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Lea Seydoux Misses 'Diary Of A Chambermaid' Premiere After "Mishaps" On 'James Bond: Spectre' Shoot


Lea Seydoux Daniel Craig Vincent Lindon Benoit Jacquot

Lea Seydoux missed the Berlin premiere of Diary of a Chambermaid in which she stars after "mishaps" on the set of the upcoming James Bond movie, Spectre. Seydoux was due to appear at the premiere on Saturday 7th January but the film's director, Benoit Jacquot, confirmed the 29-year-old actress was unable to attend. Seydoux stars opposite Daniel Craig in the upcoming Bond film, due to be released later this year. Unfortunately things do not appear to be running entirely smoothly as the filming schedule has been altered, causing Seydoux to miss the Berlin Film Festival event.

Lea Seydoux
Lea Seydoux was forced to miss the Berlin premiere of Diary of a Chambermaid.

Read More: Daniel Craig Raves After The Cast Of Spectre.

Continue reading: Lea Seydoux Misses 'Diary Of A Chambermaid' Premiere After "Mishaps" On 'James Bond: Spectre' Shoot

Vincent Lindon Leaves Hotel

Suzanne Lindon - Vincent Lindon and his daughter Suzanne Lindon leave their hotel in Manhattan - New York City, Manhattan, United States - Wednesday 10th July 2013

Vincent Lindon
Vincent Lindon and Suzanne Lindon
Vincent Lindon
Vincent Lindon and Suzanne Lindon
Vincent Lindon and Suzanne Lindon

Mademoiselle Chambon Review


Good
This French marital drama may feel elusive and slight, but it's extremely well observed, beautifully shot and acted with raw honesty. And virtually the entire plot takes place on an emotional level.

Jean (Lindon) is a builder who lives happily with his wife Anne-Marie (Atika) and their lively son Jeremy (Le Houerou). When Anne-Marie injures her back, Jean takes over her school run and meets Jeremy's teacher Veronique Chambon (Kiberlain), a lonely woman who moves to a new town each year with her job.

Jean and Veronique are instantly intrigued by each other: she asks him to repair a window in her flat, and he becomes intrigued by her violin-playing.

Continue reading: Mademoiselle Chambon Review

Picture - Vincent Lindon Berlin, Germany, Saturday 7th February 2009

Vincent Lindon Saturday 7th February 2009 flying into Tegel Airport from New York at 8am for the Berlin Film Festival (Berlinale) Berlin, Germany

Vincent Lindon
Vincent Lindon
Vincent Lindon
Vincent Lindon

Chaos (2001) Review


OK
Coline Serreau's Chaos is never quite sure of what it wants to be. The story of a Parisian woman who becomes involved with a prostitute fleeing a gang of pimps, the film could easily be summarized as a cat-and-mouse thriller. On the other hand, it's also the comical story of the same woman's bumbling husband and son, who - once she takes off on the lam with her new hooker companion - can't perform even the simplest household tasks without female supervision. And yet, more than anything else, it's a social drama about seemingly powerless women fighting back against a male-dominated society that physically and psychologically beats them into submissive roles. Wildly careening between crime drama, French farce, and woman's picture, the film frequently seems to be on the verge of splitting at the seams. But even if Chaos is hampered by a desire to be all things to all people, Serreau's nimble touch bestows this schizophrenic genre pastiche with an infectiously zany verve.

Hélène's (Catherine Frot) loveless marriage to Paul (Vincent Lindon) comes to a head when, while returning home from an evening out on the town, a hysterical hooker (Rachida Brakni, in a mesmerizing debut performance) throws herself on the hood of their car while attempting to escape a trio of savage attackers. Instead of trying to save the woman, Paul instinctively locks the doors, thus allowing the men to finish dishing out their brutal beating. When the assailants are done, Paul - a paragon of twenty-first century male insensitivity - is more interested in cleaning his windshield of prostitute blood than tending to the savagely beaten girl lying next to his shiny new sedan.

Continue reading: Chaos (2001) Review

Chaos Review


OK
Coline Serreau's Chaos is never quite sure of what it wants to be. The story of a Parisian woman who becomes involved with a prostitute fleeing a gang of pimps, the film could easily be summarized as a cat-and-mouse thriller. On the other hand, it's also the comical story of the same woman's bumbling husband and son, who - once she takes off on the lam with her new hooker companion - can't perform even the simplest household tasks without female supervision. And yet, more than anything else, it's a social drama about seemingly powerless women fighting back against a male-dominated society that physically and psychologically beats them into submissive roles. Wildly careening between crime drama, French farce, and woman's picture, the film frequently seems to be on the verge of splitting at the seams. But even if Chaos is hampered by a desire to be all things to all people, Serreau's nimble touch bestows this schizophrenic genre pastiche with an infectiously zany verve.

Hélène's (Catherine Frot) loveless marriage to Paul (Vincent Lindon) comes to a head when, while returning home from an evening out on the town, a hysterical hooker (Rachida Brakni, in a mesmerizing debut performance) throws herself on the hood of their car while attempting to escape a trio of savage attackers. Instead of trying to save the woman, Paul instinctively locks the doors, thus allowing the men to finish dishing out their brutal beating. When the assailants are done, Paul - a paragon of twenty-first century male insensitivity - is more interested in cleaning his windshield of prostitute blood than tending to the savagely beaten girl lying next to his shiny new sedan.

Continue reading: Chaos Review

The School of Flesh Review


Unbearable
School's out at The School of Flesh, a ridiculous and banal French melodrama about an older woman obsessed with a younger, male, bisexual prostitute. You know, just like in real life. Utterly without point, unless you consider Martinez's butt, which is in every other scene. Based on a Japanese novel -- how d'ya like that?

Continue reading: The School of Flesh Review

Friday Night Review


Excellent
The sun goes down, and the city lights of Paris slowly rise. The romantic melancholy of a girl's adventure story finds a haunting backdrop in Claire Denis's Friday Night. This follow-up to the ultraviolent vampire horror show Trouble Every Day feels like a contemporary fable, retaining the signature Denis touches of expressionistic images and aching sensuality. Sweet, shy Laure (Valérie Lemercier) is packing up the apartment on her final evening before moving in with her lover. Laure's the very portrait of ambivalence, a sharp twist on the male fear of commitment.

That Laure won't throw away her sexy red dress (saying, "I'll keep you," in one of her affectionate throwaway lines to household objects, clothing, and her beaten-up but friendly car) says she has some vitality in her yet, and hasn't quite finished exploring life's spontaneous opportunities. Going out for the night wearing a trés chic black dress, Laure gets stuck in a massive traffic jam, allowing regular Denis cinematographer Agnes Godard to rove between vehicles picking up details of Parisian life through rain-speckled car windows illuminated and obscured by neon, headlights, and shadows.

Continue reading: Friday Night Review

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