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Viggo Mortensen

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Viggo Mortensen posing alone and with Matt Ross and Annalise Brasso at the premiere of Bleecker Street's latest movie 'Captain Fantastic' held at Harmony Gold Theater. Viggo plays Ben, the father of a large family who live in the woods. Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 28th June 2016

Viggo Mortensen, Matt Ross and Annalise Brasso
Kathryn Hann and Viggo Mortensen
Kathryn Hann and Viggo Mortensen
Kathryn Hann and Viggo Mortensen
Kathryn Hann and Viggo Mortensen
Kathryn Hann and Viggo Mortensen

Viggo Mortensen, Matt RossAnnalise Basso, Charlie Shotwell , Shree Crooks - 69th Cannes Film Festival - 'Personal Shopper' - Premiere at Palais de Festivals, Cannes Film Festival - Cannes, France - Tuesday 17th May 2016

Viggo Mortensen, Matt Rossannalise Basso, Charlie Shotwell and Shree Crooks
Viggo Mortensen, Matt Rossannalise Basso, Charlie Shotwell and Shree Crooks
Viggo Mortensen, Matt Rossannalise Basso, Charlie Shotwell and Shree Crooks

Captain Fantastic- Teaser Trailer


Devoted father Ben (Viggo Mortensen) has been raising his six children in the forests of the Pacific NorthWest with his wife and teaches them the skills for a sustainable life off the grid. 

However the death of Ben's wife forces the family to be thrust into the real world and not live on the outside anymore, they are forced to integrate and learn new skills that make them 'fit in' with everyone else. This comes as a challenge for Ben as he quickly becomes under threat for his parenting skills and he finds himself questioning all that he has ever known. This film sees a family pulling together through a hard stage in their life and provides heart- warming entertainment. 

Captain Fantastic offers a unique look in to the lives of a family that have been cut off from the world and their different approach to living.

Federico Bossert, Viggo Mortensen and Diego Villar - Viggo Mortensen attends the presentation for the book 'Sons of the Forest' in Barcelona. The book by Bossert and Villar, which gathers a collection of the photographic work of German ethnographer Max Schmidt about the South American Indians, has been published by Mortensen at Museu Blau - Barcelona, Spain - Thursday 19th February 2015

Federico Bossert, Viggo Mortensen and Diego Villar
Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen

Stars of the film 'Far From Men' attended the official screening at the British Film Institute's London Film Festival held at the Vue West End

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen
Nick Cave and Viggo Mortensen
Nick Cave and Viggo Mortensen
Nick Cave and Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen

David Oelhoffen and Viggo Mortensen - Stars from French drama movie 'Loin des Hommes' including Viggo Mortenson and Reda Kateb appeared at a photo call during the 71st Venice International Film Festival - Venezia - Sunday 31st August 2014

David Oelhoffen and Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen and Reda Kateb
Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen

Viggo Mortensen and Aragorn - Accomplishing this feat requires many photos of the famous person/character, plenty of time, and a great deal of skill... something that Cruz quite clearly has! - New York City, New York, United States - Thursday 17th July 2014

Viggo Mortensen and Aragorn

Viggo Mortensen - Viggo Mortensen at Juau Photocall - Cannes, France - Sunday 18th May 2014

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen

Viggo Mortensen Calls Lord Of The Rings Movies "Straight To Video, Sloppy" Films


Viggo Mortensen Peter Jackson Lord Of The Rings

Viggo Mortensen, the actor best known for playing Aragorn in the Lord Of The Rings movies, says the second and third films in the franchise were "sloppy" movies and would have been straight-to-video had the first instalment not received critical acclaim. Mortensen doesn't mince his words about the trilogy in a new interview with The Telegraph, claiming that director Peter Jackson was practically "finished" before the first movie got a good reception at Cannes.

Viggo MortensonViggo Mortensen at the premiere of 'The Two Faces of January'

"Anybody who says they knew it [Lord of the Rings] was going to be the success it was, I don't think it's really true," he said.

Continue reading: Viggo Mortensen Calls Lord Of The Rings Movies "Straight To Video, Sloppy" Films

Kirsten Dunst, Viggo Mortensen and Daisy Bevan - Two Faces Of January - UK film premiere held at the Curzon Mayfair - London, United Kingdom - Monday 13th May 2013

Kirsten Dunst, Viggo Mortensen and Daisy Bevan
Kirsten Dunst, Viggo Mortensen and Daisy Bevan
Kirsten Dunst, Viggo Mortensen and Daisy Bevan
Kirsten Dunst
Kirsten Dunst
Kirsten Dunst

Hossein Amini, Oscar Isaac, Kirsten Dunst, Viggo Mortensen and Daisy Bevan - The Two Faces of January' U.K. film premiere held at the Curzon Mayfair - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 13th May 2014

Hossein Amini, Oscar Isaac, Kirsten Dunst, Viggo Mortensen and Daisy Bevan
Hossein Amini
Hossein Amini, Oscar Isaac, Kirsten Dunst, Viggo Mortensen and Daisy Bevan
Hossein Amini
Hossein Amini, Oscar Issac, Kirsten Dunst, Viggo Mortensen and Daisy Bevan

Viggo Mortensen and Daisy Bevan - Premiere of The Two Faces of January, 64th Berlin International Film Festival, (Berlinale), at the Zoo Palast - Berlin, Germany - Tuesday 11th February 2014

Viggo Mortensen and Daisy Bevan
Viggo Mortensen and Daisy Bevan
Viggo Mortensen, Daisy Bevan and Hossein Amini
Viggo Mortensen and Daisy Bevan
Viggo Mortensen and Daisy Bevan
Viggo Mortensen and Daisy Bevan

Hossein Amini and Viggo Mortensen - Photo call for The Two Faces of January, 64th Berlin International Film Festival, (Berlinale), at the Hyatt Potsdamer Platz - Berlin, Germany - Tuesday 11th February 2014

Hossein Amini and Viggo Mortensen
Hossein Amini, Viggo Mortensen and Daisy Bevan
Hossein Amini, Viggo Mortensen and Daisy Bevan
Hossein Amini, Viggo Mortensen and Daisy Bevan
Hossein Amini, Viggo Mortensen and Daisy Bevan
Hossein Amini, Viggo Mortensen and Daisy Bevan

Viggo Mortensen Tuesday 11th September 2012 2012 Toronto International Film Festival - Celebrity Sightings

Viggo Mortensen

Viggo Mortensen Monday 10th September 2012 leaving the Variety Gift Lounge at Holt Renfrew during the 2012 Toronto Film Festival

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen

On The Road Trailer


Sal Paradise is an ambitious young writer trying to find his place in the world. After his father passes away, he decides to seek out new experiences desperate to stay away from the mundaneness of everyday life. In New York, he meets ex-convict Dean Moriarty - an embodiment of the Beat Generation who fascinates him and ends up drawing him into his dangerous world of women, drugs and societal deviance. They hit the road alongside Dean's new, teenage wife Marylou doing anything and everything to ensure that new experiences never end and seek out their own freedom. Along the way they find who they really are, who their friends are and the meaning of being free.

Continue: On The Road Trailer

Keira Knightley, Michael Fassbender and Viggo Mortensen - Keira Knightley with Viggo Mortensen and Michael Fassbender Tuesday 31st January 2012 The gala premiere of A Dangerous Method at the Mayfair Hotel

Keira Knightley, Michael Fassbender and Viggo Mortensen
Keira Knightley, Michael Fassbender and Viggo Mortensen
Keira Knightley, Michael Fassbender and Viggo Mortensen
Keira Knightley, Michael Fassbender and Viggo Mortensen
Keira Knightley, Michael Fassbender and Viggo Mortensen
Keira Knightley, Michael Fassbender and Viggo Mortensen

Viggo Mortensen - Viggo Mortensen gives Dennis Hopper a hug Friday 26th March 2010 at Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame Los Angeles, California

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen and Jack Nicholson
Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen and Jack Nicholson

The Road Trailer


Watch the trailer for The Road

Continue: The Road Trailer

Appaloosa Review


Good
Unlike its immediate predecessors, which have retooled (Unforgiven), remade (3:10 To Yuma), revered (Open Range), and re-imagined (The Proposition) the genre, Ed Harris' Appaloosa is simply content being a good Western. It's unapologetic of its formula, unwilling to waver in its characterizations, and unhurried in its pace. It tells a story you've heard before -- more than once -- but it handles its business with rugged aplomb. That ought to be enough. But for some reason, it isn't.

It's 1882, and the intimidating landowner Randall Bragg (Jeremy Irons) casts a long shadow over the New Mexico town of Appaloosa. With three booming gun blasts, the film establishes Bragg's cold-blooded disdain for authority and utter lack of morals. Man, how I wish Appaloosa gave this character more time to breathe, develop, and wreck proper havoc.

Continue reading: Appaloosa Review

The Lord Of The Rings: The Two Towers Review


Very Good
Need I provide a pithy introduction to The Two Towers, the second installment in The Lord of the Rings trilogy? It's more hobbits, orcs, swords, and sorcery, so if you sawThe Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (and why would you be reading this if you hadn't?), you know what to expect.

And it's expectations that director Peter Jackson has clearly found himself having to address in this movie. Given that all three films in the series were shot simultaneously, Jackson doesn't have much opportunity to introduce new stuff with each movie. We're well familiarized with the main characters and the primary settings, so much of the weight falls on the new people and creatures introduced in this episode to carry the story.

Continue reading: The Lord Of The Rings: The Two Towers Review

The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring Review


Very Good
You think Harry Potter had expectations? It's a beloved book, sure, but it was published in 1997. In 10 years it will be as forgotten as The Bridges of Madison County. But J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings series dates all the way back to 1937 (when The Hobbit was published), and it's taken all these decades for someone to even attempt a live-action recreation of the trilogy of books. And not without reason.

How do you satisfy a legion of fans, some of whom have been waiting almost 65 years to see their absolute favorite work of literature put to film? More often than not, you don't, and though Peter Jackson's production of The Lord of the Rings is painstakingly faithful and earnest, it is almost a foregone conclusion that the movie will never quite be good enough for the obsessed fans (see also the 1978 animated Lord), just is it will be far too obtuse for those who haven't read the books.

Continue reading: The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring Review

The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King Review


Excellent
Peter Jackson returns with his third and final installment in The Lord of the Rings trilogy with the explosive - and exhausting - conclusion to his acclaimed series. Let's cut to the chase: Jackson's final entry is the best of the series, largely thanks to his pushing the boundaries of digital effects to their very limits.

Picking up after a flashback to Sméagol/Gollum's discovery of the ring many years earlier, the film then takes us back to the twin stories from Fellowship andThe Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers: Gandalf (Ian McKellen) and company are basking in the glory of victory at Helm's Deep and Isengard, while Frodo (Elijah Wood), Sam (Sean Astin), and Gollum trek toward Mount Doom to destroy the ring.

Continue reading: The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King Review

Crimson Tide Review


Very Good
The Cold War may be over, but it lives on through films like Crimson Tide.

Crimson Tide is a new action/psychodrama about a mutiny aboard a U.S. nuclear submarine. When World War III is about to erupt thanks to Russian coup-artists, the USS Alabama, helmed by Captain Frank Ramsey (Gene Hackman) is sent to prepare for the worst. When the order to launch comes in, Ramsey's executive officer, Lt. Commander Ron Hunter (Denzel Washington), clashes with the Captain over a last-minute, incomplete order which could recall the missile launch. The result is mutiny, with half the ship siding with the Captain's single-minded, stubborn decision to fire, half standing with Hunter, who wants a confirmation before blowing up the world.

Continue reading: Crimson Tide Review

Ringers: Lord Of The Fans Review


Good
Every good geek franchise has a corresponding picture about its freaky fanatics. Star Trek has Trekkies (1 and 2), Star Wars has The Phandom Menace, and Lord of the Rings has Master of the Rings. Er, and this film, Ringers (a term I don't believe is actually used by anyone, but I guess it's less insulting than "lordies" or "ringies"), which feels more than a little late to the party.

Ringers isn't just a fun-poking exercise like most of its brethern. Primarily it's an exhaustive history of Lord of the Rings, from J.R.R. Tolkein's life and times through such curiosities as Leonard Nimoy's ballad of Bilbo Baggins (google it) to the animated attempts at making the books into movies in the 1970s and '80s. Sure, the fans are covered, in part, and there are a few gems among them. My favorites are the ones who claim to be really into Tolkein, yet show up at the film's "confessional" booth dressed as Klingons or, inexplicably, as Johnny Depp's character from Pirates of the Caribbean. This largely passes without comment: In fact, that's the movie's major failing. It's far too respectful -- fawning, really -- of the obsessed fan base of Lord of the Rings to be truly entertaining. Hell, Dominic Monaghan, who played one of the hobbits, narrates the thing with an air of something that approaches austerity.

Continue reading: Ringers: Lord Of The Fans Review

Carlito's Way Review


Extraordinary
Spitting in the face of the idea that criminals are simply nurtured by their environments, legendary gangster Carlito Brigante (Al Pacino, doing a vague approximation of a Puerto Rican accent) stands before a judge in the 1993 Brian De Palma film Carlito's Way and refuses to blame his criminal ways on his upbringing or the fact that his mother died when he was young: "The fact is, your honor, I was a mean little bastard when she was alive."

It's a rebuke to the environment-nurtures-criminals mentality that infused the previous De Palma/Pacino collaboration from 10 years earlier, Scarface, which stands as the bloody and exciting but frankly pretty immature younger brother to the more stately and ultimately more affecting Carlito's Way. The differences are obvious right from the film's opening gunshot: Carlito's been popped and is being wheeled away to the hospital, musing as he dies, "Don't take me to no hospital... Some bitch always pops you at midnight when all they got is a Chinese intern with a wooden spoon." The rest of the film is in flashback, starting with Carlito being let out of jail after serving only five years of a 30-year-sentence and leading back up to that gunshot.

Continue reading: Carlito's Way Review

The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King Review


Excellent
Peter Jackson returns with his third and final installment in The Lord of the Rings trilogy with the explosive - and exhausting - conclusion to his acclaimed series. Let's cut to the chase: Jackson's final entry is the best of the series, largely thanks to his pushing the boundaries of digital effects to their very limits.

Picking up after a flashback to Sméagol/Gollum's discovery of the ring many years earlier, the film then takes us back to the twin stories from Fellowship and The Two Towers: Gandalf (Ian McKellen) and company are basking in the glory of victory at Helm's Deep and Isengard, while Frodo (Elijah Wood), Sam (Sean Astin), and Gollum trek toward Mount Doom to destroy the ring.

Continue reading: The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King Review

Crimson Tide Review


Very Good
The Cold War may be over, but it lives on through films like Crimson Tide.

Crimson Tide is a new action/psychodrama about a mutiny aboard a U.S. nuclear submarine. When World War III is about to erupt thanks to Russian coup-artists, the USS Alabama, helmed by Captain Frank Ramsey (Gene Hackman) is sent to prepare for the worst. When the order to launch comes in, Ramsey's executive officer, Lt. Commander Ron Hunter (Denzel Washington), clashes with the Captain over a last-minute, incomplete order which could recall the missile launch. The result is mutiny, with half the ship siding with the Captain's single-minded, stubborn decision to fire, half standing with Hunter, who wants a confirmation before blowing up the world.

Continue reading: Crimson Tide Review

28 Days Review


Weak
Everyone knows that writers are drunks. I mean, I'm drunk right now. I'm surprised I can type, you know, since my hands are shaking so bad and my vision is so blurry.

If you're ready to buy in to the writer-as-alcoholic cliché, you should just love 28 Days, which pulls out every stereotype in the book. Sandra Bullock stars as Gwen, the aforementioned drunk writer (living, naturally, in New York City), who ruins her sister's wedding by insulting her during the toast, falling on the cake, and wrecking the "just married" car by crashing it into a house! Off to rehab for her, where she meets a cast of characters drawn so broadly they could populate a sitcom on UPN.

Continue reading: 28 Days Review

G.I. Jane Review


Good
So it's a blatant, gimmicky ripoff of Top Gun, but G.I. Jane gave Demi Moore a chance to prove that she had more in her than was on display in Striptease. I don't know if they really beat the crap out of her during the production of this film, but it sure looks like they did. And that's worth two hours of my time.

The Prophecy Review


Bad
Huh? We've got vengeful angels, we've got a soul hidden in the body of a little girl, we've got Virginia Madsen as a brunette. We've got a plot that's hopelessly confusing and dully simple at the same time. We've got bad dialogue and sleep-inducing momentum -- and this is an action film. Naturally, what else did we get? Sequels.

Albino Alligator Review


Very Good
One of a growing list of recent directorial debuts by actors, Albino Alligator is Kevin Spacey's (Best Supporting Actor winner from The Usual Suspects) baby, and his film is probably the best of the lot. Because with this movie, Spacey proves that he can work just as well on either side of the camera.

A "box drama" of classic design, Albino Alligator is a psychological thriller set largely inside a New Orleans Prohibition-era bar still open in the 1990s. Dova (Matt Dillon), Milo (Gary Sinise), and Law (William Fichtner) are criminals on the run. After killing three cops with their car, the trio holes up in Dino's Last Chance Bar until things cool over, but the cops catch up with them soon enough. A game of cat-and-mouse hostage negotiation ensues, with Faye Dunaway, Viggo Mortensen, Skeet Ulrich, John Spencer, & M. Emmet Walsh as the victims, and Joe Mantegna as the head cop on the case.

Continue reading: Albino Alligator Review

A Walk On The Moon Review


Weak
Six producers for this? Let me just say that there's nothing more stomach-turning than the idea of Viggo Mortensen getting naked for the camera, but boy does his ass play a huge role in this movie. Diane Lane, as a repressed suburbanite summering in the Catskills on the eve of the 1969 moon landing, gets naked plenty, too. But the moon landing is a horrible poor metaphor for infidelity and the hackneyed "sexual awakenings" themes laid out here. For die-hard fans only.

The Passion Of Darkly Noon Review


OK
Darkly Noon is Brendan Fraser, a conflicted stutterer recently escaped from a Branch Davidian-esque cult besieged by the feds. His passion is Ashley Judd (blonde, braless, sweaty, and with unshaven pits), whose home he stumbles upon in the woods. What happens when worlds collide? Think Sling Blade, but far sleepier.

A History Of Violence Review


Excellent
Those well schooled in the history of cinema (or who've just seen a movie or two in their time) cannot help but look at the scenes of idyllic content occupying most of the beginning of A History of Violence without knowing that something bad is coming to bust up this happy family unit. Of course, they're helped along by the fact that the film opens on a chillingly calm scene - composed almost entirely of one tracking shot - in which a pair of laconic crooks on the lam execute a number of people in a small motel with about as much emotion as they'd use to pick up their dry cleaning. While the killers and the happy family are obviously on a collision course, it's not the violent impact that matters so much as the almost more shocking aftermath, and the secrets it may uncover.

Viggo Mortensen (in a welcome return to acting after too much time barking orders in elvish and swinging a broadsword from horseback) plays Tom Stall, a family man who runs a diner in a small Indiana town. He's not originally from the town, but he's been there long enough that everyone has long ago accepted him as one of their own. It's a normal life, Tom's young daughter has nightmares and his geeky teenage son Jack gets picked on at school, but other than that, things are good. Then the killers come into the diner right before closing, and just as they're about to execute a waitress, Tom springs into action, gunning them both down in spectacular fashion. Tom becomes a local celebrity but seems traumatized by the whole affair, wishing it could just be put behind him.

Continue reading: A History Of Violence Review

Psycho (1998) Review


Extraordinary
Well, they did it. Right down to the last scene where Marion Crane's car is dragged out of the river. And it's great. It is scarier, more frightening, and more disturbing than the original. And I was fair too. The day after watching the new version, I watched the old version. I generally don't like movies in black and white but I found the old version very enjoyable.

Now I now I'm the only critic who is going to say this in the world, but I thought Vince Vaughn was more effective as Norman Bates than Anthony Perkins was. There, I said it. Vaughn had a presence and a confidence on screen that paid off for him. Tony Perkins was great. So was Vaughn. Almost every aspect of the movie is better in a way except for the roles of Marion Crane and her boyfriend. Janet Leigh was more attractive and definitely a better actress then Anne Heche. Viggo Mortinsen is too dead-voiced for a major role in a thriller/horror movie. I just want to give this guy some coffee and get him to wake up.

Continue reading: Psycho (1998) Review

Daylight Review


Weak
Pretty stupid Poseidon Adventure/Towering Inferno/Die Hard wannabe, with Sylvester Stallone (as disgraced paramedic) rescuing a ton of people from a collapsed, burning, air-limited tunnel. Oh dear! Some interesting set building (yep, looks like a tunnel) doesn't come close to making up for the cheeseball dialogue, action scenes, and attempts by Stallone at looking "serious."

A History Of Violence Review


Weak

David Cronenberg is out of his element in "A History of Violence," and it shows.

The director best known for an edgy, uncanny, sometimes gruesome style of cerebral macabre tries to put his stamp on this graphic novel adaptation about the humble owner of a small-town diner (Viggo Mortensen) thrust into a dark world of mobsters and a confrontation with his own identity. But the film feels fresh and vital only in the darkly humorous opening scene, involving two cold-blooded thugs checking out of a motel, and during the second act in which Mortensen's family comes under threat after he spontaneously shoots the very same thugs (with their own guns) when they attempt to violently take over his restaurant.

As a result of his heroism -- and the suspicious precision of his kill -- members of the Philadelphia mafia who saw Tom Stahl (Mortensen) on TV soon come to town convinced he's one of them -- the runaway brother of a crime boss who left a lot of gangland untidiness in his wake when he disappeared some 20-odd years before.

Continue reading: A History Of Violence Review

Hidalgo Review


Good

"Hidalgo" stars the magnetically scruffy and unruffled Viggo Mortensen ("The Lord of the Rings") as Frank Hopkins, a famously fast Pony Express rider who became a long-distance legend in 1890 when he and his undersized mustang were the first Westerners to enter the most grueling horse race in the world -- 3,000 parched miles across the Arabian desert.

The film is based on a true story -- well, except for the romance with a sheikh's fiery daughter, the swordfights and shootouts, the kidnapping, and the conspiracies and double-crosses that lead to such things. (Now that's what I call fictionalization!) But if there's a good movie to be made from such archaic adventure clichés, this picture has the right guy behind the wheel: director Joe Johnston.

Having helmed "The Rocketeer," Disney's wonderfully corny revival of 1940s science-fiction superhero-dom, and "October Sky," a vivid, timeless, 1950s-style feel-good biography about a real NASA scientist's rocket-building teens, Johnston has a knack for finding freshness in the most hackneyed of stories. He even breathed new surprises into the third "Jurassic Park" movie. So bring on the quicksand, sandstorms and locusts! After "Hidalgo," I'm starting to think this guy can mold any perfunctory script into a thoroughly fun and satisfying Saturday matinee.

Continue reading: Hidalgo Review

Viggo Mortensen

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Viggo Mortensen

Date of birth

20th October, 1958

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.80


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Viggo Mortensen Movies

Captain Fantastic Movie Review

Captain Fantastic Movie Review

An offbeat comedy-drama with a timely kick, this charming family road trip takes on some...

Captain Fantastic- Teaser Trailer

Captain Fantastic- Teaser Trailer

Devoted father Ben (Viggo Mortensen) has been raising his six children in the forests of...

The Two Faces of January Movie Review

The Two Faces of January Movie Review

This sun-drenched thriller is much more than a pretty picture: it's also a slow-burning story...

The Two Faces Of January Trailer

The Two Faces Of January Trailer

Chester MacFarland is a wealthy businessman whose business ventures are often far from lawful. During...

Everybody Has a Plan [Todos Tenemos un Plan] Movie Review

Everybody Has a Plan [Todos Tenemos un Plan] Movie Review

While it's fascinating to see Viggo Mortensen starring in an Argentine thriller, the film itself...

On the Road Movie Review

On the Road Movie Review

Despite the skill behind and in front of the camera, a badly constructed script flattens...

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On The Road Trailer

On The Road Trailer

Sal Paradise is an ambitious young writer trying to find his place in the world....

A Dangerous Method Movie Review

A Dangerous Method Movie Review

Cronenberg's brainy approach makes this film fascinating but demanding as it traces the birth of...

A Dangerous Method Trailer

A Dangerous Method Trailer

Set in Vienna before the start of World War One, Carl Jung, a student of...

The Road Trailer

The Road Trailer

Watch the trailer for The Road When an unexplained cataclysm destroys most of the developed...

Good Trailer

Good Trailer

Watch the trailer for Good. Good is an emotional tale of John Halder, a university...

Appaloosa Movie Review

Appaloosa Movie Review

Unlike its immediate predecessors, which have retooled (Unforgiven), remade (3:10 To Yuma), revered (Open Range),...

Eastern Promises, Trailer Trailer

Eastern Promises, Trailer Trailer

Eastern PromisesTrailerEastern Promises is the new thriller from the Director David Cronenburg re-teams him with...

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