William Forsythe

William Forsythe

William Forsythe Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film RSS

Treat Williams, William Forsythe, James Woods and Robert De Niro - 52nd New York Film Festival - 'Once Upon a Time in America' Extended Director's Cut Collector's Edition - Premiere - Manhattan, New York, United States - Saturday 27th September 2014

Treat Williams, William Forsythe, James Woods and Robert De Niro
Treat Williams
Treat Williams
Treat Williams and Robert De Niro
Treat Williams and Robert De Niro
Treat Williams, William Forsythe, James Woods and Robert De Niro

William Forsythe Monday 23rd July 2012 Fox All-Star party held at Soho House - Arrivals

William Forsythe
William Forsythe
William Forsythe

William Forsythe Monday 14th May 2012 2012 Fox Upfront Presentation held at the Wollman Rink - Arrivals

William Forsythe
William Forsythe
William Forsythe
William Forsythe

William Forsythe Sunday 29th August 2010 FanExpo autograph session at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre. Toronto, Canada

William Forsythe

William Forsythe, Lynn Eastman-Rossi, Skip Deneberg, Tony Luke and Leo Rossi - William Forsythe, Lynn Eastman-Rossi, Skip Deneberg, Tony Luke and Leo Rossi Philadelphia, USA - World premiere of 'The Nail: The Story of Joey Nardone' at the Philadelphia Film Festival Friday 27th March 2009

William Forsythe, Lynn Eastman-rossi, Skip Deneberg, Tony Luke and Leo Rossi
William Forsythe
Leo Rossi, Lynn Eastman-rossi, William Forsythe, Tony Luke, James Quattrochi and Jason Noto
William Forsythe, Tony Luke Jr and Leo Rossi

City By The Seatest Review


Excellent
Relationships between fathers and sons must be the "in" topic for Hollywood. Road to Perdition was a moving story about the sacrifices made by generations of mob fathers to provide for their boys. Similar relationships are presented in City by the Sea; however, this film explores the opposite phenomenon. In City by the Sea, the lack of sacrifice by two generations of fathers has lasting repercussions on their children.

City by the Sea is inspired by the true events surrounding the life of New York City Homicide Detective Vincent LaMarca. A veteran of the police force, LaMarca (Robert De Niro) returns to the boardwalks of Long Beach, Long Island (a.k.a. City by the Sea), where he grew up, to investigate a homicide that his son Joey (James Franco) is under suspicion of committing. Vincent and Joey have been estranged since Vincent divorced his wife (Patti LuPone) 14 years ago. As a result, Joey has fallen into the pitfalls of drugs and vagrancy. When a drug deal goes bad, and Joey kills the dealer in the ensuing struggle, he becomes the target of many overzealous police officers who want to charge him with the crime. Joey is also the target for another drug dealer (William Forsythe) who wants the drug money he thinks Joey stole.

Continue reading: City By The Seatest Review

Jam Review


Good
I have to give director Craig Serling some credit. Setting Jam where it is -- on a narrow road blocked by a car wreck and a downed power line -- takes balls. Ensemble dramas like this are legion, but suggesting that people will just hang out for 90 minutes (our time, anyway) and re-evaluate their lives while they wait for the cops to clear the way is either genius or insane.

As with many ensemble flicks, Jam has some good stories and some bad, some good actors and some poor ones. There's a couple dealing with overwork and considering whether to have a baby, a woman on the way to her wedding, and a lesbian couple, one of whom is nine months pregnant. One vehicle is stolen, and at least one angst-ridden teen can be found in the mix. In fact, everyone is pretty angry... though no one seems to overly mind being stuck on the road for hours on end.

Continue reading: Jam Review

Once Upon A Time In America Review


OK
I'm as big a fan of misogyny as the next guy, but how did this hateful and often tasteless Godfather ripoff become a classic? What, just because it's four hours long? Robert De Niro and James Woods are never hard to watch, but even here their take on Jewish gangsters in New York from 1900 to 1960 or so wears awfully thin as they brutalize one woman after another and get into the kind of mobster scrapes you've seen in upteen other movies. And after the top names, the talent roster is pretty thin. Treat Williams? Elizabeth McGovern?

Continue reading: Once Upon A Time In America Review

The L.A. Riot Spectacular Review


Weak
A film that works overtime to offend each and every ethnic group and economic class that makes up the smoggy purgatory of Los Angeles while simultaneously patting itself on the back for being so putatively daring, The L.A. Riot Spectacular is a cynical exercise in erstwhile satire that's all the more frustrating for the wasted opportunity it represents.

Like a series of linked MAD TV skits done without regard to network censors - the humor is about that intelligent - the film presents the 1992 Rodney King beating and subsequent riots as a grand comic opera of greed and stupidity, going after everybody involved with equal vigor. One can get a feel for how writer/director Marc Klasfeld intends to approach his subject a few minutes in, when the car chase and police beating of King (T.K. Carter) is done as a jokey game, with a police helicopter pilot serving as the announcer ("and they're off!"), while the cops themselves, having pulled King over, place beats over the ethnicity of the guy inside. Then Snoop Dogg shows up - serving, appropriately enough, as the film's narrator and chorus - to introduce the film proper, while fireworks go off behind him.

Continue reading: The L.A. Riot Spectacular Review

Freedomland Review


Very Good
Unless you've burned through Richard Price's 1998 novel Freedomland, it's tough to pinpoint which direction this taut adaptation is headed. What starts as a routine police investigation erupts into a race riot before collapsing into a chilling portrait of a deranged killer.

Price accepted the challenge of converting his own novel into a shootable screenplay, which is good news. He retains the suspense and social commentary that strengthened his book. Sony then turned the script over to Joe Roth, which should terrify anyone who sat through the director's dippy America's Sweethearts or foul Christmas with the Kranks. Fear not, for Roth lets slip a gritty side as he allows Price to guide us through some darkened passages, literally and figuratively.

Continue reading: Freedomland Review

The Devil's Rejects Review


Excellent
House of 1000 Corpses, the last song on Rob Zombie's 2001 album The Sinister Urge, also served as the title track to the metal frontman-turned-filmmaker's 2003 directorial debut, but the cut's country twang-inflected ghoulishness would have made a more apt musical accompaniment for Zombie's The Devil's Rejects. Less a sequel than a spiritual follow-up, the director's latest revisits House's serial-killing Firefly clan as they're cast into the backwater dustbowls of rural America by a sheriff (William Forsythe) intent on exacting vigilante revenge for the murder of his brother. A gritty Western-via-grindhouse modern exploitation flick imbued with the ferocity of independent '70s horror, Zombie's splatterfest wisely alters virtually everything (narratively, stylistically, thematically) that characterized his campy, cartoonish and awkward first film. And from its coarse, graphic visual aesthetic, profusion of classic Southern rock tunes, and portrait of unrepentant mayhem, his film reverentially exults in the deranged spirit and impulsive, unpredictable energy of seminal genre masterpieces The Texas Chain Saw Massacre and The Hills Have Eyes.

The Devil's Rejects diverges from its predecessor beginning with its opening frames, in which the depiction of the Firefly residence - no longer a remote, forest-shrouded funhouse of horrors but, rather, a dilapidated structure situated in a stretch of open land - speaks to the film's rejection of atmospheric claustrophobia in favor of wide-open anarchy. A fascination with rampant disorder certainly fuels the tour de force intro sequence, a bullet-strewn siege on the Firefly home by Sheriff Wydell (Forsythe) and an army of police officers heightened by Zombie's sly use of freeze frames, Sergio Leone-esque close-ups, and The Allman Brothers' "Midnight Rider." Exhibiting a directorial maturity devoid of his former MTV-ish gimmickry (no hyper-edited montages with varying film stocks or bludgeoning industrial heavy metal here), the director orchestrates the chaotic events with feverish abandon, his shaky handheld camera set-ups and scraggly, sun-bleached cinematography (courtesy of Phil Parmet) placing us directly inside the carnage. By the time murderous siblings Otis (Bill Moseley) and Baby (Sheri Moon) escape their now overrun home to seek shelter in the rotting, blindingly white desert, Zombie has demonstrated a newfound adeptness at lacing nasty action with a breakneck thrust and vicious wit.

Continue reading: The Devil's Rejects Review

Hell's Kitchen Review


Bad
Quite awful melodrama has mother and daughter (Arquette and Jolie respectively) sleeping with the same guy, a heist-gone-wrong that leaves Jolie's brother dead, and a prison parolee hoping to become a boxing contender. Try to put the plots together and you get, well, a huge mess. As unwatchable as any movie that would try to name itself Hell's Kitchen ought to be; for Angelina Jolie superfans only.

The Rock Review


Excellent
Long touted as the low-budget (in action movie terms) alternative to this summer's Hollywood blockbusters, The Rock has been something of a question mark among movie forecasters. It doesn't have any real special effects like Twister or Independence Day. It doesn't build on a 40 year-old history like Mission: Impossible. It doesn't even have any big name action stars.

What it does have is some of the best actors working in film today (Nicolas Cage, Sean Connery, and Ed Harris), seasoned producers Jerry Bruckheimer and the late Don Simpson (Top Gun, for starters), Bad Boys director Michael Bay, and some relatively unknown screenwriters (David Weisberg, Douglas S. Cook, and Mark Rosner), who all pull together to tell one hell of a story -- and hands-down the best action flick of the year-to-date.

Continue reading: The Rock Review

Once Upon A Time In America Review


OK
I'm as big a fan of misogyny as the next guy, but how did this hateful and often tasteless Godfather ripoff become a classic? What, just because it's four hours long? Robert De Niro and James Woods are never hard to watch, but even here their take on Jewish gangsters in New York from 1900 to 1960 or so wears awfully thin as they brutalize one woman after another and get into the kind of mobster scrapes you've seen in upteen other movies. And after the top names, the talent roster is pretty thin. Treat Williams? Elizabeth McGovern?

Continue reading: Once Upon A Time In America Review

Blue Streak Review


OK

There seems to be an unwritten rule that movies starring ex-stand-up comedians must come to a grinding halt at some point for the star to have a vanity improv scene.

Every Robin Williams has such moments -- even his syrupy, sentimental pictures. Every Martin Lawrence movie does too. In "Blue Streak," the improv moment comes when Lawrence dons a nappy pigtails wig, gnarly false teeth, body padding and a velour jogging suit to pose as a hyperactive pizza delivery boy.

For that one scene, any common sense regarding the story is put on pause and Lawrence cuts loose with an epileptic booty bump dance and a lot of babbling smack, all of which is designed to produce seat-bouncing laughs (it doesn't), but has little to do with the movie.

Continue reading: Blue Streak Review

William Forsythe

William Forsythe Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Actor


Suggested

Ed Sheeran, Stormzy And Alt-J Lead 2017 Mercury Prize Shortlist

Ed Sheeran, Stormzy And Alt-J Lead 2017 Mercury Prize Shortlist

This year's Mercury Prize nominees features the best of British pop.

Advertisement
Leopallooza 2017 - Festival Preview

Leopallooza 2017 - Festival Preview

Situated in a scenic Cornish valley, the eleventh iteration of the Leopallooza Festival takes place near Bude in Cornwall from July 28th to July 30th.

Olly Alexander's Happy Place Is Inside His Head

Olly Alexander's Happy Place Is Inside His Head

Olly Alexander's happy places is inside his head.

Linkin Park Back In Charts After Chester Death

Linkin Park Back In Charts After Chester Death

Linkin Park have returned to America's Billboard Chart following the tragic suicide of their frontman Chester Bennington last week.

Advertisement

William Forsythe Movies

Freedom Land Trailer

Freedom Land Trailer

Revolution Studios' powerful drama Freedomland is a highly charged and gritty mystery of a carjacking,...

Freedomland Movie Review

Freedomland Movie Review

Unless you've burned through Richard Price's 1998 novel Freedomland, it's tough to pinpoint which direction...

Advertisement
Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo Movie Review

Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo Movie Review

When the lights go down--the manwhore comes out to play.When I watch certain actors paint...

Advertisement
Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.