Valerie Perrine

Valerie Perrine

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The Humane Society's 2013 Genesis Awards Benefit Gala

Valerie Perrine - The Humane Society's 2013 Genesis Awards Benefit Gala at The Beverly Hilton Hotel - Arrivals - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Saturday 23rd March 2013

Superman Review


Good
Yeah, it was 1978 when Superman first hit theaters in the version most of us remember -- with Christopher Reeve as the Man of Steel and Marlon Brando as his disco-inspired pop. Superman is a lovable epic full of quaint nostalgia and incredible mysteries of logic (because if the earth spun the other way round, time would apparently reverse... riiiight). The story tells the bulk of the Superman legend -- his escape from Krypton, coming to terms with his powers as a youth in Smallville, moving to big old Metropolis and becoming Clark Kent (and falling for crusty Lois Lane), and dealing with a Lex Luthor (Gene Hackman, excellently over the top) plan to buy up real estate in Nevada and then destroy most of California, thus making his new coastline worth millions. Watch for Terence Stamp's Zod in the first scene -- he'll be back to rule as one of cinema's great villains in Superman II.

Continue reading: Superman Review

Superman II Review


OK
"Kneel before Zod."

Superman II had all the signposts of a disaster. Richard Donner, who shot much of the footage during the production of the first Superman, found himself forced away from the movie and replaced by Richard Lester, who claimed never to have heard of Superman before signing on to the franchise. To top it off, Marlon Brando sued to cut out all his scenes as Jor-El. And Gene Hackman was unavailable to shoot after Lester took the reins.

Continue reading: Superman II Review

Lenny Review


OK
This awkward biopic traces the troubled life of notorious comic Lenny Bruce, as embodied by Dustin Hoffman in a good but still Hoffmanesque performance. Bruce's material is still offensive, out-there, and difficult, but its timeliness (heavy on the evils of racial stereotyping and epithets) is starting to fade. Segregation? The Kennedy assassination? We're talking old school.

Continue reading: Lenny Review

Superman Review


Good
Yeah, it was 1978 when Superman first hit theaters in the version most of us remember -- with Christopher Reeve as the Man of Steel and Marlon Brando as his disco-inspired pop. Superman is a lovable epic full of quaint nostalgia and incredible mysteries of logic (because if the earth spun the other way round, time would apparently reverse). The story tells the bulk of the Superman legend -- his escape from Krypton, coming to terms with his powers as a youth in Smallville, moving to big old Metropolis and becoming Clark Kent (and falling for crusty Lois Lane), and dealing with a Lex Luthor (Gene Hackman, excellently over the top) plan to buy up real estate in Nevada and then destroy most of California, thus making his new coastline worth millions. Watch for Terence Stamp's Zod in the first scene -- he'll be back to rule as one of cinema's great villains in Superman II.

Superman II Review


OK
Superman's sequel is probably as good as the original, thanks to Terence Stamp's inimitable Zod, released (thanks to Superman himself, the big lunk!) on earth with his posse of goons, Ursa (Sarah Douglas) and Non (Jack O'Halloran). This time out, Lois discovers Clark Kent's true nature as the Man of Steel, and his computerized mother convinces Supe to give up his powers in order to marry the gal. Er, great call, Mom. Clark hightails it back to the Fortress to get the powers back, just in time for a duel with the three Zod folks at the end of the movie.

Continue reading: Superman II Review

The Electric Horseman Review


OK
Modern viewers will notice that the beginning of The Last Samurai is identical to that of The Electric Horseman. Though Cruise is a war hero stumping for a rifle company, Redford is a rodeo star now reduced to that of pitchman for a cowboy breakfast cereal, not to mention a dysfunctional drunk. Redford's Sonny finally grows a conscience and a soul, though, when he's asked to perform with a retired race horse on a Las Vegas stage. He promptly horse-naps the stallion, and escapes into the Vegas desert, with reporter girl Jane Fonda hot on his tail (though the cops can't find the guy).The middle is heavy on romance between the two stars -- both megawatt powers in 1979 -- but the central plot, about a stolen horse for God's sake! -- doesn't carry the weight director Sydney Pollack might like us to believe.

What Women Want Review


Good
If you looked like Mel Gibson, being able to read women's minds wouldn't be too imperative. Just give 'em those baby blues and flash those pearly whites, and you're in, baby. Or so you'd think. In What Women Want, directed by relationship comedy veteran Nancy Meyers, Gibson's character gets the real scoop on what the fairer sex thinks about him, and boy, is he in trouble. But his problems are the viewer's fortune.

As all-star Chicago ad man Nick Marshall, Gibson is awash in the stereotypical world of a man's man. Ogling chicks, living high on the hog, and being a major player is his life. He has unending self-confidence just because he can bed babes, but ho, what he doesn't know....

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Slaughterhouse-Five Review


Good
There are certain authors that simply do not lend themselves towards adaptation. The reason for this makes perfect sense: when one reads a book, they are forced by the book to envision the world that the author creates. When one is part of the visual medium of film, the world looks more like reality. Since the world looks more like reality, we are prone to question it in greater detail.

That is why successfully adapting a Vonnegut is one of the Holy Grails of film adaptation.

Continue reading: Slaughterhouse-Five Review

What Women Want Review


Grim

You know how in testosterone-charged action movies an explosion will be shown over and over again in slow motion, and from four or five different angles? The ultimate sign of a guy movie, right?

Well, in "What Women Want" -- a romantic comedy starring Mel Gibson as a man who can hear women's thoughts -- director Nancy Meyers shows, on more than one occasion, Mel passionately kissing Helen Hunt in slow-mo and from four or five different angles.

Yes, what I'm saying is that "What Women Want" is very possibly the chickiest chick flick of all time.

Continue reading: What Women Want Review

Valerie Perrine

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