Walter Koenig

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Star Trek: Renegades' Premiere

Walter Koenig , Nichelle Nichols - Star Trek: Renegades' premiere at the Crest Westwood - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 2nd August 2015

Walter Koenig and Nichelle Nichols
Walter Koenig and Nichelle Nichols
Walter Koenig
Walter Koenig
Walter Koenig and Nichelle Nichols

Celebrities Pose For Photographers, Without British Actor Patrick Stewart After He Refused To Take Part In A Photocall For 'Destination Star Trek London' At The ExCel Centre

Walter Koenig Friday 19th October 2012 Celebrities pose for photographers, without British actor Patrick Stewart after he refused to take part in a photocall for 'Destination Star Trek London' at the ExCel Centre

Walter Koenig

Walter Koenig Lands Hollywood Walk Of Fame Star


Leonard Nimoy George Takei Star Trek Walter Koenig

Leonard Nimoy and George Takei were among the Star Trek actors who saluted Walter Koenig on Monday (10Sep12) as he joined his former castmates in receiving an honour on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Koenig, who played Pavel Chekov in the hit 1960s sci-fi show, unveiled the 2,479th star on Hollywood Boulevard, close to Takei's pavement plaque.

He was joined by his former co-stars Takei, Nimoy and Nichelle Nichols, as well as his wife Judy Levitt and daughter Danielle, at the ceremony - and he was overwhelmed by the accolade.

Speaking of his star honour when it was announced last year (11), Koenig declared, "This is something that you hope and wish for, dream about, but something you never expect to really happen. It's a joyous occasion and I am deeply honoured."

Continue reading: Walter Koenig Lands Hollywood Walk Of Fame Star

At The Walter Koenig Honor With A Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame.

Walter Koenig - Judy Koenig, Walter Koenig, daughter Danielle Koenig, Monday 10th September 2012 at the Walter Koenig honor with a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Walter Koenig
Leonard Nimoy, George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, Walter Koenig and Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame
Leonard Nimoy, George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, Walter Koenig and Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame
Leonard Nimoy, George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, Walter Koenig and Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame
Leonard Nimoy, George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, Walter Koenig and Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame
Leonard Nimoy, George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, Walter Koenig and Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame

Walter Koenig To Become The Last Star Trek Original To Land Star Honour


Walter Koenig

Actor Walter Koenig is set to become the last member of the Star Trek Tv series to be honoured with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

The actor, who played Pavel Chekov in the hit sci-fi series, will unveil the 2,479th star on Hollywood Boulevard, close to pal and co-star George Takei's pavement plaque, on 10 September (12).

Koenig was one of the seven main cast members of the original Star Trek television series, which aired from 1966 to 1969.

A star-studded, two-day celebration is planned to kick off Koenig's star ceremony - a gala event will commence on 8 September to mark the 46th anniversary of Star Trek and the festivities will culminate with a grand banquet and roast at the Beverly Garland Hotel a day later.

Continue reading: Walter Koenig To Become The Last Star Trek Original To Land Star Honour

Koenig: 'Andrew Took His Own Life'


Star Trek Walter Koenig

Troubled ANDREW KOENIG committed suicide, according to his Star Trek actor dad Walter Koenig.

The body of the former Growing Pains star was found in Vancouver, Canada on Thursday afternoon (25Feb10).

He was last seen during a trip to the city on 14 February (10), and was reported missing by a friend after failing to show up for his flight home to Los Angeles two days later (16Feb10).

His parents issued an emotional plea to the 41 year old during a police press conference on Wednesday (24Feb10), when they begged Andrew to get in touch.

Continue reading: Koenig: 'Andrew Took His Own Life'

Koenig's Parents Issue Tearful Plea To Missing Actor


Star Trek Walter Koenig

Former Star Trek actor Walter Koenig has issued an emotional plea to his son ANDREW to get in touch after he went missing in Vancouver, Canada earlier this month (Feb10).

Police have launched an investigation into the disappearance of Andrew Koenig, who starred in 1980s TV sitcom Growing Pains, after he missed his flight home from Vancouver to Los Angeles on 16 February (10), the same day as his last known sighting. Detectives also claim his cell phone and bank card were last used on 16 February (10).

Local authorities have been combing the area for the 41 year old after receiving a number of reported sightings from locals on Vancouver Island.

His parents Walter and Judith Koenig flew into the city on Tuesday (23Feb10) to take part in a press conference at the Vancouver Police Department on Wednesday (24Feb10).

Continue reading: Koenig's Parents Issue Tearful Plea To Missing Actor

Star Trek: Season Three Review


Very Good
Everyone knows the sixties were a time of rapid social change, but just how rapid becomes obvious when re-watching the original Star Trek -- daring and original in some ways, retro in others. For better or worse, modern liberal idealism owes a lot to the naive, multi-ethnic utopian vision promulgated by Star Trek (and just like Starfleet's Prime Directive, liberal tolerance is honored mostly in the breach). And the first interracial kiss shown on TV was in season three. (Though it's not exactly an inspirational moment -- Captain Kirk and Lt. Uhura are forced to kiss by evil aliens.)

But the original Trek also drew heavily on Cold War-era sci-fi series like The Outer Limits and The Twilight Zone -- groundbreaking and experimental in their ideas, but with a traditional moral and dramatic approach. Their serious tone fit the fifties, that uneasy, schizoid time of cultural confidence, space exploration, and looming nuclear Armageddon. Star Trek's cautious presentation probably helped viewers to swallow its innovations, from flip-phone communicators and automatic doors to alien characters like Leonard Nimoy's Spock. The idea of a character motivated by "logic" instead of emotion is pretty silly (they're not opposites), but it was perfect for the liberationist sixties -- and it was a powerful gimmick that generated years' worth of story ideas. (In one of season three's last episodes, "All Our Yesterdays," Spock goes back in time, loses his civilized veneer, and develops a primordial passion for Mariette Hartley.)

Continue reading: Star Trek: Season Three Review

Star Trek: Season Three Review


Very Good
Everyone knows the sixties were a time of rapid social change, but just how rapid becomes obvious when re-watching the original Star Trek -- daring and original in some ways, retro in others. For better or worse, modern liberal idealism owes a lot to the naive, multi-ethnic utopian vision promulgated by Star Trek (and just like Starfleet's Prime Directive, liberal tolerance is honored mostly in the breach). And the first interracial kiss shown on TV was in season three. (Though it's not exactly an inspirational moment -- Captain Kirk and Lt. Uhura are forced to kiss by evil aliens.)

But the original Trek also drew heavily on Cold War-era sci-fi series like The Outer Limits and The Twilight Zone -- groundbreaking and experimental in their ideas, but with a traditional moral and dramatic approach. Their serious tone fit the fifties, that uneasy, schizoid time of cultural confidence, space exploration, and looming nuclear Armageddon. Star Trek's cautious presentation probably helped viewers to swallow its innovations, from flip-phone communicators and automatic doors to alien characters like Leonard Nimoy's Spock. The idea of a character motivated by "logic" instead of emotion is pretty silly (they're not opposites), but it was perfect for the liberationist sixties -- and it was a powerful gimmick that generated years' worth of story ideas. (In one of season three's last episodes, "All Our Yesterdays," Spock goes back in time, loses his civilized veneer, and develops a primordial passion for Mariette Hartley.)

Continue reading: Star Trek: Season Three Review

Koenig To Be Takei's Best Man


George Takei Star Trek Walter Koenig

Gay actor George Takei will wed his longtime partner in September (08) - and has chosen his Star Trek co-star Walter Koenig as his best man.


The 71-year-old star - known for his role as Sulu in the 1960s sci-fi series - will wed partner Brad Altman this summer (08), after California state authorities lifted the ban on same-sex marriage last month (15May08).


Takei will marry his partner of 20 years on 14 September (08) and has invited his former castmates to the ceremony.


He tells People.com, "The best man is my colleague from Star Trek, Walter Koenig, who played Chekov, and the matron of honour is Nichelle Nichols (Lt. Uhura). And Leonard (Nimoy) and his wife Susan are on the (guest) list."

Continue reading: Koenig To Be Takei's Best Man

Participating In Day Three Of 'The Big Apple Comic Book, Art, Toy & Sci-Fi Show' Held At The Penn Plaza Pavillion

Walter Koenig and Apple - Walter Koenig and Celeste Holm New York City, USA - participating in day three of 'The Big Apple Comic Book, Art, Toy & Sci-Fi Show' held at the Penn Plaza Pavillion Sunday 18th November 2007

Walter Koenig and Apple

'The Big Apple Comic Book, Art, Toy & Sci-fi Show' - Day One, Held At The Penn Plaza Pavillion.

Walter Koenig and Apple - Walter Koenig and Val Kilmer New York City, USA - 'The Big Apple comic book, art, toy & sci-fi show' - day one, held at the Penn Plaza Pavillion. Friday 16th November 2007

Walter Koenig and Apple
Walter Koenig and Apple

Trek Actor Calls On Fans To Campaign Against Atrocities


Star Trek Walter Koenig

Star Trek star Walter Koenig has urged the show's fans to campaign against Myanmar's military junta, branding it an "outpost of tyranny".
The 70-year-old actor, who played Commander Pavel Chekov in the hit show and several movies, is hoping for change after visiting a refugee camp on the Thai-Myanmar border recently.
He says, "I can tell people what I experienced, meeting people without limbs, the ex-political prisoners, the squalor, all that I have seen in these brief days."
And he believe the severity of the situation in the former Burma will resonate with the show's fans, adding, "Star Trek fans are very receptive to humanitarian causes. The stereotype is somebody who is into computers or sits at home and does nothing else.
"But there is an extraordinary sense of philanthropy and benevolence among people who watch a show in which there is a company of characters who embrace all ethnicities and all races.
"I think they would respond to real world circumstances as well and spread the word."

Star Trek: The Motion Picture Review


OK
The rule with Star Trek films is even-numbered films are good, odd-numbered are bad -- and the first film in the series is no exception. Star Trek: The Motion Picture was released at a time when sci-fi movies were expected to be long, sluggish, arty epics like Close Encounters of the Third Kind and Dune. To achieve the desired length and artiness, the producers of Star Trek: TMP hired director Robert Wise -- best known for overlong, dull classics like The Sound of Music -- and chose a script which was long on dialogue but short on action or character development. (Plot: Alien vessel is coming toward earth -- Kirk and co. must stop it. Zzzzzzz.)

Added to the mix is Persis Khambatta, a model-turned-actress who can't even act as well the veterans of the TV show, playing a bald female alien (a femalien). Finally, a third of the movie is wasted on special effects which do not compare favorably with other sci-fi movies (though see below for more on this). Draped over this mess is one of the best musical scores ever wasted on a movie, the work of Jerry Goldsmith (note that the main theme was salvaged and used for the Star Trek: The Next Generation TV show). All told, the movie is one of the few imitators of 2001: A Space Odyssey that achieves the same feeling of mystery and danger. Partly this is due to Goldsmith's excellent score; partly it is because the slow pacing and dark, gloomy sets succeed in conveying the slowness and suspense of space travel, as well as its emptiness.

Continue reading: Star Trek: The Motion Picture Review

Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home Review


Excellent
This is the one with the whales. That's right. The Romulans and Klingons are put aside for one episode in order to create an enemy from a faraway world, suggesting that humpback whales are not native to earth -- that they're an alien species that communicates with the whales of earth through some unknown method. When the space whales haven't heard from their earthbound pals (we're told they were driven to extinction centuries in the movie's past), they decide to pay a visit. The unintended consequence is the destruction of the power systems of everything in its path.

Solution: The Enterprise crew takes a trip back through time (in the stolen Klingon bird-of-prey from Star Trek III) to the 1980s (conveniently coinciding with the production time fram of the film) in order to snag a couple of whales and repopulate the future.

Continue reading: Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home Review

Walter Koenig

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Walter Koenig Movies

Star Trek: The Motion Picture Movie Review

Star Trek: The Motion Picture Movie Review

The rule with Star Trek films is even-numbered films are good, odd-numbered are bad --...

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