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Vanessa Redgrave - BFI London Film Festival 'Foxcatcher' American Express gala screening at Odeon Leicester Square - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 16th October 2014

Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave and Guests

Vanessa Redgrave - BFI London Film Festival - 'Foxcatcher' - Premiere at Odeon Leicester Square - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 16th October 2014

Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave

Vanessa Redgrave - London Film Festival screening of Foxcatcher at Odeon Leicester Square - London, United Kingdom - Friday 17th October 2014

Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave

Vanessa Redgrave, Raphael Nero, Carlo Nero and Michael Neeson - LFF: Foxcatcher - American Express gala at Odeon Leicester Square - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 16th October 2014

Vanessa Redgrave, Raphael Nero, Carlo Nero and Michael Neeson
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave

Vanessa Redgrave - Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) - 'Foxcatcher' - Premiere - Toronto, Ontario, Canada - Monday 8th September 2014

Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave

Vanessa Redgrave - Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) - 'Foxcatcher' - Photocall - Toronto, Ontario, Canada - Monday 8th September 2014

Vanessa Redgrave - A demonstration takes place outside Pentonville Prison during which writers gathered for a poetry reading demonstrating against prisoners being denied access to books - London, United Kingdom - Friday 28th March 2014

Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave

Vanessa Redgrave, Vaclav Havel and Seamus Heaney - Irish poet and Nobel Prize for Literature Seamus Heaney - Dublin, Ireland - Friday 30th August 2013

Vanessa Redgrave - Culture Project Gala opening of newly named Lynn Redgrave Theatre at Stage 48 - New York City, NY, United States - Tuesday 4th June 2013

Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave and Trudie Styler
Vanessa Redgrave, Kyra Sedgwick, Kevin Bacon and Trudie Styler
Trudie Styler and Vanessa Redgrave

Vanessa Redgrave - Culture Project Gala opening of newly named Lynn Redgrave Theatre at Stage 48 - New York City, NY, United States - Monday 3rd June 2013

Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave, Kyra Sedwick, Kevin Bacon and Trudie Styler
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave

Joely Richardson (l-r), Daisy Bevan and Vanessa Redgrave - 'PUNK: Chaos to Couture' Costume Institute Gala at The Metropolitan Museum Of Art - New York , New York , United States - Monday 6th May 2013

Joely Richardson (l-r), Daisy Bevan and Vanessa Redgrave
Joely Richardson, Vanessa Redgrave and Daisy Bevan
Joely Richardson (l-r), Daisy Bevan and Vanessa Redgrave

Vanessa Redgrave - 'PUNK: Chaos to Couture' Costume Institute Gala at The Metropolitan Museum of Art - Arrivals - New York, NY, United States - Tuesday 7th May 2013

Vanessa Redgrave

Vanessa Redgrave - 28th Annual Lucille Lortel Awards - Arrivals - New York, United States - Sunday 5th May 2013

Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave

Jesse Eisenberg and Vanessa Redgrave - Curtain call for the premiere of 'The Revisionist' at the Cherry Lane Theatre - New York City, United States - Thursday 28th February 2013

Jesse Eisenberg and Vanessa Redgrave
Jesse Eisenberg, Vanessa Redgrave and Daniel Oreskes
Jesse Eisenberg, Vanessa Redgrave and Daniel Oreskes
Jesse Eisenberg and Vanessa Redgrave
Jesse Eisenberg and Vanessa Redgrave

Daniel Oreskes, Vanessa Redgrave, Jesse Eisenberg and Kip Fagan - The Revisionist premiere at the Cherry Lane Theatre - Departures - New York, United States - Thursday 28th February 2013

Daniel Oreskes, Vanessa Redgrave, Jesse Eisenberg and Kip Fagan
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Daniel Oreskes and Vanessa Redgrave
Daniel Oreskes, Vanessa Redgrave, Jesse Eisenberg and Kip Fagan
Vanessa Redgrave and Jesse Eisenberg

Emmanuelle Riva and Vanessa Redgrave - Emmanuelle Riva, Vanessa Redgrave New York City, United States The 2013 National Board of Review Awards Gala - Arrivals Tuesday 8th January 2013

Emmanuelle Riva and Vanessa Redgrave
Emmanuelle Riva
Emmanuelle Riva
Emmanuelle Riva and Vanessa Redgrave
Emmanuelle Riva
Emmanuelle Riva

Vanessa Redgrave, Emmanuelle Riva, National Board Of Review and Awards Gala Monday 7th January 2013

Vanessa Redgrave, Emmanuelle Riva, National Board Of Review and Awards Gala

L, Camelot, Vanessa Redgrave, R, Guinevere, Queen Christina and Greta Garbo - L) Camelot - Vanessa Redgrave as Guinevere; (R) Queen Christina - Greta Garbo as Queen Christina Wednesday 17th October 2012 Hollywood Costume - press view held at the Victoria and Albert Museum.

L, Camelot, Vanessa Redgrave, R, Guinevere, Queen Christina and Greta Garbo

Vanessa Redgrave Thursday 4th October 2012 attending the opening of the newly renovated Public Theater at Astor Place

Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave

Guest and Vanessa Redgrave Thursday 19th April 2012 attending the Equality Now 20th Anniversary Fundraiser at the Asia Society

Guest and Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave

The White Countess Review


Very Good
Audiences can expect one thing from the filmmaking team of Ismail Merchant and James Ivory: a Merchant Ivory film isn't meant to be watched, like other movies; it's meant to be visited, like a museum. While the results are sometimes dazzling and rich, and at others times stuffy and inert, the Merchant Ivory approach is nonetheless consistent. Each of their scripts lies somewhere between screenplay and novel. The attention they pay to period detail is lavish. And a Merchant Ivory cast typically reads like a roster of the world's leading thespians. Their most recent effort, The White Countess, is no different.

In it, all the Merchant Ivory hallmarks are present. The stalwart cast is led by Ralph Fiennes and a trio of Redgraves: Vanessa Redgrave, Lynn Redgrave, and Natasha Richardson, Vanessa Redgrave's daughter. The setting -- Shanghai in the period leading up to the Sino-Japanese War of 1937-1945 -- is lush and meticulously rendered. And the script, loosely adapted from Junichiro Tanizaki's novel The Diary of a Mad Old Man, was penned by acclaimed writer Kazuo Ishiguro.

Continue reading: The White Countess Review

Mission: Impossible Review


OK
You heard it here first: When big Mission: Impossible TV fans leave the theater after seeing the film version of their favorite TV show, the most common opinion will be, "I'm pissed off."

Telling you why would spoil what little plot Mission: Impossibleactually has, so I won't. Instead, let me try to shed a little light on what is a messy, uneven production that had so much promise but delivers so little.

Continue reading: Mission: Impossible Review

Murder On The Orient Express Review


Excellent
Classic Agatha Christie becomes a near-classic motion picture, as a dozen major stars are trapped on a snowbound train with what appears to be a killer on the loose. It's up to an absurdly made-up Poirot (Albert Finney) to unmask the murderer of a millionaire in this rich whodunit. Beautifully made and full of good one-liners, Ingred Bergman inexplicably won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar as a relatively forgettable "simple woman." Odd.

The Gathering Storm Review


Very Good
Good TV but still obviously TV. Albert Finney has labored over his doppelganger of Winston Churchill, seen here in the years leading up to WWII, from when no one took him seriously in Parliament to his dominating stint as Prime Minister. I learned a lot about Chuchill in The Gathering Storm, but it still felt a bit like I was taking my medicine. Full of great performances but somehow soulless.

The Pledge Review


Excellent
An early note to parents with young, blonde daughters: Think twice about seeing The Pledge, and if you must go -- if you're eager to see Jack Nicholson give one of his best cinematic performances ever -- then take a Valium before entering the theater and practice saying, "This won't happen to my family! This won't happen to my family!"

From the opening shot, where we see the top of Nicholson's half-bald, hair-transplanted head, The Pledge is an exercise in stomaching an ugly truth. Body parts, pony-tailed girls splotched with blood and bruises -- this isn't a film about happy endings and human triumph. Suspected sex perverts lurk down every road in The Pledge, causing Nicholson's character, a retired homicide detective, so much angst that he becomes his own worst enemy.

Continue reading: The Pledge Review

Cradle Will Rock Review


Very Good
Arguably, one of the best directors of the motion picture industry, Orson Welles was once quoted as saying, "When I die, they'll be picking over my creative bones. The films will suddenly get financing; the films will get restored. Old scripts that we couldn't get financed, they'll find the financing for some kid to direct."

Strangely enough, Welles couldn't have been more prophetic.

Continue reading: Cradle Will Rock Review

Mrs. Dalloway Review


Weak
Proof that period pieces often live up to their reputation as dry, droll, dull, and witless pictures. This retelling of the Virginia Woolf novel is heavy on the voice over, and light on just about everything else. McElhone as the young Mrs. D is mildly interesting... but that's about it.

Blow-Up Review


Weak
The mid- to late-'60s were a heady time for art cinemas in America. While Hollywood was still saddled with content restrictions that forbade nudity, sex, and other bankable cinematic ingredients, less puritanical cultures like those of France, Italy, and Sweden were turning out highbrow features that played to the id and the intellect at the same time. At the art house, America pondered the role of faith in contemporary society, the bankruptcy of emerging cultural mores, the meaning or meaninglessness of life, and the breasts of European starlets. A new galaxy of superstar directors was introduced to audiences, and among its ranks was Italian Michelangelo Antonioni, who burst on the scene in 1960 with an amazing debut, L'Avventura. With a name like his, the proceedings were bound to be a little arty, and indeed the film was an open-ended, nearly plotless examination of the lives of the idle rich. In the films that followed -- especially La Notte and L'Eclisse -- Antonioni's style emerged as one in which characters wandered about, mankind's deepest emotions were rendered merely fashionable, and the lives on the screen were examined with the blankest imaginable gaze. And there was the frank approach to sex, too, and that helped keep audiences coming.

Blow-Up, released in America in 1966, marked a departure. It was filmed in English and in color, and, it aspired to something like a plot: a photographer in swinging London (David Hemmings) uncovers evidence of a possible murder in the background of a series of pictures he's taken of a couple in a park. (De Palma's 1981 Blow Out is an obvious homage: A sound man records evidence of a murder on tape while recording ambient sounds.) Initially he's intrigued, since this event carries so much more gravity than the activities of his daily life, such as photographing models, driving around in a sports car, and off-handedly buying expensive antiques. But as the clues dry up, his interest does too. And having lost interest (after most of the prints are stolen), he simply throws the last print away.

Continue reading: Blow-Up Review

The Seven-Per-Cent Solution Review


Good
It's a silly gag -- Sherlock Holmes is addicted to cocaine and Watson tricks him into a visit with Sigmund Freud. Mysteries real and imagined ensue, with Siggy analyzing our messed-up hero while he investigates a rather tame kidnapping involving a snoozy Vanessa Redgrave. Only Alan Arkin and Robert Duvall -- both bizarrely cast as Freud and Watson, respectively -- make much of an impression. Still, it's quirky enough to have found a cult audience.

Wetherby Review


Good
Enticing setup: Man finagles his way into a dinner party thrown by strangers; no one knows who he is, but they're too polite to kick him out or even ask about his identity. He spends the night, and promptly shoots himself in the head the next morning in the presence of the hostess.

WTF?

Continue reading: Wetherby Review

Girl, Interrupted Review


Good
As near as I can tell, the 60s were about being crazy. Whether it was being crazy while fighting communists in Vietnam, or being crazy while burning bras, or being crazy while marching on Washington, the 60s resounded with insanity. So what better way to tell the story of the 60s than from within the walls of a mental ward known as Claymoore? Hence is the promise given to us in the ads of Girl, Interrupted.

The reality is a bit different.

Continue reading: Girl, Interrupted Review

Wilde Review


Weak
You would think the life of Oscar Wilde would lend itself more to film. Not so. This biopic is unfathomably boring and ultimately pointless.

Searching For Debra Winger Review


Good
It's either sad or interesting or -- something -- when the only man in a movie is Roger Ebert. Rosanna Arquette, tired of hearing that old aphorism that there are no good parts for women in Hollywood, takes up a video camera and records interviews with some three dozen actresses at various ages. (The title invokes Debra Winger's recent retirement and reclusiveness -- though since this film she returned to the cinema.)

Continue reading: Searching For Debra Winger Review

A Month By The Lake Review


Good
Take a base of Enchanted April, a little of Il Postino, maybe some Mediterraneo, throw them together, and what do you get? A mess, to be sure, and I'm guessing it the result is something like A Month By the Lake, John Irvin's new film about two star-crossed lovers who find romance in their "golden years."

Vanessa Redgrave and Edward Fox play the leads of Miss Beaumont and Major Paulo, aging British singles who vacation at a lake in 1937 Italy, just before World War II. The pair soon discover each other: She is a headstrong photographer. He is a crusty businessman who dabbles in sleight-of-hand. Clearly, they are meant for each other, and a love/hate relationship develops on the spot. As the romance progresses, the two abuse and play off each other's insecurities so well, you'd think they really were a couple. When youngsters Miss Bentley (Uma Thurman) and Vittorio enter the picture and complicate matters, the film becomes a game of sly cat and mouse, where you never know who is chasing after whom.

Continue reading: A Month By The Lake Review

Good Boy! Review


Good
Man's best friend: an expression used for ages to describe the relationship between people and their dogs. Rarely has there been a need to question a canine's faith, but after watching Good Boy!, it makes me wonder if what we've been saying for years is right.

Twelve year-old Owen Baker (Liam Aiken) has spent his summer break walking the neighborhood dogs to prove to his parents (Molly Shannon and Kevin Nealon) that he is responsible enough to have a dog of his own. The dog Owen eventually adopts, which he names Hubble, proves to be much smarter than the ordinary canine; Hubble instantly knows how to sit, stay, roll over, and even play dead. Based on his previous training experience, Owen finds this degree of intelligence extremely odd. In search of answers, late one night Owen follows Hubble into the woods near their home; there he sees his new dog communicating with a bright light in the sky.

Continue reading: Good Boy! Review

A Rumor Of Angels Review


OK
Hallmark, where are you? This Vanessa Redgrave film is as overripe as anything Redgrave has made in the last two decades, a sickly sweet something about communicating with angels via Morse code. Redgrave, a half-crazy widow, takes in a troubled and bratty youth (Trevor Morgan), who lost his mother in accident. Together they become the scampiest couple in town, hanging out at her freaky lighthouse. I guess if you're looking for a good cry, A Rumor of Angels has tears galore for you to savor. Not much else, alas.

Lulu On The Bridge Review


OK
Paul Auster (writer of Wayne Wang's Smoke and Blue in the Face) is no stranger to oddball productions. Lulu on the Bridge is another step down the path to David Lynch, with Harvey Keitel as a sax player who gets shot and -- after a miracle recovery that leaves him with one lung -- embarks on an adventure involving Mira Sorvino and a magic rock that glows in the dark. Oh-kayyyyy. It all becomes all-too-apparent what's been going on by the end of this, so after plenty of mood lighting and jazz music, you're released back into the world to completely forget everything you saw. Whatever.

Howards End Review


Excellent
After 35 years of toiling and only one hit to their name (A Room with a View), the directing-producing team of Merchant-Ivory finally hit their stride with Howards End, a work that would become synonymous with their names and the template for their unmistakable style.

Slow, intricate, and deeply symbolic, Howards End ranks among the top films in their oeuvre. It's a history that, if you look at it closely, really amounts to three greats (End, Room, and The Remains of the Day) and a whole lot of nothing-much-else. But that's a subject for another day.

Continue reading: Howards End Review

Prick Up Your Ears Review


Good
You might not even recognize Gary Oldman and Alfred Molina in this little-seen movie about a little-known playright from the 1960s named Joe Orton. Living the high life of a swingin' '60s British homosexual, Orton (Oldman) becomes famous while his older partner Kenneth Halliwell (Molina) does not. Halliwell's reaction to this turn of events is particularly tragic for both. Directed by Stephen Frears, the film unfortunately spends far too much time on the minutiae of Orton's life and takes way too long to build to its inevitable, horrible conclusion.

Girl, Interrupted Review


Weak

Teen angst gets the "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" treatment in "Girl, Interrupted," James Mangold's disappointingly common and commercial follow-up to his earlier, low-budget wonders "Heavy" and "Cop Land."

Poor Winona Ryder -- in her late 20s and still playing teenagers -- stars as 1960s suburban college drop-out Susanna, a compulsive writer stuck in an upscale asylum for a "rest" after mixing booze and a bottle of pain killers.

Borderline Personality Disorder is the maddeningly vague diagnosis of her psychological bugaboos -- the movie seems to want to make a point about our culture's tendency to seek scapegoats for our neuroses -- so Susanna is packed off to a New England psychiatric hospital where, in between the pill dole from the nursing staff, she writes endlessly in her dog-eared journal and fills it with tell-tale drawings the camera can cut to for moments of cheap insight.

Continue reading: Girl, Interrupted Review

The Pledge Review


Weak

Director Sean Penn and star Jack Nicholson must have been drawn to the complexity of the haunted ex-detective character at the center of "The Pledge," because he's just about the only thing at all uncommon in this largely conventional serial killer suspense flick.

Although, even calling him uncommon is a stretch. Reno homicide dick Jerry Black is pretty much an assembly-line character -- a freshly retired cop obsessed with finding the "real killer" in an officially closed murder case that was his last assignment. Having made a promise to the parents of the dead little girl, he's still following hunches on his own time because nobody in the precinct believes him.

Doesn't Jerry sound like a regulation Morgan Freeman character? But with Nicholson in the role, he's a bit more of a wildcard. Big Jack brings an element of instability to Jerry that leaves the audience concerned for his sanity when his ostensive retirement finds him buying a gas station at a High Sierra crossroads as his nest egg because it's at the center of a geographic pattern he's discovered for his suspect.

Continue reading: The Pledge Review

Vanessa Redgrave

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Vanessa Redgrave

Date of birth

30th January, 1937

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Female

Height

1.80


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Vanessa Redgrave Movies

Foxcatcher Movie Review

Foxcatcher Movie Review

Director Bennett Miller continues to skilfully probe around the edges of true stories with this...

Foxcatcher Trailer

Foxcatcher Trailer

Mark Schultz (Channing Tatum) is brought to the Foxcatcher institute by multi-millionaire John du Pont...

Foxcatcher Trailer

Foxcatcher Trailer

John du Pont is a multi-millionaire sports coach who has taken an interest in wrestling,...

Foxcatcher - Clip Trailer

Foxcatcher - Clip Trailer

Mark Schultz is an Olympic Gold Medallist wrestler who is often overlooked as his older...

The Butler Movie Review

The Butler Movie Review

This is an strangely slushy movie from Lee Daniels, whose last two films (Precious and...

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The Butler Trailer

The Butler Trailer

Cecil Gaines is a modest and dedicated butler at the White House who manages to...

The Butler Trailer

The Butler Trailer

Cecil Gains is a devoted White House butler who grew up on a simple cotton...

Song for Marion Movie Review

Song for Marion Movie Review

By focussing on the emotional bleakness in this story, writer-director Williams manages to find some...

Coriolanus Movie Review

Coriolanus Movie Review

Actor-director Fiennes sets Shakespeare's military tragedy in a modern-day war setting, which gives it a...

Coriolanus Trailer

Coriolanus Trailer

Caius Marcus is a brilliant Roman general who is hailed as 'the hero of Rome',...

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