Virginie Ledoyen

Virginie Ledoyen

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Virginie Ledoyen - 70th Venice Film Festival - 'Gravity' - Premiere - Venice, Italy - Wednesday 28th August 2013

Virginie Ledoyen
Virginie Ledoyen

Virginie Ledoyen - 70th Venice Film Festival - Jury Members - Photocall - Venice, Italy - Wednesday 28th August 2013

Virginie Ledoyen
Virginie Ledoyen
Virginie Ledoyen

Virginie Ledoyen - 66th Cannes Film Festival - 'Jeune et Jolie' - Premiere - Cannes, United States - Thursday 16th May 2013

Virginie Ledoyen

Virginie Ledoyen - 66th Cannes Film Festival - The Bling Ring premiere - Cannes, France - Thursday 16th May 2013

Virginie Ledoyen
Virginie Ledoyen

Virginie Ledoyen and Cannes Film Festival Thursday 17th May 2012 De Rouille Et D'os (Rust and Bone) premiere during the 65th annual Cannes Film Festival

Virginie Ledoyen and Cannes Film Festival
Virginie Ledoyen and Cannes Film Festival
Virginie Ledoyen and Cannes Film Festival
Guest, Virginie Ledoyen and Cannes Film Festival

The Valet Review


Weak
After a lifetime of carefully calibrating small-idea comedies, French director Francis Veber hits his biggest movie to date. Already planned to be remade in America by the Farrelly brothers and Veber himself, The Valet marks the first time where Veber's deft skills at wild-eyed slapstick and quick-witted jabs have failed him in his endless fascination with the comedy of manners.

It all starts with a poor valet named Francois Pignon (Gad Elmalah), who wants to be the knight-in-shining-armor to his longtime friend and crush Emile (Virginie Ledoyen). Emile needs money to keep open her quaint little bookshop, money that Francois is sadly without. Enter Mr. Levasseur (the great Daniel Auteuil), a philandering corporate dud, and Elena (stunner Alice Taglioni), his model girlfriend, who get photographed together by accident, with Pignon right next to them. The scheme gets thick: The businessman will stake the dough for Emile's store if Francois pretends to be the model's lowly boyfriend. The tent for the media circus is quickly erected as Christine (Kristen Scott Thomas), the businessman's loaded wife, mounts her own investigation into the validity of the relationship.

Continue reading: The Valet Review

Bon Voyage Review


Weak
Roger Ebert once wrote that he would love to see a behind the scenes look at how a bad movie got made. Though it's certainly not the worst movie of 2004, people might get a kick out of a look at the French drama Bon Voyage and how the cast and crew turned a plot revolving around World War II, nuclear explosives, escaped convicts, and unrequited love into such a lifeless experience.

My nominee for the culprit would be the plot, which is convoluted and plodding. In short, Paris is in flux as the Nazis make their advances in 1940. A spoiled, petulant actress (Isabelle Adjani) travels with her new beau of convenience, the Prime Minister, played by a slim Gérard Depardieu. Meanwhile, her childhood friend (Grégori Derangère) - whom she inadvertently framed for murder - has escaped from jail.

Continue reading: Bon Voyage Review

The Beach Review


Good
Danny Boyle says he was "keen to distance this movie from Lord of the Flies, which The Beach has been unfairly compared to." Okay, so The Beach is not Lord of the Flies. Lord of the Flies has a lot more going for it.

Many a confused moviegoer has already asked me what the heck this film is about, since the trailer makes it out to be something akin to, er, Lord of the Flies. The movie, based on the novel by Alex Garland, traces the Thailand trip of young Richard (DiCaprio), who in Bangkok encounters a crazy guy named Daffy (Carlyle, who has nary an understandable line of dialogue in the whole movie).

Continue reading: The Beach Review

La Cérémonie Review


Excellent
Tireless French director Claude Chabrol returns to top form with the existential mind-scrambler La Cérémonie, a creepy and disturbing movie that gets under your skin from the very beginning. We know something bad is going to happen -- we just don't know what.

Sandrine Bonnaire (so memorable in East/West) plays a simple maid named Sophie -- so simple in fact that she doesn't know how to read. Hired on by an affluent family living in a large estate in a small town in the north of France, she proves herself an impeccable housekeeper. But when the man of the house calls home for her to fetch files off her desk or the matriarch hands her the shopping list, she invents excuses as to why they can't be done, all in an effort to hide her illiteracy.

Continue reading: La Cérémonie Review

8 Women Review


Weak
It's certainly admirable for a writer and/or director (in this case both) to take on a variety of genres. To pull off quirky comedy (Warm Drops on Burning Rocks) and then turn to a story of subtle human pain (Under the Sand) with as much exactness wins kudos in the Respect department. Some points for the ingenuity to weave in a handful of enthusiastic, never-used musical numbers need also be awarded. Working with deservedly reputable chameleons like Catherine Deneuve and Isabelle Huppert doesn't hurt any either. So why does 8 Women (not to be confused with 8 1/2 Women) fail to provide the simplest escapist entertainment?

Before pondering this, the question of whether or not a frivolous film is acceptable needs to be addressed. Mindless eye candy is redeemable when a) at least one character is fun to follow; b) some of the humor is fresh instead of feeling like a bunch of regurgitated stereotypes; c) not every single scene or line of dialogue is predictable, including the supposedly surprising conclusion.

Continue reading: 8 Women Review

8 Women Review


Very Good

An affectionate, sophisticated parody of Technicolor melodramas and musicals of the 1950s -- with a some mock-Agatha Christie thrown in for fun -- Francios Ozon's ironic, estrogen-overloaded "8 Women" is a cinema-couture candy whodunit, full of frivolous twists and frothy performances.

Set at a snowed-in country chateau in France where the man of the house has been found dead with a knife in his back, the artificially stylized film (sets are deliberately soundstagey, Dior-inspired costumes pop with color, characters are mock-'50s stereotypes) traps all its impeccably attired suspects in the house together (The phone line's been cut! The car has been sabotaged!) and slowly reveals each of their deep, dark secrets to fuel whimsical paranoid conjecture.

Could the killer be the man's well-bred bourgeois wife (Catherine Deneuve) who was never all that fond of him? How about their chic, beautiful, ostensibly virginal elder daughter (Virginie Ledoyen) or her tomboyish teenage sister (Ludivine Sagnier)? Perhaps his live-in mother-in-law (Danielle Darrieux) -- who had been faking the need to use a wheelchair for reasons unknown -- did it?

Continue reading: 8 Women Review

The Beach Review


OK

One would think that edgy, hallucinogenic "Trainspotting" team of Danny Boyle (director) and John Hodge (screenwriter) would be a perfect pair to adapt "The Beach," prodigy-novelist Alex Garland's edgy, hallucinogenic, travelogue about Southeast Asian adventure gone awry for a GenX-er with wanderlust.

Such a marriage of sensation-spawning literary innovation and cinematic audacity should, at the very least, produce a film that is engrossing, if not hypnotic.

But it appears 20th Century Fox put Boyle on a pretty short leash after investing $20 million to secure Leonardo DiCaprio for the movie's lead, because on film the final product is an utterly common and uninvolving amalgam of paradise photography, detached pop psychology and watered-down danger.

Continue reading: The Beach Review

Virginie Ledoyen

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Dev Patel Is A Lost Boy In Touching True Story Drama 'Lion'

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There's already an Oscars buzz surrounding this movie.

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Virginie Ledoyen Movies

The Valet Movie Review

The Valet Movie Review

After a lifetime of carefully calibrating small-idea comedies, French director Francis Veber hits his biggest...

Bon Voyage Movie Review

Bon Voyage Movie Review

Roger Ebert once wrote that he would love to see a behind the scenes look...

The Beach Movie Review

The Beach Movie Review

Danny Boyle says he was "keen to distance this movie from Lord of the Flies,...

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8 Women Movie Review

8 Women Movie Review

It's certainly admirable for a writer and/or director (in this case both) to take on...

8 Women Movie Review

8 Women Movie Review

An affectionate, sophisticated parody of Technicolor melodramas and musicals of the 1950s -- with a...

The Beach Movie Review

The Beach Movie Review

One would think that edgy, hallucinogenic "Trainspotting" team of Danny Boyle (director) and John Hodge...

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