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Jeff Goldblum, Vivica A. Fox , Roland Emmerich - Roland Emmerich Hand and Footprint Ceremony held at the TCL Chinese Theatre at TCL Chinese Theatre - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 21st June 2016

Jeff Goldblum, Vivica A. Fox and Roland Emmerich
Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum

Vivica A. Fox - Roland Emmerich Handprint and Footprint Ceremony held at the TCL Chinese Theatre IMAX at TCL Chinese Theater IMAX - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 20th June 2016

Vivica A. Fox
Vivica A. Fox

Vivica A. Fox - Roland Emmerich Hand And Footprint Ceremony at TCL Chinese Theatre - Hollywood, California, United States - Monday 20th June 2016

Vivica A. Fox
Vivica A. Fox
Vivica A. Fox
Vivica A. Fox
John Storey, Jeff Goldblum, Vivica A. Fox, Roland Emmerich, Bill Pullman and Brent Spiner
John Storey, Jeff Goldblum, Vivica A. Fox, Roland Emmerich, Bill Pullman and Brent Spiner

Vivica A. Fox - Premiere of 20th Century Fox's 'Independence Day: Resurgence' - Arrivals at Hollywood - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 20th June 2016

Vivica A. Fox
Vivica A. Fox
Vivica A. Fox
Vivica A. Fox
Vivica A. Fox
Vivica A. Fox

Jessie Usher , Vivica A. Fox - Premiere of 'Independence Day: Resurgence' held at TCL Chinese Theatre - Outside Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 20th June 2016

Jessie Usher and Vivica A. Fox
Vivica A. Fox

Independence Day: Resurgence - Teaser Trailer


Everyone knows the tale of David Levinson and Captain Steven Hiller, the two men at the forefront of the last Alien invasion. Since that last fateful day, Levinson has worked tirelessly to protect the world and strengthen it from alien attacks, even using the technology they discovered on board the alien spaceship to counter their possible attack methods.

When the people of Earth learn that Aliens are on their way back to our planet, there's automatic hysteria and a hope that the newly installed space defences will help counter the attack. Whatever stringent plans David develops he, more than anyone, realises that it will probably not be enough to protect us.

Independence Day: Resurgence takes place twenty years after the original movie and sees many of the cast taking up the same role again. The film is directed by Roland Emmerich (known for The Day After Tomorrow, Godzilla and the first Independence Day movie.)

Vivica A Fox - Vivica A Fox leaving the Wendy Williams show - Manhattan, New York, United States - Tuesday 10th February 2015

Vivica A Fox
Vivica A Fox
Vivica A Fox
Vivica A Fox
Vivica A Fox
Vivica A Fox

Vivica A. Fox - Experience East meets West in honor of 100 years of Beverly Hills & Lunar New Year of the Horse in association with The An Family and Beverly Hills Chamber of Commerce, held at Crustacean Beverly Hills - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 5th February 2014

Vivica A. Fox
Vivica A. Fox
Vivica A. Fox

Video - 'After Earth' Stars Will Smith And Jaden Smith Snapped At The NY Premiere - Part 3


Will Smith and Jaden Smith were surrounded by friends and family on their arrival at the New York premiere for their movie 'After Earth' held at the Ziegfeld Theatre. They were joined by real-life astronaut Buzz Aldrin - globally renowned for being the second man to land on the moon with Neil Armstrong - and Haitian musician Wyclef Jean with Jean's wife Marie Claudinette and adopted daughter Angelina.

Continue: Video - 'After Earth' Stars Will Smith And Jaden Smith Snapped At The NY Premiere - Part 3

Vivica A Fox - Vivica A. Fox Hollywood, Los Angeles - The 80th Anniversary of The Hollywood Christmas Parade benefiting Marine Toys For Tots on Hollywood Boulevard - Outside Arrivals Sunday 27th November 2011

Vivica A Fox

The Slammin' Salmon Trailer


Watch the trailer for The Slammin' Salmon

When Cleon Salmon's career as a heavyweight boxer was over, he felt a new career in the catering trade would be a nice way to spend his years. The Slammin' Salmon is a high end seafood eatery in Miami, Cleon himself, manages his untrained oddball staff.

Continue: The Slammin' Salmon Trailer

Vivica A Fox - Vivica A. Fox Los Angeles, California - 2009 Fox Reality Channel Really Awards held at The Music Box - Arrivals Tuesday 13th October 2009

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Vivica A Fox

Vivica A Fox, David Phillips and Jefferson Brown - Vivica A. Fox, David Phillips, Jefferson Brown Los Angeles, California - Premiere of 'Shark City' at the Regent Showcase Theatre Thursday 19th March 2009

Vivica A Fox, David Phillips and Jefferson Brown
Vivica A Fox and Carlo Rota
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Vivica A Fox

Batman & Robin Review


Terrible
This fourth episode in the Batman series isn't a movie so much as a theme park. It wasn't scripted so much as run through the Hollywood script mill, where every line of dialogue is reduced to a catchphrase. "Allow me to break the ice," says Mr. Freeze (Arnold Schwarzenegger), "My name is Freeze. Learn it well. For it's the chilling sound of your doom." That groaner is representative of pretty much every line of Batman's arch-nemesis. He later posits such zingers as, "Tonight, hell freezes over!" and "You're not sending me to the cooler!" This is not character development so much as paint-by-numbers screenwriting, where you can imagine the gang sitting around wondering what incorrigible pun they'll come up with next.

Tim Burton's first two Batman films were all about this nerd auteur playing with a gigantic train set, so even though the stories were threadbare and superficial, at least Burton brought a highly stylized pop Gothic look. Jack Nicholson hammed it up nicely as the Joker and Michelle Pfeiffer's Catwoman was an unforgettably sexy femme fatale who was able to hold her own in a power struggle with the caped crusader. Say what you will, the films had their moments, and even miscast Michael Keaton was an enjoyable wild card.

Continue reading: Batman & Robin Review

Juwanna Mann Review


Bad
Hollywood's latest cross-dressing comedy comes from Warner Bros., a studio that up until now has been enjoying a successful summer run (Scooby-Doo, Insomnia, and Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood). Juwanna Mann -- best described as Tootsie in high tops -- should stop the studio's momentum dead in its tracks when it finally hits screens, as this bland, tiresome and uninspired farce has been sitting in the can awaiting distribution for almost two years, gathering mold and cobwebs when it should have been polishing jokes and shoring up plotlines.

Miguel A. Nunez Jr. stars as Jamal Jeffries, egotistical bad-boy of the UBA (apparently the NBA didn't want their brand associated with this Mann), who gets suspended from the Charlotte Beat for repeated examples of lewd behavior on and off the court. His agent (Kevin Pollak) quits on him, claiming no one will employ a hothead, regardless of his talent. Desperate to fuel his extravagant lifestyle, Jeffries dons a wig, some padding, and his aunt's best sneakers to create Juwanna Mann, a muscular two-guard who tries out for and makes the Beat's female counterpart, the WUBA Charlotte Banshees. Whether he/she can maintain the ruse all season lies at the heart of this limp comedy.

Continue reading: Juwanna Mann Review

Double Take Review


Terrible
New year, new pile of movies straight from the Hollywood dumping ground of badly test-screened, obscure, unfunny, and badly acted garbage. Double Take is the first pony out of the gate. I don't know which is the worst part of the film: Eddie Griffin's overacting, Orlando Jones' non-acting, or the ugly mutt that passes as Griffin's sidekick.

Orlando Jones does a better job in those 7-Up commercials than in the role of Darryl Chase, an uptight investment banker set up by a combination of the CIA, the FBI, a Mexican drug cartel, the Federales, and an emu farmer as part of a double murder/embezzlement scheme. Running from the law, Chase changes clothes and identity with Freddy Tiffany, a two-bit hustler named played by Eddie Griffin he encounters on the street. Together, the pair travel across the country to Mexico, where a certain CIA agent holds the key to Chase's freedom. And of course, during the journey, Darryl Chase rediscovers his roots as a black man while Freddy Tiffany shucks and jives his way through every situation like he's the bastard son of Eddie Murphy and Jerry Lewis.

Continue reading: Double Take Review

Two Can Play That Game Review


Excellent
Two Can Play That Game turns love into a brutal battleground of the sexes. It's not about relationships as much as it is about the "rules" they abide by (or don't abide by). A twisted version of Angela Bassett in How Stella Got Her Groove Back, Vivica A. Fox stars as a successful businesswoman named Shante Smith. She's a player, as she explains in the opening scenes, knowing as much as there is to know about the "rules" of love.

Shante has a bunch of friends, and a handsome, charming boyfriend named Keith Fenton (Morris Chestnut), a successful lawyer himself. One night, Shante finds her love dancing with another woman at a nightclub -- and so begins the vicious battles of the sexes. Will the two get back together, or will this be the end of their relationship?

Continue reading: Two Can Play That Game Review

Boat Trip Review


Terrible
Directors, screenwriters, and everyone else involved in making a movie have a singular task: make an audience believe in the world onscreen. I'll forgive a lot in a movie, if the characters and their conflicts hold my attention. Boat Trip never makes the effort to establish anything original. The filmmakers are selling you a used world at new world prices. In fact, their opinion of the audience's intelligence is borderline galling.

The plot is a shameless rip off of Some Like It Hot, modified for the Britney generation. Desperate for some female loving, two single guys (Cuba Gooding Jr. and Horatio Sanz) decide to go on a singles cruise. However, thanks to a malicious travel agent (Will Ferrell, smartly appearing unbilled) the two dolts unwillingly wind up on a gay cruise.

Continue reading: Boat Trip Review

Why Do Fools Fall In Love? Review


OK
Or, a better question: Why would anyone think a movie about a battle over music royalties by three vengeful women, starring Little Richard as himself, would be any good?

Kingdom Come Review


Good
When LL Cool J stars in a movie with a title like Kingdom Come, you expect to see car chases, stuff getting blown up, that sort of thing. Instead, we get a fairly average, seen-it-before, family comedy that has its moments as well as its problems -- just like the clan in the movie.

When the Slocumb family patriarch -- evidently an ornery sonofabitch -- keels over in front of wife Whoopi Goldberg, it sets off a Slocumb pilgrimage back to the tiny town of Lula for a weekend of last respects. But, like most extended families, there is friction, conflict, and the occasional secret.

Continue reading: Kingdom Come Review

Kill Bill: Volume 1 Review


Excellent

Editor's Note: Once in a while a film comes along that's so popular the critics start lining up months in advance, begging to review it. Kill Bill is a case in point, and Tarantino would do well to turn his camera at the gory battles among the filmcritic.com staffers, what with all the limbs and blood flying everywhere. But Bill has also become another source of strife: It's the most contentious film we've reviewed in a long while, with lovers and detractors lined up on either side of a wide DMZ. So in the spirit of the kung fu flick, which inspired Tarantino to make Bill in the first place, we present our own knock-down, drag-out battle to the death. Enjoy.

Sean O'Connell: "writes itself into the Hollywood history books"Quentin Tarantino's fourth film, Kill Bill, reminds us why we, as a collective moviegoing society, wish he'd work more often than he does. The acclaimed director rocketed to cult stardom with Reservoir Dogs and Pulp Fiction, cranked out an overlong homage to film noir in Jackie Brown, and then slid off the filmmaking radar for the better part of six years.

Well, he's back, serving as the director and screenwriter of a slight story built around a botched assassination and the ensuing desire for revenge. Plot-wise, Kill Bill couldn't be simpler. The execution, though, is so massive that Tarantino split the movie into two parts, which Miramax will release months apart from each other.

Tarantino may be receiving reams of press for his risky endeavor, but Bill's real star is Uma Thurman. She plays The Bride, a wispy blonde warrior left for dead by her former boss Bill (David Carradine). Four years later, she snaps out of a coma and swears vengeance on the fiends who shot her in the head. Tarantino asks the world of his leading lady, and Thurman delivers. She rolls her natural vulnerability and newfound butt-kicking passion into a steely ball of adrenaline. The right actress for this role, she effortlessly balances the physical demands of Bill with the lyrical demands of Tarantino's wordy dialogue.

All praise heaped on Tarantino's effort comes with a warning, though. Violent beyond comparison, Bill begs you to avert your eyes from the ceaseless bloodshed, and turns your stomach with its celebrated depiction of exaggerated brutality. The ear-slicing scene of Reservoir Dogs and the hypodermic needle sequence in Fiction still don't prepare you for the carnage Bill brings to the screen.

Yet for every one minute of time you spend revolted by Bill, you spend two minutes enamored with the risks Tarantino takes. An animated sequence only contributes to the onslaught, testing the boundaries of acceptable stylish slaughter. The lengthy fight sequence at The House of Blue Leaves writes itself into the Hollywood history books. Tarantino and legendary kung-fu fight choreographer Woo-ping Yuen repeatedly take Bill ten steps beyond the point of overkill. It's frequently elegant, but enough quickly becomes enough.

Right at the point you're ready to throw in the towel and write Bill off as a shameless gore fest, though, something occurs that pulls you right back into the fold. It could be Sonny Chiba's subtle performance as a samurai master selected to mentor The Bride. It might be Chiaki Kuriyama's deliciously deadly turn as a 17-year-old assassin dressed as a schoolgirl. More than likely, though, it's a visual trick conjured up by Tarantino's imaginative brain. Bill is gorgeous, but unwatchable. It's absorbing, then vile. With an ounce of restraint, Tarantino could've had a masterpiece on his hands. It certainly whets your appetite for Volume 2, though I'm thankful I've got until February to rest, wipe the blood off my face, and mentally prepare for another round.

RATING: [][][][]

Can you spear me now?

Jeremiah Kipp: "the epitome of soullessness"The Miramax hype machine was working overtime on Kill Bill, breaking Quentin Tarantino's epic pastiche of revenge into two volumes. Rather than serve this quasi-retro samurai saga in one three-hour heap, Kill Bill serves itself out in portions. Kill Bill reveals Tarantino as a sham auteur ripping off Hong Kong action flicks and 1970s B-movies for their surface frills. He's the cinematic equivalent of karaoke or bad photocopies, mindlessly adopting style while forgetting the basic precepts of storytelling.

The look of Kill Bill, courtesy of Oliver Stone's ace cinematographer Robert Richardson, neatly approximates the grimy drive-in quality of the Shaw brothers and whoever else Tarantino stumbled upon in the video store and the midnight showcase. But it only serves to highlight the vapidity of Kill Bill, a movie without characters and a plot in spin-cycle. Volume 1 offers us five out of the ten chapters detailing the revenge of a gung-ho assassin named The Bride (Uma Thurman). Her former teammates, led by Bill (David Carradine, mostly absent from Volume 1), attempt to blow her away at her wedding -- and kill all the wedding guests and her fiancée in the process. They fail, and when The Bride wakes up from her coma she's ready to kick some ass.

That's pretty much all you need to know about Kill Bill. The arbitrary chapters leap back and forth in time, and could be shuffled together in any order approximating the same thing: mindless, vapid slaughter. Chapter One: This bad angel swoops in to open up a can of whoop-ass on Los Angeles housewife/psycho killah Vernita Green (Viveca A. Fox). Before we've built up any interest or sympathies, The Bride and Vernita go mad-dog-crazy, smashing up furniture (and each other) in a domestic bloodbath.

Hold the phone for one moment. QT is getting a rise out of the slaughter, but there are at least five problems to be seen right off the bat. 1) He's replicating action scenes he's seen before, and working so hard at being cool (kittenish one-liners; been-there-done-that spin kicks; surprise gunshots) that you come to realize, you shouldn't have to work at being cool. 2) Vernita's four-year-old daughter wanders into the fray, and the two fighters politely stop and wait for her to go to her room. Its fake polite, and the child actor is directed so poorly it's as though she's an automaton. Mommy might get killed, but what's on TV? That's not just stupid -- it's simplistic. 3) Uma Thurman lacks the screen presence of a charged Charles Bronson or Bruce Lee; her aquiline nose and lanky body are better suited for modeling than dealing out death. 4) QT clearly gets off on girls fighting each other, but he lacks adult sensuality in favor of a teenager's drool. 5) The outcome of the match is inconsequential, since The Bride and Vernita are both presented as unsympathetic, detached, and cold blooded.

QT obviously learned nothing from the best scenes of Jackie Brown, which weren't the shootouts. They were the slow-developing relationship between screen icons Pam Grier and Robert Forster, who brought a warmth and humanity to QT's hipster-isms. That's drained bone dry in Kill Bill. Tarantino shows how much he's familiar with other movies, without crafting one of his own: The Bride drives around a gaudy car called the "Pussy Wagon"; villainess Lucy Liu slices off an enemy's head after delivering a lengthy monologue on mob etiquette; Liu's gang includes a Japanese schoolgirl minx. And at the end of the day, big deal! Tarantino assembles a list of his favorite things, and nearly breaks his arm patting himself on the back for it. His smugness infects every scene, and Kill Bill becomes a joyless joy ride through a fan boy's world. Who wants to see a movie made by Comic Book Guy from The Simpsons?

The epitome of soullessness is The Bride battling her way through Lucy Liu's gang in the already over-appreciated "House of Blue Leaves" sequence. Notorious? Hardly. It's a padded version of the Black Knight scene from Monty Python and the Holy Grail, with limbs and spurts of blood flying through the air as The Bride kills everybody. There's no recklessness to it. Everything's too prescribed, too self-aware, too cool, and therefore too aloof and detached to be actually, God forbid, fun. When Uma Thurman and Lucy Liu run through the "Silly rabbit, Trix are for kids!" dialogue from Saturday morning cartoon commercials, it's a meaningless bit of hipster jargon that has nothing to do with anything. That's infuriating, because Kill Bill says in that moment that it's about nothing other than posing. Will audiences care, and will they line up for more flotsam and jetsam in Kill Bill Volume 2?

Don't give Harvey Weinstein, Miramax, and Quentin Tarantino the satisfaction of ripping you off. They're charging you twice as much for an incomplete movie, a soulless riff, a hipster machine coasting on the tired fumes of Tarantino's former glory. Jack Black talks about The Man in The School of Rock, saying that we should fight The Man and reclaim our independence. Well, independent film in the form of Quentin, Harvey, Miramax and Kill Bill is The Man. Don't let them sucker you.

RATING: []

Aka Kill Bill: Vol. 1.

The DVD offers scant extras, including two live performances by The 5, 6, 7, 8s (the trio of Japanese girls that perform at the House of Blue Leaves) and the usual making-of documentary, wherein Uma Thurman promptly misinterprets the movie by telling us it's about redemption. (Sorry Uma, it's about revenge. "Redemption" is doing something good to atone for past sins, not killing a bunch of people out of spite.) I guess you'll have to wait for the box set to get the real extras!

Teaching Mrs. Tingle Review


OK
Once upon a time there was a writer named Kevin, who wanted to make a big splash in Hollywood. He wrote a movie called Killing Mrs. Tingle, which didn't sell, so he tried again. The next time he wrote a movie called Scream, which single-handedly revived the horror genre, paving the way for big horror flicks... and even small ones like The Blair Witch Project.

And then he made a TV show called Dawson's Creek, which was also a huge success. And another horror flick. And Scream 2. And then this writer was the hottest thing on Sunset Blvd., and even Killing Mrs. Tingle started to look good. Miramax bought it. They even let the guy direct.

Continue reading: Teaching Mrs. Tingle Review

Hendrix Review


OK
Wood Harris does an admirable job at portraying the late, legendary Jimi Hendrix, but VH-1's Behind the Music has more depth than this tepid docudrama. Showing Hendrix as a musical genius but utterly lacking any business sense, Hendrix gives us little more than a bunch of women and a procession of drugs to mark the life of one of the biggest musical pioneers of our time. Why waste 20 minutes cutting back and forth to footage of an "interview" with Hendrix before his death? Show the man's life!

Continue reading: Hendrix Review

Kill Bill: Volume 2 Review


Very Good

Everything the kinetic, colorful, superficially violent "Kill Bill: Volume 1" lacked in depth and character is remedied tenfold in Quentin Tarantino's stunning, cunning conclusion to his epic revenge fantasy.

Gone are the absurdist bloodbaths and the superficial grindhouse storytelling, and in their stead the wily writer-director transitions (with masterfully effortless cinematic aplomb) into a character- and dialogue-driven feast of substance and surprises -- which is, nonetheless, still punctuated by spectacularly stylish swordplay.

After a winking mock-noir prologue of recap narration, Tarantino opens "Volume 2" with a parched black-and-white flashback to the wedding rehearsal (glimpsed throughout last year's installment) at which The Bride (Uma Thurman), an unnamed and incognito former assassin trying to go straight, was brutally gunned down (along with everyone in attendance) by her former compatriots.

Continue reading: Kill Bill: Volume 2 Review

Double Take Review


Bad

Somewhere between "The Fugitive," "Bad Boys" and "Beverly Hills Cop" lies the plot of "Double Take," an action-comedy that's deadly short on both action and comedy.

Orlando Jones ("Make 7-Up yours!") stars as a posh Manhattan investment banker, with a supermodel girlfriend, who becomes a hunted man in an unnecessarily complex conspiracy of FBI and CIA agents when he discovers a $1.6 million irregularity in the accounts of a Mexican soda pop company -- his firm's biggest client -- and accidentally exposes the company as a drug front.

Because he's too stupid to ask questions of people who flash badges, he's soon on the run, trying to get to Mexico where a CIA spook has promised to protect him -- as if the CIA hasn't any branch offices in New York.

Continue reading: Double Take Review

Boat Trip Review


Unbearable

Driven entirely by tedious clichés, vulgar stereotypes, tawdry and low-brow raunch-as-comedy gags, and the degrading, almost minstrel-show antics of a mugging, rubber-faced Cuba Gooding Jr., "Boat Trip" is a gay-themed movie aimed squarely and exclusively at stupid straight people.

The contrived mix-up plot finds Gooding and John Belushi-wannabe Horatio Sanz ("Saturday Night Live") trapped onboard a cruise ship full of gay men for a weeklong voyage, and writer-director Mort Nathan (who scripted the Farrelly Brothers' "Kingpin") finds endless excuses for them to act cartoonishly homosexual in order to score with the few women on board.

Gooding has fallen for the ship's dance instructor (Roselyn Sanchez) -- a steamy Latina who walks around in see-through linen tops and three pounds of eye shadow while professing "I don't care about makeup, I don't care about what I'm wearing." Meanwhile fat, ugly, loutish Sanz has the hots for a brain-dead bimbo (Playboy Playmate Victoria Silvstedt) from the "Swedish suntanning team" who was rescued from a shipwreck along with a dozen other swimsuit models. Inexplicably, she has the hots for him too -- not because there's anything attractive about him whatsoever, but because the director is transparently more interested in any excuse for bug-eyed boob shots than he is in anything remotely resembling story or humor.

Continue reading: Boat Trip Review

Kingdom Come Review


Good

Director Doug McHenry strikes an impressively deft balance between slapstick and subtlety, satire and sincerity in the dysfunctional family funeral comedy "Kingdom Come."

Combining earnestly conflicted devotion with over-the-top raillery in much the same way "All In the Family" once did, the story concerns a clan called the Slocumbs gathering in their rural home town to say goodbye to an irascible patriarch. Daddy Bud, as he was known, was so universally disliked that his wife (Whoopi Goldberg) actually wants his headstone engraved with the eulogy "mean and surly."

The dead man's eldest son Ray Bud (LL Cool J) was probably closest to him, but his most vivid memory is of Daddy Bud ridiculing him over his drinking problem -- a problem he licked some time ago, although the stress of the funeral may cause a relapse.

Continue reading: Kingdom Come Review

Juwanna Mann Review


Terrible

The line flubs and other outtakes that run with some movies' closing credits are often the best part of a bad comedy, but "Juwanna Mann" is the first movie I've ever seen in which the outtakes contain all the cut scenes the movie needed to be any good at all.

This trite "Tootsie" redeux set in the world of professional basketball stars Miguel A. Nunez Jr. (he was the voodoo practitioner in last week's "Scooby-Doo") as Jamal Jeffries, a rich, arrogant, showboating, ball-hogging, tantrum-throwing NBA star who gets kicked off his team, goes broke and decides to dress up in drag so he can play in the women's basketball league. But get this: Not until the those aforementioned outtakes are there any scenes of Jamal trying to transform himself, wiggling into skirts and working on his high-heel walk.

He just shows up at a try-out for the fictitious Charlotte Banshees decked out as an unconvincing dame named Juwanna, swinging his hips and talking in a falsetto. He's offered a contract after five minutes of practice, which he signs without reading.

Continue reading: Juwanna Mann Review

Two Can Play That Game Review


Weak

A movie that preaches dishonesty, trickery and manipulation as the keys to romantic happiness, "Two Can Play That Game" is populated by pathetically shallow "players" of both sexes and very talented actors trapped by their skin color in a tired genre of self-perpetuating stereotypes.

"Two Can Play" is about a successful black ad executive (Vivica A. Fox) who thinks her man, a successful black lawyer (Morris Chestnut), may be running around on her. Her solution for shaping him up (rather than confronting him and having an adult conversation or just leaving to find someone better) is to launch into a 10-day plan that includes breaking up, not returning his calls, making sure he sees her with other men, going to his house, getting him hot, then leaving, and a whole litany of other vindictive head games.

Of course, all of this is meant to be risqué and amusing, but in fact it just makes the movie's heroine look like the kind of shrill, immature, self-centered strumpet whom no man in his right mind would want to be saddled with.

Continue reading: Two Can Play That Game Review

Ella Enchanted Review


OK

Following in the footsteps of the "Fractured Fairy Tales" cartoons, "The Princess Bride," "Ever After," "Shrek" and "A Knight's Tale" -- but never quite matching any of their wit or novelty -- "Ella Enchanted" is an amusingly self-aware fable of handsome princes, evil kings and one very plucky heroine caught up in a magic spell.

Aiming at the tween-ager crowd that made a hit of "The Princess Diaries," 2001's more modern twist on such girlish daydreams, light-hearted director Tommy O'Haver ("Get Over It," "Billy's Hollywood Screen Kiss") enlists "Diaries" charming star Anne Hathaway in the title role as a medieval teenager who was hexed at birth with an obedience spell by an irksome but well-meaning fairy (Vivica A. Fox, stuck in a mock-ghetto-fabulous stereotype).

Having grown up quite stubborn yet unable to resist any demand upon her, Ella manages to get through life keeping her curse on the QT until her widowed father brings home a wicked stepmother (Joanna Lumley) and two even worse and obnoxiously over-played step-sisters (Lucy Punch and Jennifer Higham), who quickly and cruelly figure out that they can make Ella their plaything.

Continue reading: Ella Enchanted Review

Vivica A Fox

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Vivica A Fox

Date of birth

30th July, 1964

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Female

Height

1.70




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Vivica A Fox Movies

Independence Day: Resurgence - Teaser Trailer

Independence Day: Resurgence - Teaser Trailer

Everyone knows the tale of David Levinson and Captain Steven Hiller, the two men at...

Black November Movie Review

Black November Movie Review

Nigerian filmmaker Jeta Amata clearly feels passionate about the problems in his country, but despite...

Home Run Trailer

Home Run Trailer

Cory Brand may be a hero when it comes to professional baseball, but when it...

The Slammin' Salmon Trailer

The Slammin' Salmon Trailer

Watch the trailer for The Slammin' Salmon When Cleon Salmon's career as a...

Ella Enchanted Movie Review

Ella Enchanted Movie Review

Ella Enchanted is a familiar fairytale: a young woman must overcome an extreme set of...

Juwanna Mann Movie Review

Juwanna Mann Movie Review

Hollywood's latest cross-dressing comedy comes from Warner Bros., a studio that up until now has...

Double Take Movie Review

Double Take Movie Review

New year, new pile of movies straight from the Hollywood dumping ground of badly test-screened,...

Two Can Play That Game Movie Review

Two Can Play That Game Movie Review

Two Can Play That Game turns love into a brutal battleground of the sexes....

Boat Trip Movie Review

Boat Trip Movie Review

Directors, screenwriters, and everyone else involved in making a movie have a singular task: make...

Kingdom Come Movie Review

Kingdom Come Movie Review

When LL Cool J stars in a movie with a title like Kingdom Come, you...

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