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Annalise Basso at the 10th Annual Women In Film Pre-Oscar Cocktail Party Presented By Max Mara And BMW held at Nightingale Plaza - West Hollywood, California, United States - Friday 24th February 2017

Annalise Basso, Cathy Schulman and Viggo Mortensen
Annalise Basso, Cathy Schulman and Viggo Mortensen
Annalise Basso and Viggo Mortensen
Annalise Basso and Viggo Mortensen
Annalise Basso and Viggo Mortensen
Annalise Basso and Viggo Mortensen

Viggo Mortensen attending the 2017 EE British Academy Of Film And Television Arts Awards held at the Royal Albert Hall - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 12th February 2017

Viggo Mortensen

Viggo Mortensen at the 2017 EE British Academy Film Awards held at the Royal Albert Hall - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 12th February 2017

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen

Viggo Mortensen at the 89th Oscars Nominees Luncheon 2017 held in the Grand Ballroom at the Beverly Hilton Hotel - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 6th February 2017

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen

Viggo Mortensen arrives at the 23rd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards (SAG) 2017 held at The Shrine Auditorium Media Complex - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 29th January 2017

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen
Erin Moriarty, Annalise Basso, George Mackay, Trin Miller, Shree Crooks, Nicholas Hamilton, Matt Ross, Viggo Mortensen, Samantha Isler and Charlie Shotwell
Erin Moriarty, Annalise Basso, George Mackay, Trin Miller, Shree Crooks, Nicholas Hamilton, Matt Ross, Viggo Mortensen, Samantha Isler and Charlie Shotwell
Erin Moriarty, Trin Miller, Shree Crooks, Nicholas Hamilton, Matt Ross, Viggo Mortensen, Samantha Isler and Charlie Shotwell

Viggo Mortensen posing alone and with Matt Ross and Annalise Brasso at the premiere of Bleecker Street's latest movie 'Captain Fantastic' held at Harmony Gold Theater. Viggo plays Ben, the father of a large family who live in the woods. Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 28th June 2016

Viggo Mortensen, Matt Ross and Annalise Brasso
Kathryn Hann and Viggo Mortensen
Kathryn Hann and Viggo Mortensen
Kathryn Hann and Viggo Mortensen
Kathryn Hann and Viggo Mortensen
Kathryn Hann and Viggo Mortensen

Captain Fantastic- Teaser Trailer


Devoted father Ben (Viggo Mortensen) has been raising his six children in the forests of the Pacific NorthWest with his wife and teaches them the skills for a sustainable life off the grid. 

However the death of Ben's wife forces the family to be thrust into the real world and not live on the outside anymore, they are forced to integrate and learn new skills that make them 'fit in' with everyone else. This comes as a challenge for Ben as he quickly becomes under threat for his parenting skills and he finds himself questioning all that he has ever known. This film sees a family pulling together through a hard stage in their life and provides heart- warming entertainment. 

Captain Fantastic offers a unique look in to the lives of a family that have been cut off from the world and their different approach to living.

Stars of the film 'Far From Men' attended the official screening at the British Film Institute's London Film Festival held at the Vue West End

Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen
Nick Cave and Viggo Mortensen
Nick Cave and Viggo Mortensen
Nick Cave and Viggo Mortensen
Viggo Mortensen

Viggo Mortensen and Aragorn - Accomplishing this feat requires many photos of the famous person/character, plenty of time, and a great deal of skill... something that Cruz quite clearly has! - New York City, New York, United States - Thursday 17th July 2014

Viggo Mortensen and Aragorn

Viggo Mortensen Calls Lord Of The Rings Movies "Straight To Video, Sloppy" Films


Viggo Mortensen Peter Jackson Lord Of The Rings

Viggo Mortensen, the actor best known for playing Aragorn in the Lord Of The Rings movies, says the second and third films in the franchise were "sloppy" movies and would have been straight-to-video had the first instalment not received critical acclaim. Mortensen doesn't mince his words about the trilogy in a new interview with The Telegraph, claiming that director Peter Jackson was practically "finished" before the first movie got a good reception at Cannes.

Viggo MortensonViggo Mortensen at the premiere of 'The Two Faces of January'

"Anybody who says they knew it [Lord of the Rings] was going to be the success it was, I don't think it's really true," he said.

Continue reading: Viggo Mortensen Calls Lord Of The Rings Movies "Straight To Video, Sloppy" Films

Hossein Amini and Viggo Mortensen - Photo call for The Two Faces of January, 64th Berlin International Film Festival, (Berlinale), at the Hyatt Potsdamer Platz - Berlin, Germany - Tuesday 11th February 2014

Hossein Amini and Viggo Mortensen
Hossein Amini, Viggo Mortensen and Daisy Bevan
Hossein Amini, Viggo Mortensen and Daisy Bevan
Hossein Amini, Viggo Mortensen and Daisy Bevan
Hossein Amini, Viggo Mortensen and Daisy Bevan
Hossein Amini, Viggo Mortensen and Daisy Bevan

On The Road Trailer


Sal Paradise is an ambitious young writer trying to find his place in the world. After his father passes away, he decides to seek out new experiences desperate to stay away from the mundaneness of everyday life. In New York, he meets ex-convict Dean Moriarty - an embodiment of the Beat Generation who fascinates him and ends up drawing him into his dangerous world of women, drugs and societal deviance. They hit the road alongside Dean's new, teenage wife Marylou doing anything and everything to ensure that new experiences never end and seek out their own freedom. Along the way they find who they really are, who their friends are and the meaning of being free.

Continue: On The Road Trailer

Keira Knightley, Michael Fassbender and Viggo Mortensen - Keira Knightley with Viggo Mortensen and Michael Fassbender Tuesday 31st January 2012 The gala premiere of A Dangerous Method at the Mayfair Hotel

Keira Knightley, Michael Fassbender and Viggo Mortensen
Keira Knightley, Michael Fassbender and Viggo Mortensen
Keira Knightley, Michael Fassbender and Viggo Mortensen
Keira Knightley, Michael Fassbender and Viggo Mortensen
Keira Knightley, Michael Fassbender and Viggo Mortensen
Keira Knightley, Michael Fassbender and Viggo Mortensen

The Road Trailer


Watch the trailer for The Road

Continue: The Road Trailer

Appaloosa Review


Good
Unlike its immediate predecessors, which have retooled (Unforgiven), remade (3:10 To Yuma), revered (Open Range), and re-imagined (The Proposition) the genre, Ed Harris' Appaloosa is simply content being a good Western. It's unapologetic of its formula, unwilling to waver in its characterizations, and unhurried in its pace. It tells a story you've heard before -- more than once -- but it handles its business with rugged aplomb. That ought to be enough. But for some reason, it isn't.

It's 1882, and the intimidating landowner Randall Bragg (Jeremy Irons) casts a long shadow over the New Mexico town of Appaloosa. With three booming gun blasts, the film establishes Bragg's cold-blooded disdain for authority and utter lack of morals. Man, how I wish Appaloosa gave this character more time to breathe, develop, and wreck proper havoc.

Continue reading: Appaloosa Review

Eastern Promises Review


Excellent
We're in London and the streets look like they are owned and operated by Beelzebub himself. The ghosts of the KGB death squads loom in the distance, but the Russian crime syndicate's stranglehold over the hoods and alleys is as strong as ever. Out of one of these decrepit alleyways crawls a 14-year-old girl who walks into a pharmacy only moments before hemorrhaging from the baby girl inside her. Her death is announced at the same time as her daughter's birth. Welcome to the decaying London of David Cronenberg's Eastern Promises.

A master at the ancient art of phantom punching, Cronenberg's examination of the Russian mafia's sex trade, currently flourishing in London, doesn't hit you till you're a good quarter mile out of the theater, as you're still contemplating Viggo Mortensen's slicked-back hairdo. Like a cccwolf right before the hunt, Mortensen snarls and calmly stalks as Nikolai, the driver for a sect of the elusive crime syndicate Vory V Zakone, a specter that arose from the ashes of Stalin's work camps. Nikolai works for Semyon (Armin Mueller-Stahl) and Semyon's volatile son Kirill (Vincent Cassel), taking care of their transportation and their criminal refuse. When Nikolai snaps off the fingers of a corpse, he asks Kirill and his business associate Azim (Mina E. Mina) to leave... but the audience is allowed to stay.

Continue reading: Eastern Promises Review

The Lord Of The Rings: The Two Towers Review


Very Good
Need I provide a pithy introduction to The Two Towers, the second installment in The Lord of the Rings trilogy? It's more hobbits, orcs, swords, and sorcery, so if you sawThe Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (and why would you be reading this if you hadn't?), you know what to expect.

And it's expectations that director Peter Jackson has clearly found himself having to address in this movie. Given that all three films in the series were shot simultaneously, Jackson doesn't have much opportunity to introduce new stuff with each movie. We're well familiarized with the main characters and the primary settings, so much of the weight falls on the new people and creatures introduced in this episode to carry the story.

Continue reading: The Lord Of The Rings: The Two Towers Review

The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring Review


Very Good
You think Harry Potter had expectations? It's a beloved book, sure, but it was published in 1997. In 10 years it will be as forgotten as The Bridges of Madison County. But J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings series dates all the way back to 1937 (when The Hobbit was published), and it's taken all these decades for someone to even attempt a live-action recreation of the trilogy of books. And not without reason.

How do you satisfy a legion of fans, some of whom have been waiting almost 65 years to see their absolute favorite work of literature put to film? More often than not, you don't, and though Peter Jackson's production of The Lord of the Rings is painstakingly faithful and earnest, it is almost a foregone conclusion that the movie will never quite be good enough for the obsessed fans (see also the 1978 animated Lord), just is it will be far too obtuse for those who haven't read the books.

Continue reading: The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring Review

The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King Review


Excellent
Peter Jackson returns with his third and final installment in The Lord of the Rings trilogy with the explosive - and exhausting - conclusion to his acclaimed series. Let's cut to the chase: Jackson's final entry is the best of the series, largely thanks to his pushing the boundaries of digital effects to their very limits.

Picking up after a flashback to Sméagol/Gollum's discovery of the ring many years earlier, the film then takes us back to the twin stories from Fellowship andThe Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers: Gandalf (Ian McKellen) and company are basking in the glory of victory at Helm's Deep and Isengard, while Frodo (Elijah Wood), Sam (Sean Astin), and Gollum trek toward Mount Doom to destroy the ring.

Continue reading: The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King Review

Crimson Tide Review


Very Good
The Cold War may be over, but it lives on through films like Crimson Tide.

Crimson Tide is a new action/psychodrama about a mutiny aboard a U.S. nuclear submarine. When World War III is about to erupt thanks to Russian coup-artists, the USS Alabama, helmed by Captain Frank Ramsey (Gene Hackman) is sent to prepare for the worst. When the order to launch comes in, Ramsey's executive officer, Lt. Commander Ron Hunter (Denzel Washington), clashes with the Captain over a last-minute, incomplete order which could recall the missile launch. The result is mutiny, with half the ship siding with the Captain's single-minded, stubborn decision to fire, half standing with Hunter, who wants a confirmation before blowing up the world.

Continue reading: Crimson Tide Review

Ringers: Lord Of The Fans Review


Good
Every good geek franchise has a corresponding picture about its freaky fanatics. Star Trek has Trekkies (1 and 2), Star Wars has The Phandom Menace, and Lord of the Rings has Master of the Rings. Er, and this film, Ringers (a term I don't believe is actually used by anyone, but I guess it's less insulting than "lordies" or "ringies"), which feels more than a little late to the party.

Ringers isn't just a fun-poking exercise like most of its brethern. Primarily it's an exhaustive history of Lord of the Rings, from J.R.R. Tolkein's life and times through such curiosities as Leonard Nimoy's ballad of Bilbo Baggins (google it) to the animated attempts at making the books into movies in the 1970s and '80s. Sure, the fans are covered, in part, and there are a few gems among them. My favorites are the ones who claim to be really into Tolkein, yet show up at the film's "confessional" booth dressed as Klingons or, inexplicably, as Johnny Depp's character from Pirates of the Caribbean. This largely passes without comment: In fact, that's the movie's major failing. It's far too respectful -- fawning, really -- of the obsessed fan base of Lord of the Rings to be truly entertaining. Hell, Dominic Monaghan, who played one of the hobbits, narrates the thing with an air of something that approaches austerity.

Continue reading: Ringers: Lord Of The Fans Review

The Lord Of The Rings: The Two Towers Review


Very Good
Need I provide a pithy introduction to The Two Towers, the second installment in The Lord of the Rings trilogy? It's more hobbits, orcs, swords, and sorcery, so if you saw The Fellowship of the Ring (and why would you be reading this if you hadn't?), you know what to expect.

And it's expectations that director Peter Jackson has clearly found himself having to address in this movie. Given that all three films in the series were shot simultaneously, Jackson doesn't have much opportunity to introduce new stuff with each movie. We're well familiarized with the main characters and the primary settings, so much of the weight falls on the new people and creatures introduced in this episode to carry the story.

Continue reading: The Lord Of The Rings: The Two Towers Review

The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring Review


Very Good
You think Harry Potter had expectations? It's a beloved book, sure, but it was published in 1997. In 10 years it will be as forgotten as The Bridges of Madison County. But J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings series dates all the way back to 1937 (when The Hobbit was published), and it's taken all these decades for someone to even attempt a live-action recreation of the trilogy of books. And not without reason.

How do you satisfy a legion of fans, some of whom have been waiting almost 65 years to see their absolute favorite work of literature put to film? More often than not, you don't, and though Peter Jackson's production of The Lord of the Rings is painstakingly faithful and earnest, it is almost a foregone conclusion that the movie will never quite be good enough for the obsessed fans (see also the 1978 animated Lord), just is it will be far too obtuse for those who haven't read the books.

Continue reading: The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring Review

Hidalgo Review


Weak
According to history, for centuries a 3,000 mile race known as the "Ocean of Fire" was run by young thoroughbred horses across the Arabian Desert. This race is the focal point of Hidalgo - a story about a man and his titular horse, who in 1890, surprised the world by winning. What's unclear is that this race may not have taken place!

As the story goes, Hidalgo was considered a long shot to win the race because he was a Mustang, in a race of faster, stronger Arabians. Hidalgo appealed to a wealthy Sheik (Omar Sharif) who brought the horse and its legendary rider Frank T. Hopkins (Viggo Mortensen) from the United States halfway across the world to participate. Despite a potential claim for fame and fortune, Frank is participating for entirely personal reasons. Frank wants to help his half-blood Indian tribe buy back land from the U.S. government that they can use to raise their horses.

Continue reading: Hidalgo Review

The Portrait Of A Lady Review


Very Good
Jesus, I didn't realize when I went to the movies this morning I was going to have to think!

But seriously, that's what you're going to be doing if you see The Portrait of a Lady -- Jane Campion's follow-up to The Piano, based on Henry James's "classic" novel that you've probably never read. Now, I'm wishing that I had, though, because Portrait is a fantastic movie to watch, exquisitely crafted and painstakingly detailed, gorgeously photographed and full of style -- but it is just plain impossible to follow.

Continue reading: The Portrait Of A Lady Review

A Walk On The Moon Review


Good

Somehow "A Walk On the Moon," which takes place at a working-classJewish resort in upstate New York during the summer of 1969, manages tovisit every iconic event of that characteristic season which defined ageneration without ever feeling like a parade of trite and recycled bohemiancliches.

I'm not entirely sure how this miracle was performed, butformer supporting actor turned director TonyGoldwyn (the bad yuppie in "Ghost"),manages to embrace the rampant and inevitable Moon walk watching, Vietnamtalking and Woodstock going, yet refuses to let them weigh down his picture,narrowing his focus instead on Pearl Kartrowitz (Diane Lane), a discontentedBrooklyn housewife who succumbs to the spirit of that summer while on vacationin the Catskills and has an affair with a enigmatic free spirit (ViggoMortensen).

Continue reading: A Walk On The Moon Review

Lord Of The Rings:
the Two Towers Review


Good

Unless you're a "Lord of the Rings" superfan, you'd better brush up on "Fellowship of the Ring" before seeing the sequel "The Two Towers," because director Peter Jackson just jumps right in to the middle of the story without much in the way of introductions or explanations.

He assumes you know who Hobbits Merry and Pippin are and why they've been abducted by the Uruk-Hai, the beastly minions of unseen supernatural villain Sauron (you know all about them, right?). He assumes you recall where "Fellowship" left off with human warrior Aragorn (Viggo Mortensen) and Elfin archer Legolas (Orlando Bloom), and why they're trying to rescue Merry and Pippin.

He also assumes you know that hero Hobbits Frodo and Sam (Elijah Wood and Sean Austin) are still trying to reach the kingdom of Mordor, where they are to cast the dangerously omnipotent Ring into the volcanic fires of Mount Doom, thus keeping it out of the hands Sauron, who would use its dark psychic powers to lay waste to the world.

Continue reading: Lord Of The Rings:
the Two Towers Review

Lord Of The Rings: Fellowship Of The Ring Review


Good

In the entire three hours of the audacious, transporting, spectacularly cinematic first "Lord of the Rings" installment, there are only two very brief moments that don't come across as being 100-percent a part of the mystical, dark and magical realm of Middle Earth.

These moments are not because of bad performances (there aren't any), negligent directing or special effects gaffes. In fact, from the digitally dialed-down stature of the actors playing hobbits to the frightfully demonic hoards of living-dead orcs (minions of the supernaturally evil antagonist), the effects are seamless.

These moments of doubt are merely scenes that take place in such plain locations (e.g. a non-descript river bed) that they seem far too familiar and Earthly in a movie of underground troll cities, ominous mountains called Doom, idyllic ancient forest hamlets of immortal elves, and hobbit's homes burrowed into impossibly green hillsides.

Continue reading: Lord Of The Rings: Fellowship Of The Ring Review

The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King Review


Good

By the time hobbit hero Frodo Baggins (Elijah Wood) finally -- finally! -- struggles to the top of Mount Doom, where at the climax of "The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King" he must cast into its volcanic fires the malevolently omnipotent Ring that has been slowly consuming his psyche for three movies now, many of the nit-picky things that have gotten on my nerves throughout all the "Lord of the Rings" flicks had come to a head.

So many times now has Frodo's whiney, obsequious traveling companion Samwise Gamgee (Sean Austin) begun boo-hoo-hooing that I started rooting for him to be chucked into the lava along with the jewelry. One too many times has a lucky coincidence saved our hero, as when in this picture he's captured by the demonic, bad-tempered Orcs, only to be rescued moments later when his two guards -- the only two guards in an entire tower it seems -- are conveniently distracted by fighting with each other.

And once too often has director Peter Jackson assumed that the previous installments will be fresh in minds of the audience. That's a pretty safe bet for his fan base, but for the unobsessed, "Return of the King" -- like "The Two Towers" before it -- has many what-did-I-miss? moments. For example, in one of two climactic battle scenes, a never-identified army of fearsome face-painted foes riding atop gigantic elephants appears on the flank of the protagonists' battalion, prompting the question, "Who the heck are these guys?" (Apparently they were in the second movie too, but pardon me for not having seen it since last year.)

Continue reading: The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King Review

28 Days Review


Good

Director Betty Thomas' name in the opening credits of "28 Days" came as a big relief leading in to what looked like a soft-pedaled, politically corrected comedy about a happy-go-unlucky drunk -- played by button-cute Sandra Bullock -- wise-cracking her way through rehab.

It was reassuring to see that the woman holding the reins was a filmmaker who certainly knows how to turn a sow's ear into a silk purse. I mean, if she could make Howard Stern not only presentable but borderline sentimental (and without a hint of saccharine whitewash) in "Private Parts," surely a touchy subject like alcoholism is safe in her hands.

And so it is. Striking a sure-footed balance between its addiction woe and impudent humor, Thomas isn't afraid to scoff at twelve-steppers and include jests of questionable taste while still pulling off a story of a woman's difficult personal journey toward sobriety.

Continue reading: 28 Days Review

Viggo Mortensen

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Viggo Mortensen

Date of birth

20th October, 1958

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.80


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Viggo Mortensen Movies

Captain Fantastic Movie Review

Captain Fantastic Movie Review

An offbeat comedy-drama with a timely kick, this charming family road trip takes on some...

Captain Fantastic- Teaser Trailer

Captain Fantastic- Teaser Trailer

Devoted father Ben (Viggo Mortensen) has been raising his six children in the forests of...

The Two Faces of January Movie Review

The Two Faces of January Movie Review

This sun-drenched thriller is much more than a pretty picture: it's also a slow-burning story...

The Two Faces Of January Trailer

The Two Faces Of January Trailer

Chester MacFarland is a wealthy businessman whose business ventures are often far from lawful. During...

Everybody Has a Plan [Todos Tenemos un Plan] Movie Review

Everybody Has a Plan [Todos Tenemos un Plan] Movie Review

While it's fascinating to see Viggo Mortensen starring in an Argentine thriller, the film itself...

On the Road Movie Review

On the Road Movie Review

Despite the skill behind and in front of the camera, a badly constructed script flattens...

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On The Road Trailer

On The Road Trailer

Sal Paradise is an ambitious young writer trying to find his place in the world....

A Dangerous Method Movie Review

A Dangerous Method Movie Review

Cronenberg's brainy approach makes this film fascinating but demanding as it traces the birth of...

A Dangerous Method Trailer

A Dangerous Method Trailer

Set in Vienna before the start of World War One, Carl Jung, a student of...

The Road Trailer

The Road Trailer

Watch the trailer for The Road When an unexplained cataclysm destroys most of the developed...

Good Trailer

Good Trailer

Watch the trailer for Good. Good is an emotional tale of John Halder, a university...

Appaloosa Movie Review

Appaloosa Movie Review

Unlike its immediate predecessors, which have retooled (Unforgiven), remade (3:10 To Yuma), revered (Open Range),...

Eastern Promises, Trailer Trailer

Eastern Promises, Trailer Trailer

Eastern PromisesTrailerEastern Promises is the new thriller from the Director David Cronenburg re-teams him with...

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