Trudie Styler

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2015 Tony Awards

Trudie Styler, Sting and Gordon Sumner - 2015 Tony Awards - Red Carpet Arrivals at Tony Awards - Manhattan, New York, United States - Sunday 7th June 2015

Trudie Styler, Sting and Gordon Sumner
Trudie Styler, Sting and Gordon Sumner
Trudie Styler, Sting and Gordon Sumner
Trudie Styler, Sting and Gordon Sumner
Trudie Styler, Sting and Gordon Sumner

Trudie Styler and Sting attend 60th Annual OBIE Awards at Webster Hall on May 18, 2015 in New York City.

Sting, Gordon Sumner and Trudie Styler - 60th Annual OBIE Awards held at Webster Hall - Arrivals at Webster Hall - New York City, New York, United States - Monday 18th May 2015

Sting, Gordon Sumner and Trudie Styler
Sting and Gordon Sumner
Sting, Gordon Sumner and Trudie Styler
Sting and Gordon Sumner
Sting and Gordon Sumner

Women's Brain Health Initiative launch

Trudie Styler - A host of stars were snapped as they arrived to the Women's Brain Health Initiative launch which was held at Urban Zen in New York, United States - Monday 23rd March 2015

Trudie Styler

Women's Brain Health Initiative

Trudie Styler - A host of stars were snapped as they arrived to the Women's Brain Health Initiative launch which was held at Urban Zen in New York, United States - Monday 23rd March 2015

Trudie Styler
Trudie Styler
Trudie Styler

New York premiere of 'Kingsman: The Secret Service'

Trudie Styler - New York premiere of 'Kingsman: The Secret Service' - Arrivals - New York City, New York, United States - Monday 9th February 2015

Trudie Styler

Video - Forest Whitaker Takes Family To 'Black Nativity' NY Premiere - Part 3


'Black Nativity' Forest Whitaker arrived with his wife Keisha Nash Whitaker and daughter Sonnet Whitaker at the movie's New York premiere held at the Apollo Theater. 'Working Girl' actress Melanie Griffith and husband 'Desperado' star Antonio Banderas were also spotted at the event.

Continue: Video - Forest Whitaker Takes Family To 'Black Nativity' NY Premiere - Part 3

Filth Review


Essential

As another full-on Irvine Welsh adaptation Trainspotting did in 1996, this bracingly original movie puts a new filmmaker on the map. Not only is this a loud blast of both style and substance, but it refuses to water down its subject matter, taking us through a shockingly profane story in a way that's both visually inventive and emotionally resonant.

This is the story of Bruce (McAvoy), an Edinburgh detective who's determined to beat his colleagues to a promotion. He's also a relentless womaniser, sexist, racist and drug addict. And he'll do anything to get ahead, hiding the sordid details of his private life from his boss (Sessions) while undermining the other cops at any chance while pretending to be their friends. In quick succession, he gets young Ray (Bell) addicted to cocaine, flirts continually with Amanda (Poots), has a fling with the kinky wife (Dickie) of fellow officer Gus (Lewis), torments Peter (Elliott) about his sexuality, and takes Bladesey (Marsan) on a sex-tourism holiday while making obscene calls to his needy wife (Henderson). All of this happens while Bruce leads the investigation into a grisly murder.

McAvoy dives so far into this role that we barely recognise him in there. Bruce is so amoral that we are taken aback by each degrading moment. And yet McAvoy somehow manages to hold our sympathy due to the film's blackly hilarious tone and a startling undercurrent of real emotion. Even though he's a monster, we see his boyish fragility, especially in surreal sequences involving his therapist (Broadbent), which merge with his fantasies, hallucinations and nightmares. 

Continue reading: Filth Review

Girl Most Likely Review


Good

Even though this comedy has a tendency to dip into cartoonish silliness, it's anchored by a razor-sharp performance by Wiig as a woman forced to confront everything she hates about herself. The film is also packed with hilarious moments that keep us laughing, and it also gets surprisingly sexy and emotional along the way.

Wiig plays Imogene, who has done nothing with her career after winning a rising-star playwright award. Then she loses her day job as a listings editor just as her high-flier boyfriend (Petsos) leaves her. When she fakes a suicide attempt to get some attention, she's court-ordered to move in with her free-spirited mother Zelda (Bening) back home in New Jersey. There she struggles with Zelda's colourful boyfriend George (Dillon), who claims to be a top-secret spy, her goofy-inventor brother Ralph (Fitzgerald) and the smart, sexy and very young lodger Lee (Criss) who rents her old bedroom. But just as she's beginning to cope, a family secret shakes her to the core.

Even as the script strains to be improbably zany, Wiig holds the film together with a startlingly honest comical turn. From the start we knew she didn't fit in with her Manhattan friends, and her slightly out-of-control personality is much more suited to the Jersey Shore. Her scenes with Criss are very nicely played, as they develop an unexpected relationship. By contrast, Bening struggles to appear as dim as Zelda seems to be, while Dillon hams it up as her fantasist toy boy and Fitzgerald's Ralph is so nutty that he seems to be from another movie altogether.

Continue reading: Girl Most Likely Review

Sting And Wife Trudie Styler Receive Recognition For Green Awareness


Sting Trudie Styler

Sting and his wife Trudie Styler have been recognised for their long-running environmental work by being honoured with a 'green Oscar'. The Geordie singer is best known for his work as part of The Police and as a solo singer, whilst his wife Styler is a film producer. However they've long fought for green issues too, and as such will be presented with the International Green Film Award at The Harvard Club in New York by the Cinema for Peace Foundation and the BMZ, Germany's Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development.

The couple have also been granted $3 million (£1.8 million) by BMZ officials for their charity the Rainforest Fund, to continue their global outreach programme. Talking to the BBC, Sting said, "This is very special. This is the green Oscar and it is for our environmental work and the reason we do it is not because we get an award, but we are very happy when we do receive something like this."

Styler added, "It is not only the lovely green Oscar, we are getting a fantastic donation from the German Ministry of $3 million for our environmental work within the foundation for the next three years. It will transform many, many lives and it will make a huge difference in the life of the foundation. We obviously need, in order to go on as an organisation, we need funds to keep it going. We're in 23 countries of three continents, that it a lot of need."


Crude Review


Good
This intense documentary tells a hugely important story that's packed with compelling characters and situations. Although a repetitive structure and a sense of agonising futility conspire to undermine the vital lessons it has to teach us.

Starting in the early 1960s, Texaco began drilling for oil in Ecuador's Amazon rainforest, displacing indigenous groups with polluted rivers and causing health problems for generations. In 1993, the poor residents of this area filed a class-action suit against Texaco (now owned by Chevron), which has been dragging through the courts ever since, delayed by lawyers and Ecuador's political instability. Chevron denies all blame, pointing the finger at PetroEcuador, the nationalised company that assumed ownership of the drilling sites in the 1990s. But human rights activists and lawyers argue otherwise.

Continue reading: Crude Review

Moon Review


Excellent
With a remarkable eye for detail, this low-key sci-fi thriller really gets under the skin as it probes the nature of humanity while keeping us on the edge of our seats. In the near future, Sam (Rockwell) is nearing the end of his three-year stint at a mining station on the dark side of the moon and looking forward to going home to his wife and daughter (McElligott and Scodelario). His only company is the computer Gerty (voiced by Spacey). But after an accident on the lunar surface, he has the surreal experience of meeting himself in the station. Together, the two Sams try to figure out what's going on and what'll happen when the rescue team arrives to find two of them.

The film has heavy shadings of three space classics: 2001, Solaris and Silent Running, both in the way it's designed and in its quiet examination of human nature. When reality starts slipping from his grasp, Sam faces an existential crisis and must figure out who he is regardless of what anyone has told him.

And this is what gives the film its kick, even when the plot itself becomes a bit subtle or vague.

Continue reading: Moon Review

Moon Review


OK
Sam Rockwell plays, ostensibly, the only character in Moon, the debut film from Duncan Jones. His role is that of Sam Bell, a meager laborer at an energy-mining colony on the moon who, lonesome and remote, engineers the extraction of Helium-3, the world's new-fangled energy resource. His only friend: a computer named Gerty which is fitted with emoticons and is voiced by Kevin Spacey. My very real hope is that when all this space craziness becomes real, we make robots and droids a bit livelier than all these HAL scions.

Sam has a wife and a new kid back on Earth and a pair of condescending, endlessly reassuring bosses who send him bits of info every once in awhile. When he runs full-barrel into a harvesting machine and knocks himself unconscious, he awakens with a clear memory of everything up until the accident. Gerty, who has all the dings, scuff marks, and stains one would expect of a workplace droid, shepherds Sam back to working condition like a doting mother but refuses to let him leave the compound. It takes a few days for Sam to outsmart Gerty and get out to the harvester, where he finds an astronaut barely breathing. The helmet is lifted and he finds a clone of himself, bearded and bloodied.

Continue reading: Moon Review

A Guide To Recognizing Your Saints Review


OK
Dito Montiel grew up in an ungentrified Astoria, Queens, in the '80s, running with semi-hoodlums and raising misdemeanor-sized hell. But unlike a lot of teenage thugs-in-training, Montiel escaped his neighborhood to become a writer. His book A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints, unread by me, chronicles his roughneck coming of age; now he has written and directed a film version of the same name. A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints has become Montiel's indie-flavored brand; I look forward to his self-drawn Saints comic book, or maybe a line of handcrafted rough-and-tumble action figures and Astoria playset.

Judging solely from his film, Montiel can actually write, at least as far as authentic dialogue goes. His characters hem and haw and shout at each other, profanities overlapping and cascading yet going nowhere. The scenes of young Dito (Shia LaBeouf), his family, and his friends crammed into his kitchen can be wearying, but also show an expert knowledge of the way the ruts of people's lives can create a jocular yet maddening hardheadedness.

Continue reading: A Guide To Recognizing Your Saints Review

A Guide To Recognizing Your Saints Review


OK
Dito Montiel grew up in an ungentrified Astoria, Queens, in the '80s, running with semi-hoodlums and raising misdemeanor-sized hell. But unlike a lot of teenage thugs-in-training, Montiel escaped his neighborhood to become a writer. His book A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints, unread by me, chronicles his roughneck coming of age; now he has written and directed a film version of the same name. A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints has become Montiel's indie-flavored brand; I look forward to his self-drawn Saints comic book, or maybe a line of handcrafted rough-and-tumble action figures and Astoria playset.

Judging solely from his film, Montiel can actually write, at least as far as authentic dialogue goes. His characters hem and haw and shout at each other, profanities overlapping and cascading yet going nowhere. The scenes of young Dito (Shia LaBeouf), his family, and his friends crammed into his kitchen can be wearying, but also show an expert knowledge of the way the ruts of people's lives can create a jocular yet maddening hardheadedness.

Continue reading: A Guide To Recognizing Your Saints Review

Me Without You Review


Grim
It should have won an award for worst accent ever, as "star" Michelle Williams' faux-Britspeak fades in and out and makes the movie borderline unbearable. The movie itself follows several years in the lives of two London friends (Williams and the far more interesting Anna Friel), who engage in all manner of self-destructive behavior. The film looks a lot more fun for the two girls than it is for us to watch. Very corny and often sappy to boot.
Trudie Styler

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