dead white. A dead cripple or a dead child? He gives that voice over with such a subtle coldness that you know you're in for a good story.

Continue reading: A Civil Action Review

Oleanna Review


Excellent
Filmmakers rarely tackle sensitive, controversial subjects. Most of the projects that get kudos (and Oscars) for taking on tough issues are obvious attempts to exploit controversies that have been settled, and in which the politically-correct opinion has pretty much won the day, like the liability of tobacco companies (The Insider).

This is not true, however, of David Mamet's Oleanna, which fearlessly addressed the issues of sexual harassment with the subtlety of a slap in the face. Oleanna was first a play that made theater audiences upset and angry before it became a movie that died at the box office, probably killed by its political content. Opinions have differed about the play/film's effectiveness. This reviewer felt that the film tried a little too hard to make the audience squirm -- but it also forced me to think.

Continue reading: Oleanna Review

Air Force One Review


Excellent
When one sees Glenn Close portraying the vice-president, one begins to realize just how much she looks (and can act) like Gerald Ford.

Frankly, I was shocked to discover how much I liked Air Force One. Yes, it has villainous Russians who can never see our good guy President (Harrison Ford) when he's hiding right in front of them (much less shoot him). Yes, it has Secret Service guys who die at the hand of the enemy like flies in a bug zapper. Yes, it has the cheesiest special effects this side of of a Tom & Jerry cartoon. Yes, it features a rambling Gary Oldman in one of his clearly improvised looney-tune terrorist/psychopath roles. I could go on and on...

Continue reading: Air Force One Review

Sahara Review


Bad
Nearly 25 years ago, Paramount Pictures struck gold with a film about an archeologist-adventure seeker named Indiana Jones. His quest to unravel mysteries and conquer evil around the world remains one of the most thrilling stories of its kind. Based on the trailer, Sahara, with its treasure-hunting hero Dirk Pitt, would appear to embody many of its predecessor's markings. Yet, what's lurking behind all of Sahara's explosions, one-liners, and plotting enemies is a monotonous, unsatisfying trek through an endless desert that would even have Dr. Jones scrambling for a new crusade.

Matthew McConaughey plays Dirk, the carefree leader of an exploration team working to recover lost artifacts from the ocean floor off the coast of Western Africa. Dirk is infatuated with the story of a captain from an ironclad American Civil War battleship who owned the last known U.S. gold dollar. As luck would have it, this ship just so happened to journey from Virginia to the nearby nation of Mali after the war. With the permission of his boss Admiral James Sandecker (William H. Macy), Dirk and his team, including his wiseass sidekick Al Giordino (Steve Zahn), are given three days to search the Niger River for the ship and the lost gold coin.

Continue reading: Sahara Review

State And Main Review


Extraordinary
In order to see one of 2000's real treasures, most of you are going to have to wait until January of 2001, when the masterful State and Main comes to a theater near you.

State and Main, written and directed by David Mamet (The Spanish Prisoner, The Winslow Boy, House of Games), follows a Hollywood film crew into the sleepy town of Waterford, Vermont, for the shooting of a would-be blockbuster. William H. Macy plays the director -- part ballbuster, part smooth-talker -- who comes to Waterford after the production kicked out of another lost-in-the-past New England locale.

Continue reading: State And Main Review

William H Macy

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William H Macy

Date of birth

13th March, 1950

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male




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William H Macy Movies

Blood Father Movie Review

Blood Father Movie Review

It's been four years since Mel Gibson played a lead role in a movie, and...

Blood Father Trailer

Blood Father Trailer

John Link hasn't been the best father, up until recently he's constantly been on the...

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Room Movie Review

Room Movie Review

One of the most extraordinary films of the year, this drama cleverly weaves in events...

Room Trailer

Room Trailer

A young woman and her 5-year-old son Jack live together in a confined, sound-proofed room...

Walter Movie Review

Walter Movie Review

The shift from bright comedy to rather grim drama is gradual enough to carry the...

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Cake Movie Review

Cake Movie Review

Jennifer Aniston delivers an Oscar-calibre performance in this rather over-worked drama, which tries to emphasise...

Cake Trailer

Cake Trailer

Claire Bennett is struggling to get through day-to-day life despite her buffet of pills, one-on-one...

The Wind Rises Movie Review

The Wind Rises Movie Review

For what he has said will be his final film, animation maestro Hayao Miyazaki tackles...

The Wind Rises Trailer

The Wind Rises Trailer

Jiro Horikoshi is an aeronautical engineer whose childhood was filled with dreams about becoming a...

The Wind Rises Trailer

The Wind Rises Trailer

When Jiro Horikoshi was a young boy, all he ever dreamed about was flying planes...

The Sessions Movie Review

The Sessions Movie Review

By taking a sensitive, honest approach to this true story, breakthrough filmmaker Lewin both avoids...

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