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Premiere of 'Entourage' - Arrivals

Troy Garity - Warner Bros. Pictures' L.A. Premiere of 'Entourage' held at The Regency Village Theatre - Arrivals at Regency Village Theatre - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 2nd June 2015

Troy Garity
Troy Garity

Premiere of 'Entourage' - Arrivals

Troy Garity - Warner Bros. Pictures' L.A. Premiere of 'Entourage' held at The Regency Village Theatre - Arrivals at The Regency Village Theater, Regency Village Theatre - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 1st June 2015

Troy Garity
Troy Garity
Troy Garity

AFI 42nd Annual Life Achievement Award

Vanessa Vadim, Jane Fonda, Troy Garity and Simone Garity - American Film Institute's (AFI) 42nd Annual Life Achievement Award honoring Jane Fonda at The Dolby Theatre - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 5th June 2014

Barbara Davis, Clive Davis and Jane Fonda
Jane Fonda
Jane Fonda
Barbara Davis, Clive Davis and Jane Fonda
Jane Fonda and Denise Austin

Lee Daniels' The Butler Premiere

Troy Garity - Lee Daniels' The Butler Premiere held at the L.A.Live Regal Cinemas - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Monday 12th August 2013

Troy Garity

Handprint and footprint ceremony honouring actress Jane Fonda

Troy Garity, Jane Fonda, Peter Fonda, Shirlee Fonda and Guests - Handprint and footprint ceremony honouring actress Jane Fonda, presented as part of the '2013 TCM Classic Film Festival' - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Saturday 27th April 2013

Jane Fonda, Peter Fonda, Shirlee Fonda and Troy Garity
Jane Fonda, Peter Fonda, Shirlee Fonda and Troy Garity
Jane Fonda, Peter Fonda, Shirlee Fonda and Troy Garity
Troy Garity, Maria Shriver, Lily Tomlin, Eva Longoria and Viva Vadim
Troy Garity and Lily Tomlin

Lake City Review


Unbearable
Oh Sissy, where art thou?

Cast as The Eternal Earth Mother in Hunter Hill and Perry Moore's Lake City, Sissy Spacek is a one woman universe -- tilling the soil, pushing wheelbarrows, filling the cupboards, sitting on the porch, and staring pensively at the sunset or gazing at the eternal landscape. She is not channeling her characters in Badlands or The River so much as going back to the source -- Linda Arvidson's stoic pioneer women from the old D.W. Griffith two-reelers (all that is missing is waiting for her effeminate husband to reel in the fish). She lives alone and leads a hard life keeping her farm together in rural Virginia and even though local gas station attendant and part-time guitar picker Roy (Keith Carradine) pines for her, Spacek's Maggie Pope keeps to herself and tend to her chores.

Continue reading: Lake City Review

Bandits (2001) Review


Grim
If you start a movie by telling people how it's going to end, well, telling us how it gets there better be one hell of a good time. And to be sure, Bandits begins with its ending, but the story leading up to the dramatic finale is just about as lame as they come.

Doing time for unknown crimes, Joe (Bruce Willis) and Terry (Billy Bob Thornton) are milling about the clink one day when our hunky inmate Joe engineers a daring escape, taking his milquetoast pal Terry along for the ride. Within a few nights on the lam, they've engineered a plan for a new kind of bank robbery -- kidnap the bank manager at his home, spend the night at his house, then waltz in with him first thing in the morning and abscond with all the money.

Continue reading: Bandits (2001) Review

Milwaukee, Minnesota Review


Grim
Director Allan Mindel's debut feature, Milwaukee, Minnesota, doesn't draw you in so much as remind you of movies already seen. The movie, scripted by R.D. Murphy, feels like a soulless mishmash of thriller, melodrama, and love story elements, all of them fastened together by direction that co-opts the styles and sensibilities of contemporary "indie" cinema.

From the outset, the movie bumbles into genre territory inhabited by superior specimens like John Dahl's Red Rock West, Sam Raimi's A Simple Plan, and the Coens' Fargo. Images of wintry fields and desolate small-town streets -- not to mention a moody minimalist score that feels directly indebted to Thomas Newman's music for American Beauty -- puts us in a mind for an existential fable, something those aforementioned movies delivered by way of complex characters nursing pent-up desires and grievances. Mindell and Murphy provide us with a potentially interesting collection of ne'er-do-wells, dreamers, and saps. But their material is too shallow to allow any of their creations to function as more than cogs in the story's clockwork plotting. And, for a movie that references setting in its very title (more for its cultural implications than for geographic accuracy), Milwaukee, Minnesota's sense of place feels as arbitrary as its characterizations, never venturing beyond the stale stereotypes of the provincial Midwest.

Continue reading: Milwaukee, Minnesota Review

Barbershop Review


Good
It seems every "black" ensemble film these days yanks at the same old yarn of bringing back good values to the 'hood - keep your nose clean, love thy neighbor, and treat your woman right. But Barbershop, swelling with the classic Horatio Alger-like "Pull your community up by the bootstraps" message, is populated by surprisingly well-rounded characters and comforting dialogue, managing to be both cliché and refreshingly unusual all in the same breath.

Ice Cube finally puts down the gun and bong (yes, he's doing another Friday movie after this) in his best role since Three Kings. Here he plays Calvin, a soon-to-be father with aspirations for greatness who's inherited his father's struggling barbershop in the south side of Chicago. In a moment of panic, he sells the shop to a local loan shark (Keith David). But soon after, we meet the colorful crew that spend their day at Calvin's: the loony old-timer barber Eddie (Cedric the Entertainer), educated but snotty Jimmy (Sean Patrick Harris), two-strike thug Ricky (Michael Ealy), shy but sweet Dinka (Leonard Howza), pimped out "wigger" Isaac (Troy Garity), and tough girl-done-wrong Terri (hip-hop queen Eve). Spending a good day with these regulars, Calvin starts to realize his mistake, and begins working to set his error straight.

Continue reading: Barbershop Review

Barbershop Review


OK

A modest, personable slice of South Side Chicago life, "Barbershop" is a comedy with a sense of community, populated by three-dimensional personalities that break out of their character molds.

Ice Cube stars as Calvin Palmer, the reluctant inheritor of his family's tonsorial storefront -- a neighborhood staple for 40-plus years which is now losing enough money that Calvin is secretly considering selling. A habitual get-rich-quick schemer, he thinks he'll make a better living setting up a garage-sale-supplied recording studio in his basement.

Facing a possible foreclosure after bank loans don't come through to keep the shop afloat, Calvin is beginning to think a $20,000 buyout offer from a greasy local loan shark (who wants to turn the place into a "gentlemen's club") is sounding pretty good. But over the course of one day in the shop, he finally begins to see why his father and grandfather were so willing to struggle to keep the place alive as a touchstone for their depressed part of town.

Continue reading: Barbershop Review

Steal This Movie Review


OK

A somewhat shallow but certainly fond portrait of one of America's most celebrated anti-establishment folk heroes, "Steal This Movie" pays homage to Abbie Hoffman and his liberal ideals without really exploring what those ideals were all about.

Director Robert Greenwald seems to have made the film less for those who remember Hoffman and more for those who think of him mainly as some cool icon of the '60s.

But actor Vincent D'Onofrio pours so much of his soul into the role of the rambunctious, revered, reviled and persecuted populist agitator that his performance is just enough to forgive the movie for putting its politics on autopilot -- like a TV biography of a "great" politician might -- assuming the audience will take it as red that everything Hoffman stood for was noble and good without going into depth about his philosophies.

Continue reading: Steal This Movie Review

Bandits Review


OK

There's a certain manifold, id-fueled whimsy to Barry Levinson's lighter movies that make them feel like carousel rides for grown-ups. From "Diner" to "Wag the Dog," his pictures are packed with enjoyably idiosyncratic characters, every one of them a frolicsome horse of a different color that from their opening scenes feel like friends (even the amoral ones).

In "Bandits" it's a pair of resourceful serial bank robbers and a maniacally disheartened housewife whom you can't wait to take for a ride.

Conspicuously charming, mannerly Joe Blake (Bruce Willis) and precariously nervous hypochondriac Terry Collins (Billy Bob Thornton) are amusingly winning jailbirds from the moment they spontaneously hijack an unexpectedly accessible cement mixer to bust out of the slammer. You cheer them on as they barrel the rig through back yard fences to evade the cops, and you grin when Joe says, "Ma'am, don't forget your purse" as they carjack a Subaru from a suburbanite.

Continue reading: Bandits Review

Barbershop 2: Back In Business Review


Weak

The pointed, no-taboos banter that was the soul of 2002's surprise hit "Barbershop" gets the short shrift in the entertaining but too-cursory sequel "Barbershop 2: Back in Business."

Similarly funny and socially aware -- the plot this time involves a battle against cavalier gentrification -- this flick once again features Ice Cube (in another sincere and satisfying performance) as shop owner Calvin Palmer, who has grown into a casually strong community pillar, and Cedric the Entertainer, back in fine form as Eddie, the titular tonsorial's controversy-stirring motor-mouthed muckraker.

But the continuing penchant for pointless subplots overtakes this picture's sense of self. "Barbershop" was padded with just one clumsy, slapsticky secondary storyline, about a pair of bungling small-time criminals trying to rid themselves of a stolen ATM machine. But "Barbershop 2" is over-padded with arbitrary, unconvincing sexual tension between reformed angry-thug barber Ricky (Michael Ealy) and reformed spitfire stylist Terri (rapper/actress Eve), and a 1960s backstory for Eddie that, while well written and socially relevant, has no bearing on the present. All this works to the detriment of the ruthlessly funny repartee that was the essence of the original.

Continue reading: Barbershop 2: Back In Business Review

After The Sunset Review


Grim

"After the Sunset" is a heist flick in which the audience is left out of the best part -- the logistics of the heist. Whose dumb idea was that?

Pierce Brosnan and Salma Hayek play an ace diamond-snatching couple who begin the film by pulling off their genre-traditional One Last Big Score, swiping a multi-million-dollar rock from an armored FBI transport -- and that scene is actually crackling with creative how-they-done-it details (unlike the rest of the movie), even if the circumstances themselves make no sense. Why would the FBI be transporting a diamond?

After that, they retire to live a quiet life of sunsets on the beach and piña coladas in a Jamaican resort town. The two talented stars take great joy in giving this criminal couple a sexy playfulness that goes beyond the fact that neither of them wears much once the action shifts to the Caribbean. But almost as soon as Brosnan's old FBI nemesis (Woody Harrelson) turns up -- hoping to lure the thief back into the heist life so the lawman can make the big bust that has always eluded him -- the movie springs a leak and begins a slow and torturous sinking.

Continue reading: After The Sunset Review

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