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Vanessa Redgrave - 69th Cannes Film Festival - 'Money Monster' - Premiere at Palais de Festivals, Cannes Film Festival - Cannes, France - Thursday 12th May 2016

Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave

Vanessa Redgrave - Student nurses, junior doctors and their supporters hold a die-in protest outside the Department of Health on London's Whitehall during the first day of the 48 hour Junior Doctors Strike. at Department of Health, Whitehall - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 6th April 2016

Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave

Sally Rogers, Vanessa Redgrave , Guest - The Olivier Awards held at the Royal Opera House - Press Room. - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 3rd April 2016

Sally Rogers, Vanessa Redgrave and Guest

Vanessa Redgrave - Actress Vanessa Redgrave and filmmaker Ken Loach attend a rally at Conway Hall, London in support of the NHS and junior doctors who oppose the imposition of new government contracts. - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 17th February 2016

Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave

Vanessa Redgrave - London Evening Standard British Film Awards at Television Centre - Arrivals at Television Centre - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 7th February 2016

Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave

Dame Vivienne Westwood , Vanessa Redgrave - Junior Doctors Protest, Waterloo Place, London at Waterloo Place - London, United Kingdom - Saturday 6th February 2016

Dame Vivienne Westwood and Vanessa Redgrave
Dame Vivienne Westwood
Dame Vivienne Westwood
Dame Vivienne Westwood and Vanessa Redgrave

Vanessa Redgrave - Vanessa Redgrave and Eric Bana on the set of 'The Secret Scripture' - Dublin, Ireland - Tuesday 24th February 2015

Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave

Venessa Redgrave - Actress Venessa Redgrave seen have a smoke break outside her trailer on the set of The Secret Scripture.Also seen onset was actor Eric Bana. - Dublin, Ireland - Thursday 12th February 2015

Venessa Redgrave
Venessa Redgrave
Venessa Redgrave
Venessa Redgrave

Vanessa Redgrave - Photographs of a variety of stars as they arrived at the Women in Film and Television Awards which were held in London, United Kingdom - Friday 5th December 2014

Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave

The Butler Trailer


Cecil Gains is a devoted White House butler who grew up on a simple cotton farm where he and other black workers were not treated with any respect by their white counterparts. From a simple kitchen worker, he rises to be top butler to eight different presidents over the course of more than 30 years. Sworn to secrecy over the goings on at the White House, he serves the likes of Dwight Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan and Lyndon B. Johnson with all the care that he has in spite of their differing policies and the suppression of his race across the country. He rejects his freedom fighter son's distaste at Cecil's job and never once wavers in his respect for his government. He merely stands back, silver platter in hand and watches the progression of racial equality until the day the country's first black president is finally inaugurated.  

This is a story about loyalty and commitment based on the article by Wil Haygood, 'A Butler Well Served by This Election', about Eugene Allen; a real butler who showed his devotion to his job over the course of three decades while he and his fellow black civilians went from being the underdogs to top dog as he lives to see the election of President Barack Obama. It has been directed by Lee Daniels ('The Paperboy', 'Precious', 'Shadowboxer') and co-written by Danny Strong ('Game Change', 'Recount'), and has an incredible all-star ensemble cast. 'The Butler' is set to his theatres in the US on August 16th 2013.

Click here to read The Butler Movie Review

Song For Marion Review


Good

By focussing on the emotional bleakness in this story, writer-director Williams manages to find some interesting moments in a film that otherwise seems contrived to reach fans of heartwarming fare like The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel and Quartet. And while this film sometimes feels like a geriatric episode of Glee, it at least finds authenticity in the characters' emotions, thanks to clever acting and filmmaking.

It opens with an ageing couple: the perpetually cheery Marion (Redgrave) and her relentless grump of a husband Arthur (Stamp). "You know how I feel about enjoying things," he scowls as she chirps about him coming along to cheer for her singing club at an upcoming competition. But Marion has cancer, and she's trying to make sure that he doesn't shut down when she dies, cutting off contact with his single-dad son (Eccleston). Sure enough, he reacts to her death with cruelty and isolation. But Marion's relentlessly upbeat choir leader Elizabeth (Arterton) won't give up on him, and when she discovers that he can sing, she urges him to take Marion's place at the competition.

After the strikingly original thrillers London to Brighton and Cherry Tree Lane, this is not the kind of film we expect from Williams, but if we look closely we can see him constantly undermining expectations. This film isn't quite as heartwarming as it seems, allowing its characters to be rather startlingly awful at times even though the story is punctuated by uplifting sequences. And of course the veteran cast members are excellent. Redgrave is luminous as Marion, holding the film's emotional centre even after her character is gone. And Stamp quietly reveals a hidden tenderness under Arthur's rough exterior. 

Continue reading: Song For Marion Review

Oscars 2013: Five People ROBBED Of An Academy Award


Tom Hanks Nick Nolte Jack Nicholson Nicolas Cage Michael Caine Vanessa Redgrave Marisa Tomei

We here at Contactmusic.com really hope there's a massive upset at the Oscars on Sunday (February 24, 2013), for no other reason than it's fun to watch the actor who should have won sink into their chair and try and look happy for the surprise recipient, who is dancing in the aisle somewhere. Sometimes, you can pin-point the exact moment when the realisation of absolute failure kicks in. "I lost. I actually lost. I didn't win. Someone else won. I didn't win. I do not need to stand up."

Ok, so it looks unlikely that the 85th Academy Awards will throw up TOO many huge shocks, though should Daniel Day-Lewis miss out on Best Actor, that would certainly represent one of the biggest surprises in Oscar history. Then again, Tom Hanks was nailed on for Saving Private Ryan, and looked what happened there. We thought we'd take a look back at five unbelievable results at the Academy Awards, proving it's not always a done deal.

James Coburn Beats Ed Harris (Academy Awards, 1999)

Continue reading: Oscars 2013: Five People ROBBED Of An Academy Award

Kim Cattrall Returns Home To Play Hollywood Star At The Old Vic


Kim Cattrall Kevin Spacey James Earl Jones Vanessa Redgrave

Sex and the City actress Kim Cattrall is to return to the stage for the Old Vic's forthcoming production of Tennessee Williams' Sweet Bird Of Young. The Liverpool-born actress will play a failing Hollywood star who quits the movie business when her anticipated comeback is a flop, reports the Press Association.

A noted theatre actress, Cattrall appeared as Cleopatra in the Chichester revival of Janet Suzman's production of Antony and Cleopatra last summer. She's spent increasingly more time in the UK since the last Sex and the City movie and told The Independent in June, "After Sex and the City ended I was exhausted and needed time out. My marriage was coming to an end and my job was finished and my father had just been diagnosed with dementia. I thought I just needed to stop...I needed to go home. For me that was England and Canada, and England was where I started working again and I'm so glad I did, I feel replenished and strong. Sometimes you really do need to go home again." The Old Vic's spring schedule is awash with high profile names as artistic director Kevin Spacey steps up his programme at the historic venue. It includes a version of Terence Rattigan's The Winslow Boy as well as Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing with stage legends James Earl Jones and Vanessa Redgrave. "The Old Vic has always been first and foremost an actors' theatre, a home for great talent and memorable performances," said Spacey, "I am delighted to welcome Lindsay Posner back to our theatre with The Winslow Boy and I know that audiences will be thrilled at the prospect of Kim Cattrall taking on Sweet Bird Of Youth directed by Marianne Elliott, whom we are so excited to welcome for the first time."

Currently showing at the Old Vic is the Trevor Nunn directed Kiss Me Kate, with Alex Bourne, David Burt and Adam Garcia. 

Continue reading: Kim Cattrall Returns Home To Play Hollywood Star At The Old Vic

Gemma Arterton Wants To Be A Bond Girl "Forever"


Gemma Arterton Olga Kurylenko Berenice Marlohe Naomie Harris Terence Stamp Vanessa Redgrave

For some people, having a label over your head for the rest of your career would hardly seem like the most appealing thing in the world, however Quantum of Solace star Gemma Arterton has admitted that being labelled a Bond Girl all her life would be something of "an honour."

The 26-year-old Brit actress was speaking to the press at the London Film Festival during the gala screening of her new film Song For Marion when the subject of her time in the last James Bond movie came up. She told the press: ''As long as I'm a girl when I'm 78 as well, I'll be very chuffed about that. I've always seen it as such an honour."

Arterton starred alongside fellow Bond girl Olga Kurylenko in the last Bond outing and in the next Bond film, Skyfall, the famous female roles have been appointed to Bérénice Marlohe and Naomie Harris. Arterton conceded that this year, being the 50th anniversary of the movie franchise, the two actresses may very well have the most enviable roles in the franchise's history.

Continue reading: Gemma Arterton Wants To Be A Bond Girl "Forever"

Coriolanus Review


Good
Actor-director Fiennes sets Shakespeare's military tragedy in a modern-day war setting, which gives it a meaty kick of recognition. But it's such a bombastic film that it's difficult to find much emotional resonance in it.

Amid political and social turmoil, Martius (Fiennes) is a blunt Roman soldier, subduing insurrections in the surrounding kingdoms, making an enemy of Volscian leader Tullus (Butler) but returning home a war hero and crowned Coriolanus.

Despite the help of his military-leader mother (Redgrave), his loyal wife Virgilia (Chastain) and a respected senator (Cox), Martius is unable - and unwilling - to play the political game, insulting both the senate and the public. Banished from public life, he joins with Tullus and sets about conquering Rome his own way.

Continue reading: Coriolanus Review

Coriolanus Trailer


Caius Marcus is a brilliant Roman general who is hailed as 'the hero of Rome', after returning from a war against the Volscians, a neighbouring Italian tribe. Rome wins the war and takes the city of Corioles. In recognition of his part in the war, Caius Marcus is surnamed Coriolanus.

Continue: Coriolanus Trailer

Anonymous Review


OK
Based on the long-mooted Oxfordian theory about the true authorship of Shakespeare's plays and poems, this film undermines its own point by over-egging the story. An over-complicated script and arch performances don't help the case.

In 16th century London Edward (Ifans), Earl of Oxford, has a passion for writing, which is forbidden by the puritan leaders of the day. So he passes his anonymous work to playwright Ben Jonson (Armesto), who allows actor William Shakespeare (Spall) to take the credit. Edward's life is inextricably linked with Queen Elizabeth (Redgrave): they were lovers several years ago (played by Bower and Richardson), and the political fallout is still being controlled by William Cecil (Thewlis) and his son Robert (Hogg).

Continue reading: Anonymous Review

Anonymous Trailer


Edward de Vere is the illegitimate child of Queen Elizabeth I, as well as the Earl of Oxford. In his youth, he wrote a play called A Midsummer Night's Dream but was forbidden from writing anymore from his family, as it was considered taboo.

Continue: Anonymous Trailer

Miral Review


Good
Inventive camerawork and raw performances bring this powerful true story to vivid life. So it's a shame director Schnabel loses his grip in the final act.

It's still an important film, but it lacks the badly needed final gut-punch.

Although born in the 1970s, Miral (Pinto) traces her life back to Israel's partition in 1948, when the young Hind (Abbass) turned her father's home into an orphanage for Palestinian refugees. Three decades later, Miral becomes a student in Hind's school when her father (Siddig) places her there after the death of her mother (Al Massri). Later as a teen, Miral's relationship with her father and Hind are strained when she develops a crush on handsome freedom fighter Hani (Metwally). And she begins to realise that the path to peace is rather complex.

Continue reading: Miral Review

Letters To Juliet Trailer


Sophie is an aspiring writer currently with a lack of inspiration, when she and her fiancé take a trip to one of the most romantic places in the world - Verona, Italy - she thinks it might just give her some direction but she never expected to embark on the journey she does. Sophie finds herself in Juliet's courtyard where she stumbles upon a letter from 1957, the letter is a heartfelt plea for advice. After contemplating what to do with the letter, she finally decides to respond.

Continue: Letters To Juliet Trailer

Franco Nero and Vanessa Redgrave - Franco Nero and Vanessa Redgrave Friday 8th February 2008 at Grosvenor House London, England

Franco Nero and Vanessa Redgrave
Franco Nero
Franco Nero
Vanessa Redgrave and Franco Nero
Franco Nero

Evening Review


Good
Evening enjoys prestigious name recognition. It is based on a novel by Susan Minot, and adapted by Michael Cunningham, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Hours. The movie's cast is Dream Team caliber, from Meryl Streep, Glenn Close, and Vanessa Redgrave to Claire Danes and Toni Collette. And it marks Lajos Koltai's anticipated second film.

Who?

Continue reading: Evening Review

Howards End Review


Excellent
After 35 years of toiling and only one hit to their name (A Room with a View), the directing-producing team of Merchant-Ivory finally hit their stride with Howards End, a work that would become synonymous with their names and the template for their unmistakable style.

Slow, intricate, and deeply symbolic, Howards End ranks among the top films in their oeuvre. It's a history that, if you look at it closely, really amounts to three greats (End, Room, and The Remains of the Day) and a whole lot of nothing-much-else. But that's a subject for another day.

Continue reading: Howards End Review

The White Countess Review


Very Good
Audiences can expect one thing from the filmmaking team of Ismail Merchant and James Ivory: a Merchant Ivory film isn't meant to be watched, like other movies; it's meant to be visited, like a museum. While the results are sometimes dazzling and rich, and at others times stuffy and inert, the Merchant Ivory approach is nonetheless consistent. Each of their scripts lies somewhere between screenplay and novel. The attention they pay to period detail is lavish. And a Merchant Ivory cast typically reads like a roster of the world's leading thespians. Their most recent effort, The White Countess, is no different.

In it, all the Merchant Ivory hallmarks are present. The stalwart cast is led by Ralph Fiennes and a trio of Redgraves: Vanessa Redgrave, Lynn Redgrave, and Natasha Richardson, Vanessa Redgrave's daughter. The setting -- Shanghai in the period leading up to the Sino-Japanese War of 1937-1945 -- is lush and meticulously rendered. And the script, loosely adapted from Junichiro Tanizaki's novel The Diary of a Mad Old Man, was penned by acclaimed writer Kazuo Ishiguro.

Continue reading: The White Countess Review

Venus Review


Excellent
Not since Harold and Maude has there been an intergenerational love connection as intense as this. In Venus, rapidly deteriorating 75-year-old Maurice (Peter O'Toole) is infatuated by the tough-talking 19-year-old country girl Jessie (Jodie Whittaker), the grand-niece of his best friend Ian (Leslie Phillips). When she arrives in London from the sticks to act as a nurse/babysitter for her uncle, she disrupts both of their dusty lives with all sorts of fascinating unintended results.Maurice and Ian are both actors of some renown, and Maurice still works, although he's been reduced mainly to playing dying men and corpses. A quick wit who enjoys a sip of whiskey as he amuses himself with the unpleasant details of his own decline, the sullen (and lovely) Jessie fascinates him. She, of course, is repulsed by both men and is mainly looking for free London lodging and a job "modelin'." She only takes interest in Maurice when he says he can get her a job.The job turns out to be modeling in the nude for an art class, but Jessie reluctantly goes along with it, convinced when Maurice takes her to the National Gallery to look at a particularly beautiful painting of a nude Venus.Though the skittish Ian remains terrified of this new disruptive presence, Maurice, who has always been a ladies man and isn't about to change now, becomes increasingly enamored of her, and she grows fonder of him, although her motives are always in question. What, exactly, Jessie is up to, becomes an important question as she begins to let Maurice kiss her shoulders (only three times) or smell her neck. She also lets him buy her gifts, including a tattoo, and Maurice, for his part, sees himself playing a Henry Higgins sort of role. Can he turn this bumpkin into a lady? A lady who might actually love him?Peter O'Toole takes this excellent opportunity to remind us what an incredible actor he is. It's been decades since he's been given a chance to shine like this, and he blows the doors off in a part that seems to have been custom-made for him. Stripped of all vanity (Maurice even submits to a prostate exam), O'Toole delivers a master class, submitting to lots of invasive close-ups that highlight those inextinguishable blue eyes. His brief scenes with his ex-wife, played by Vanessa Redgrave, should be studied by acting students. They're two geniuses at work. Equally important is Whittaker, who shows no fear as she acts with these legends.Roger Michell and Hanif Kureishi teamed up three years ago on The Mother, another interesting look at age gaps and attractions. Venus is lighter fare and rather more pleasant to watch, but most important, it gives Peter O'Toole an opportunity to do what he does best. One wonders if this may be his last truly grand performance.I'm your Venus, I'm your fire, your desire.

Camelot Review


Good
The King Arthur story got its most audacious telling in Camelot, the primary theatrical inspiration for Monty Python and the Holy Grail, what with all the tights and the singing. The story sticks closely to the Once and Future King archetype, with Arthur (Richard Harris) facing betrayal from Venessa Redgrave's Guinevere (here often "Jenny") and #1 knight Lancelot (Franco Nero). The film really starts to pick up when the evil Modred (David Hemmings) enters the scene, though we're nearly two hours into the three hour opus by that point, and a lot of patience has been lost to the dim imagery and wandering first half.

Little Odessa Review


Good
Little Odessa refers to an old Russian Jewish neighborhood in Brooklyn, New York, along the lines of Little Italy or Chinatown. There, everyone speaks Russian, wanders through bleak snow-covered streets, drinks vodka, wears heavy wool coats...and most carry guns. This is the age of the "organizatsya," the Russian mafia, for whom Joshua (Tim Roth) is employed as a hit man.

Joshua, a long-time Little Odessa expatriate, is called back to the neighborhood to perform a hit on a big shot resident. When he arrives, he encounters his worshipful brother Reuben (Edward Furlong), former lover Alla (Moira Kelly), hateful father Arkady (Maximilian Schell), and dying mother Irina (Vanessa Redgrave). Together, the cast creates a highly dysfunctional family the likes of which you've probably never seen before.

Continue reading: Little Odessa Review

Deep Impact Review


Very Good
I admit it. I'm a sap for the touchy-feely business sometimes.

Deep Impact makes no apologies for being a sob-fest. I mean, how else do you smash a comet into the earth without killing off a few hundred million people, and breaking a few hearts in the process? As the first disaster-from-space film of the year, Deep Impact sets the bar at an interesting level. It's not an action film, although it has action elements. It's not a thriller, although suspense is in the mix. It's more a drama than anything else, the main story lines being a reporter (Téa Leoni) estranged from her father, a young astronomer (Wood) who finds he can't abandon his girlfriend, and a codgery astronaut (Robert Duvall) who gains acceptance among a younger crew.

Continue reading: Deep Impact Review

Beyond The Sea Review


Good

This Bobby Darin biopic reportedly spent about 20 years going through various drafts by many different screenwriters -- including James Toback and Paul Schrader -- before Kevin Spacey grabbed it and made it all his own.

Borrowing more than just a little from Bob Fosse's "All That Jazz," the co-writer, director and star sets his film in a kind of flashback/dream structure in which Darin (Spacey) talks with himself as a little kid. This non-reality also allows for the 45 year-old actor to play Darin, who died at age 37, throughout his career.

Spacey's Darin thinks very highly of himself; when he snatches up teen heartthrob Sandra Dee (Kate Bosworth) as his wife, it feels more like trophy gathering than romance. Yet Spacey's own gigantic hubris fits the part perfectly, and when Darin grouses about not winning the Oscar for "Captain Newman, M.D.," you can feel Spacey going through the same thing. When Spacey sings in Darin's voice, it's an act of supreme ego; he's as sure of his Darin impersonation as he is of his own greatness, and it works.

Continue reading: Beyond The Sea Review

Cradle Will Rock Review


Very Good

A wonderfully ambitious, old-school ensemble piece, very much in the can-do spirit of the community to which it pays homage, "Cradle Will Rock" is a politically-undertoned dramedy about theater, censorship, ambition, apprehension, oppression, Orson Welles and the Great Depression.

Written and directed by Tim Robbins -- never one to shy away from cause-fueled entertainment -- this passionate labor of love celebrates and fictionalizes a legendary moment in American theater, when the government shut down the performance of a musical produced by the Works Progress Administration -- and the actors, at the risk of losing their jobs during the bleakest economic season in U.S. history, staged it anyway in a show of inspiring solidarity.

The play was entitled "The Cradle Will Rock" and its story of a greedy industrialist taken down by the organized working man made a lot of federal bureaucrats see red -- as in communism.

Continue reading: Cradle Will Rock Review

Vanessa Redgrave

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Vanessa Redgrave

Date of birth

30th January, 1937

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Female

Height

1.80


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Vanessa Redgrave Movies

Foxcatcher Movie Review

Foxcatcher Movie Review

Director Bennett Miller continues to skilfully probe around the edges of true stories with this...

Foxcatcher Trailer

Foxcatcher Trailer

Mark Schultz (Channing Tatum) is brought to the Foxcatcher institute by multi-millionaire John du Pont...

Foxcatcher Trailer

Foxcatcher Trailer

John du Pont is a multi-millionaire sports coach who has taken an interest in wrestling,...

Foxcatcher - Clip Trailer

Foxcatcher - Clip Trailer

Mark Schultz is an Olympic Gold Medallist wrestler who is often overlooked as his older...

The Butler Movie Review

The Butler Movie Review

This is an strangely slushy movie from Lee Daniels, whose last two films (Precious and...

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The Butler Trailer

The Butler Trailer

Cecil Gaines is a modest and dedicated butler at the White House who manages to...

The Butler Trailer

The Butler Trailer

Cecil Gains is a devoted White House butler who grew up on a simple cotton...

Song for Marion Movie Review

Song for Marion Movie Review

By focussing on the emotional bleakness in this story, writer-director Williams manages to find some...

Coriolanus Movie Review

Coriolanus Movie Review

Actor-director Fiennes sets Shakespeare's military tragedy in a modern-day war setting, which gives it a...

Coriolanus Trailer

Coriolanus Trailer

Caius Marcus is a brilliant Roman general who is hailed as 'the hero of Rome',...

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