Tony Kushner

Tony Kushner

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2015 Vineyard Theatre Gala - Arrivals

Tony Kushner - The 2015 Vineyard Theatre Gala at the Edison Hotel Ballroom - Arrivals. at Edison Hotel Ballroom, - New York City, New York, United States - Monday 30th March 2015

Colman Domingo, Michael Mayer and Tony Kushner

Broadway Stands Up For Freedom

Tony Kushner - NYCLU's Broadway Stands Up For Freedom concert held at NYU Skirball Center - Performances - New York City, NY, United States - Monday 22nd July 2013

Tony Kushner

Writers Guild Awards (WGA)

Tony Kushner - Writers Guild Awards (WGA) - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 17th February 2013

Tony Kushner
Tony Kushner
Tony Kushner
Tony Kushner and winner of the Writers Guild Award for Adapted Screenplay
Tony Kushner and winner of the Writers Guild Award for Adapted Screenplay

Writers Guild Awards Press Room

Tony Kushner and Steven Spielberg - Writers Guild Awards Press Room - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 17th February 2013

Tony Kushner and Steven Spielberg
Tony Kushner and Steven Spielberg
Tony Kushner and Steven Spielberg
Tony Kushner and Steven Spielberg
Tony Kushner and Steven Spielberg

Lincoln Review


Excellent

A historic epic from Steven Spielberg carries a lot of baggage, but he surprises us with a remarkably contained approach to an iconic figure. What's most unexpected is that this is a political drama, not a biopic. It's a long, talky movie about back-room deal-making on a very big issue: ending slavery in America. It also has one of the most intelligent, artful scripts of the past year, plus a remarkably wry central performance.

Daniel Day-Lewis constantly grounds Abraham Lincoln in his earthy humanity, good humour and tenacious desire to do the right thing, no matter what it takes. The film essentially covers just one month in which Lincoln works to outlaw slavery before ending four years of civil war. Secretary of State Seward (Strathairn) reluctantly supports this plan, enlisting three shady negotiators (Spader, Nelson and Hawkes) to convince wavering members of Congress to vote in favour of a constitutional amendment. Meanwhile at home, Lincoln is under pressure from his wife Mary (Field) to keep their oldest son Robert (Gordon-Levitt) off the battlefield.

All of this political wrangling makes the film feel like a 19th century version of The West Wing, and Kushner's script crackles with wit, nuance and passion, clearly echoing today's political debates about issues like gun control and human rights. We find ourselves wishing that our own politicians were this creative about getting the votes they need on important issues. This meaty approach gives the cast terrific dialog to bite into, although Spielberg never lets anyone run riot with scenery-chomping antics. The closest is probably Jones, as the fiery anti-slavery supporter Thaddeus Stevens. He's terrific in this role. And Field shines too in as the spiky Mary. Even if she's about a decade too old for the character, she brings intelligence and emotion to every scene.

Continue reading: Lincoln Review

AFI Fest - 'Quartet' - Premiere at the Grauman's Chinese Theatre - Arrivals

Tony Kushner, Camryn Manheim and Grauman's Chinese Theatre - Tony Kushner; Camryn Manheim, Thursday 8th November 2012 AFI Fest - 'Quartet' - Premiere at the Grauman's Chinese Theatre - Arrivals

Munich Review


Excellent
It's been a long, tough road watching Steven Spielberg grow up. Too often, the great Hollywood money machine seemed to flip self-consciously back and forth between his serious work (Schindler's List) and the popcorn flicks (The Lost World, The Terminal). For better or for worse, though, 2005 will be remembered as the year when Spielberg finally and resoundingly merged these twin desires into unified works of serious entertainment, first his stunning War of the Worlds, and now Munich, a less complete piece of work, perhaps, but the most ambitious of Spielberg's career and truly something to behold.

What makes Munich even more ambitious than films like List or even Empire of the Sun is that it's not as recognizable a film as those classically-structured epics. This film is part spy thriller and part meditation on violence but not completely either. The result comes out as somewhat scrambled by the end, with the pieces of about a half-dozen lesser movies mixed around inside, but there's rarely a moment when it's not grabbing you by the collar and demanding your undivided attention. We should have more of this kind of thing.

Continue reading: Munich Review

Angels In America Review


OK
There are times when Mike Nichols' long-awaited HBO adaptation of Tony Kushner's award-riddled Reagan-era AIDS epic play, Angels in America, just about achieves that grand moment of completion that it's been striving for, and the failure to do so is almost heartbreaking. There are numerous reasons why Kushner's play has never been brought to film before, despite serving for many years as the landmark theatrical statement on AIDS in the 1980s - the lyrical counterpoint to the factual reportage of the book and film And the Band Played On - and highest among them is its length. Nichols' version takes the play at its original, somewhat off-putting size, divided up into two three-hour parts, and does pretty much the best with its material that one could ask for; any problems with the finished product are likely Kushner's own.

Part one, "Millennium Approaches" is full of ominous portents, plague and destruction, the rampant spread of AIDS in the chilly clime of '80s conservatism, while the second, "Perestroika" makes the political issues bandied about earlier in the film devastatingly personal. The story runs from 1985 to 1990 and takes in a broad sweep of characters, but not nearly as many as other writers would have packed in, simply to give a broader demographic sampling. Central to the film is Prior Walter (Justin Kirk), a 30-year-old AIDS sufferer whose boyfriend Louis (Ben Shenkman) leaves him in an astonishingly heartless manner, only to take up soon after with recently uncloseted U.S. attorney Joe Pitt (Patrick Wilson). Left mostly to his own devices, with only his friend Belize (Jeffery Wright) to help, as Walter gets sicker, he begins to have visions of an angel (Emma Thompson, odd, arrogant and completely captivating), determined to make him a prophet, claiming that God has deserted the world and that humans are at fault.

Continue reading: Angels In America Review

Tony Kushner

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