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Tony Hale - 22nd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards at The Shrine Expo Hall - Arrivals at Shrine Auditorium, Screen Actors Guild - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 30th January 2016

Tony Hale
Tony Hale
Tony Hale

Tony Hale - 22nd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards at The Shrine Expo Hall - Arrivals at The Shrine Expo Hall, Screen Actors Guild - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 30th January 2016

Tony Hale
Tony Hale
Tony Hale
Tony Hale
Tony Hale
Tony Hale

Tony Hale, Alvin , The Chipmunks - 'Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Road Chip' premiere at the Darryl F. Zanuck Theatre at Zanuck Theater on the Fox Lot - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 12th December 2015

Tony Hale, Alvin and The Chipmunks
Tony Hale
Tony Hale, Alvin and The Chipmunks
Tony Hale, Alvin and The Chipmunks

Tony Hale - 'Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Road Chip' premiere at the Darryl F. Zanuck Theatre at Zanuck Theater at 20th Century Fox Lot - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 12th December 2015

Tony Hale
Tony Hale
Tony Hale
Tony Hale

Tony Hale - 'Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Road Chip' premiere at the Darryl F. Zanuck Theatre at Zanuck Theater on the Fox Lot - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 12th December 2015

Tony Hale
Tony Hale
Tony Hale
Tony Hale
Tony Hale

Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Road Chip - Redfoo Featurette


Redfoo talks about some of the ups and downs of working with three mischievous characters, Simon, Alvin and Theodore. Constant practical jokes and partying can become tiresome even for the likes of Redfoo!

Alvin, Theodore & Simon have spent their lives living with Dave, their adoptive father and they've never been happier. None more so than Dave, who's happily in a relationship - when the three Chipmunks think Dave's about to propose to his partner, they have feelings of doubt as to if they want new step brother who loves nothing more than antagonising the Chipmunks and decide there's nothing left to do but journey to the other side of the country and stop Dave from proposing to his Doctor girlfriend Samantha.

Alvin And The Chipmunks: The Road Chip is released in the UK 12 February 2016.

Tony Hale - Knott's Berry Farm's Countdown To Christmas And Snoopy's Merriest Tree Lighting at Knott's Berry Farm - Buena Park, California, United States - Saturday 5th December 2015

Tony Hale
Tony Hale
Tony Hale
Tony Hale
Tony Hale
Tony Hale

Tony Hale - The Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation 26th Annual Time For Heroes Family Festival - Arrivals at Smashbox Studios - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 25th October 2015

Tony Hale
Tony Hale
Tony Hale
Tony Hale

Tony Hale - HBO's Official 2015 Emmy After Party at Pacific Design Center - West Hollywood, California, United States - Sunday 20th September 2015

Tony Hale
Tony Hale
Tony Hale

Tony Hale - 67th Primetime Emmy Awards - Press Room at Microsoft Theater at LA Live, Primetime Emmy Awards, Emmy Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 21st September 2015

Tony Hale
Tony Hale

Sufe Bradshaw, Matt Walsh, Gary Cole, Sam Richardson, Reid Scott, Kevin Dunn, Timothy Simons, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Tony Hale , Anna Chlumsky - Celebrities arrive at 67th Emmys Press Room at Microsoft Theater. at Microsoft Theatre - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 20th September 2015

Sufe Bradshaw, Matt Walsh, Gary Cole, Sam Richardson, Reid Scott, Kevin Dunn, Timothy Simons, Julia Louis-dreyfus, Tony Hale and Anna Chlumsky
Sufe Bradshaw, Matt Walsh, Gary Cole, Sam Richardson, Reid Scott, Kevin Dunn, Timothy Simons, Julia Louis-dreyfus, Tony Hale and Anna Chlumsky
Sufe Bradshaw, Matt Walsh, Gary Cole, Sam Richardson, Reid Scott, Kevin Dunn, Timothy Simons, Julia Louis-dreyfus, Tony Hale and Anna Chlumsky

Primetime Emmy Awards 2013: How Accurate Were Nomination Predictions?


Emmy Awards Sofia Vergara Kevin Spacey Toby Jones Neil Patrick Harris Maggie Smith Helen Mirren Netflix Paul Aaron Kate Mara Adam Driver Ed O'Neill Bobby Cannavale Mandy Patinkin Jim Carter Al Pacino Peter Dinklage Michael Douglas Matt Damon Anna Gunn Alec Baldwin Matt Le Blanc Jason Bateman Bill Hader Tony Hale Julie Bowen Kerry Washington Claire Danes Connie Britton Jon Hamm Damian Lewis Jeff Daniels Emilia Clarke Christina Hendricks Benedict Cumberbatch Laura Linney Jessica Lange Game Of Thrones

The Primetime Emmy Award nominations were announced yesterday (Thursday 18th July). The nomination ceremony was presented by Kate Mara and Aaron Paul via a live video stream on the Emmy's website. 

Kate Mara
Kate Mara at the Vanity Fair and Juicy Couture's Celebration of 2013 in L.A.

Netflix has managed to triumph with nominations for their shows: House of Cards; Hemlock Grove and Arrested Development. The company are developing this aspect of their business, which is proving hugely popular and profitable. The future does seem bright for the company which announced it was expanding into its 64th country. It also seems likely their awards over the next few years will increase especially with recent praise of Orange is the New Black

Continue reading: Primetime Emmy Awards 2013: How Accurate Were Nomination Predictions?

Tony Hale Talks 'Arrested Development' Season 4


Tony Hale

With the first series of Arrested Development since 2006 set to begin, Tony Hale – who plays Buster – said that the cast have been aware of the huge expectations on them, but insisted they all stepped back into their roles with ease.

Tony Hale
Tony Hale at Monday's Arrested Development premiere

"Coming into it, we knew there were a lot of expectations. And stepping into a character that I haven't done in seven years, you kind of wonder, can I do it again?" he explained to Splitsider, adding of his on-screen mother Lucille, "Let me tell you, once I heard Jessica Walter's voice, it was like a Pavlovian response and I just clicked right back in. It's like her demeaning, abusive, passive aggressive voice, it like clicked right in. And it was just like riding a bike again."

Continue reading: Tony Hale Talks 'Arrested Development' Season 4

The Informant! Review


Excellent
Telling an outrageous true story with humour and irony, Soderbergh crafts an engaging corporate comedy-drama that continually catches us (and the characters) off guard. It's great fun to watch, and has a strongly resonant kick.

Mark Whitacre (Damon) is a high-level executive at ADM, a mega-corporation that supplies corn-related chemicals used in food production. When he notifies his boss (Papa) that the Japanese are plotting to ruin the company, two FBI agents (Bakula and McHale) come to investigate. Then Mark informs them that ADM bosses are involved in a price-fixing scam, offering to work undercover to expose the crimes. Over the next few years, he records key meetings and provides extensive evidence. But something isn't quite right here.

Continue reading: The Informant! Review

Arrested Development: Season Two Review


Essential
Season Two is when Arrested Development transcended simply being television's funniest show and became its very best. Its humor became richer and its savage cultural references became slyer and nastier. If the brilliant comedy's first season was enough to forever classify Arrested as a perennial classic, then its second season established the show as one of the great, edgy arbiters of pop cultural significance. No subject was too sacred to be humorously eviscerated by Arrested Development writers, and no uncomfortable human characteristic too dark to be viciously lampooned by their ever-complicated story arcs.

Arrested Development was always an ingenious cross between crisp satire and loopy human cartoon, but season two hit a stride from the start; the season opener, "The One Where Michael Leaves," picks up exactly where the first season left off, and enriches the already-complicated plot with hysterical new wrinkles. Family patriarch George Bluth Sr. (Jeffrey Tambor) has broken out of prison and escaped to Mexico, while well-adjusted middle son and our nobel hero Michael (Jason Batemen) has made a decision to break from the family entirely. As usual, he keeps getting sucked back in for a variety of reasons: with George Sr. on the lam, Michael must prove his innocence in connection with his father's shady business deal with Saddam Hussein (yes, it just keeps getting deeper), and he would also need money to post bail if he were unfairly arrested. But as complicated as Arrested can get, its themes always remain truly simple -- more than any other reason, Michael returns because his family needs him, and Michael himself has a need to be needed.

Continue reading: Arrested Development: Season Two Review

Arrested Development: Season One Review


Essential
Arrested Development is the defining television comedy of the decade. Its influence can be traced through several of the more popular network comedies that debuted since its sad, premature cancellation, most specifically shows like The Office, My Name is Earl, and especially 30 Rock. Created by the now-cult comedy legend Mitch Hurwitz, the show completely redefined what a "sitcom" could and should be -- shot on a single handheld camera, written as a quasi-documentary with a deadpan narrator (a fabulously matter-of-fact Ron Howard), focusing on a family that is barely likable, and telling stories so ridiculous they strain credibility. Yet the show is oddly endearing -- these characters are so fully actualized and the writing so brilliant that every element of the show works seamlessly.

The series made such a mockery of the traditional, homogenized three-camera sitcom with cheap sets and canned laughter, to the point that very few of them even exist anymore. Most TV comedies now chase after the off-the-wall genius of Arrested Development, with its sly, easy-to-miss references to every aspect of current pop culture, and its uncanny knack for testing the devotion (and the memory banks) of its viewers with severely high-risk inside jokes. The show was a bold concept, a sharply radical turn from the ordinary, and the funniest damn program to appear on television before or since its three-season run.

Continue reading: Arrested Development: Season One Review

Because I Said So Review


Bad
How did we get here? Michael Lehmann's career seemed like one of those no-brainers, destined to slowly pour a mixture of cyanide, ammonia, and pop rocks into the drinking well of modern teen romps and romantic comedies. A debut film tends to state a director's intentions, and Heathers was the sort of debut that said "lock up your prom dresses and get out your garter belts, this ain't gonna be pretty." Somewhere, these intentions were lost like a mentally ill turtle that surprisingly found itself in the toilet bowl.

Heathers sashayed into theaters in 1989 and since then, Lehmann has turned in nothing but guilty pleasures and unfathomable duds. In hindsight, one could have never seen the man behind Hudson Hawk, My Giant, 40 Days and 40 Nights, and The Truth About Cats & Dogs also being responsible for one of the most influential films of the 1980's. But here we are: 18 years after Heathers, Lehmann reduces his talent to a spasmodic headache about... sweet Jesus, you got me.

Continue reading: Because I Said So Review

Stranger Than Fiction (2006) Review


Very Good
For all the talk of Stranger Than Fiction's clever Kaufmanisms, the most honest and sincere part of the film is about as clever as fireworks on the 4th of July. Harold Crick (Will Ferrell) sits at a small table in a local bakery and is coaxed into eating a freshly baked cookie with a glass of milk for dipping. There's a simplicity to the scene that speaks directly to the emotional core of the film, and speaks even more of Ferrell's talents as an actor.

Crick makes his money as an IRS auditor, which means his company is enjoyed on the same level as Beelzebub. Recently, Harold has been hearing his life being narrated to him by an omniscient female voice. This voice, amongst other things, has informed him that he will die and there's nothing he can do about it. In hopes of averting this certain fate, Crick befriends a literature professor (Dustin Hoffman, always welcome) and desperately tries to woo Ana Pascal (Maggie Gyllenhaal), the baker he is currently auditing. It ends up that the voice belongs to a writer named Karen Eiffel (a solid, suicidal Emma Thompson), who seems to have created Harold for her new book Death and Taxes.

Continue reading: Stranger Than Fiction (2006) Review

Stranger Than Fiction (2006) Review


Very Good
For all the talk of Stranger Than Fiction's clever Kaufmanisms, the most honest and sincere part of the film is about as clever as fireworks on the 4th of July. Harold Crick (Will Ferrell) sits at a small table in a local bakery and is coaxed into eating a freshly baked cookie with a glass of milk for dipping. There's a simplicity to the scene that speaks directly to the emotional core of the film, and speaks even more of Ferrell's talents as an actor.

Crick makes his money as an IRS auditor, which means his company is enjoyed on the same level as Beelzebub. Recently, Harold has been hearing his life being narrated to him by an omniscient female voice. This voice, amongst other things, has informed him that he will die and there's nothing he can do about it. In hopes of averting this certain fate, Crick befriends a literature professor (Dustin Hoffman, always welcome) and desperately tries to woo Ana Pascal (Maggie Gyllenhaal), the baker he is currently auditing. It ends up that the voice belongs to a writer named Karen Eiffel (a solid, suicidal Emma Thompson), who seems to have created Harold for her new book Death and Taxes.

Continue reading: Stranger Than Fiction (2006) Review

Arrested Development: Season Three Review


Extraordinary
The only real flaw in the third season of Mitch Hurwitz's flat-out brilliant sitcom Arrested Development is its unfortunate abbreviation. Fox delighted the show's fan base with a surprise pickup at the end of its second season, and then, apparently feeling remorseful about appeasing any segment of its audience not interested in American Idol, took it back, as far as they could; season three runs only 13 episodes, rather than the standard 22. Needless to say, there will be no season four.

Of course, this being Arrested Development and all, there are more laughs in those 13 episodes than a lifetime of just about any another live-action show. Hurwitz's show chronicles the twists and turns of the formerly wealthy, currently imperiled (and morally impaired) Bluth family, led by good son Michael (Jason Bateman). The show moves like a soap opera, cramming an hour's worth of bizarre plots into 20 minutes or so. Season three contains the most ambitious story arc of the show's run, wherein lovelorn Michael finds a new relationship with Rita (guest star Charlize Theron, appearing in five of the baker's dozen), a charming English woman harboring a deep secret. You may guess the twist ahead of the climactic revelation, but even if you do, it's just as much fun to notice the many clues that start to seem hilariously obvious.

Continue reading: Arrested Development: Season Three Review

Stranger Than Fiction Review


Very Good
For all the talk of Stranger Than Fiction's clever Kaufmanisms, the most honest and sincere part of the film is about as clever as fireworks on the 4th of July. Harold Crick (Will Ferrell) sits at a small table in a local bakery and is coaxed into eating a freshly baked cookie with a glass of milk for dipping. There's a simplicity to the scene that speaks directly to the emotional core of the film, and speaks even more of Ferrell's talents as an actor.Crick makes his money as an IRS auditor, which means his company is enjoyed on the same level as Beelzebub. Recently, Harold has been hearing his life being narrated to him by an omniscient female voice. This voice, amongst other things, has informed him that he will die and there's nothing he can do about it. In hopes of averting this certain fate, Crick befriends a literature professor (Dustin Hoffman, always welcome) and desperately tries to woo Ana Pascal (Maggie Gyllenhaal), the baker he is currently auditing. It ends up that the voice belongs to a writer named Karen Eiffel (a solid, suicidal Emma Thompson), who seems to have created Harold for her new book Death and Taxes.Stranger Than Fiction has a weighty proposal. We are asked to see the creation of a piece of art not from the writer's eyes, but rather from the evolving art's eyes itself. Talk about art imitating life. Is it healthier to be distanced from one's work to the point where killing him off is just work, or should one be so in love with the character that the author considers him real? Should a (seemingly) vacuous life be disposed of if it means something great will come with it? These are hefty themes about authorship and writing that writer Zach Helm actually tries to give a definitive answer to. Of course, these are questions that couldn't be answered by an HBO miniseries, let alone a movie that doesn't touch the 120-minute mark.Marc Forster, one of the more fascinating commercial directors to arrive in some time, works with some fresh tricks to make Helm's wildly ambitious script seem plausible. Surprisingly, Forster's technique with actors and his stylistic propensity for fluid camerawork create a bubbly atmosphere that is impossible to resist. The occasionally-overbearing ideas about death and writing can be distracting, but they are used to accentuate the heart of the film: the relationship between Ana and Harold.Gyllenhaal, coming off the melodramatic heft of World Trade Center, has the uncanny ability to shift the tone of her character from voltaic aggression to sublime delicacy without moving the film's own actual tone. She brings an electric current to nearly every scene she's in. Following Jim Carrey's recent transformation, Ferrell dumps the lovable moron shtick for a truly challenging role. Though the themes of Harold's plotline are familiar (live every day to its fullest), Ferrell brings out the joy in Crick with a subtlety that radiates warmth and fragile humor. The scenes between Gyllenhaal and Ferrell are remarkably sweet and ethereal without being overly sentimental. By using complex themes to enunciate the unlikely romance between Crick and Pascal, Forster has found a way to bring out all the quirks and nuances in this love letter wrapped in a Rubik's cube. It feels as natural as milk and cookies."Free Bird"? You got it.
Tony Hale

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Tony Hale

Date of birth

30th September, 1970

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.85




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Tony Hale Movies

Angry Birds Trailer

Angry Birds Trailer

Angry Birds Movie is a screen adaptation from the popular game in which we follow...

Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Road Chip - Redfoo Featurette Trailer

Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Road Chip - Redfoo Featurette Trailer

Redfoo talks about some of the ups and downs of working with three mischievous characters,...

Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Road Chip Trailer

Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Road Chip Trailer

Having literally gone from rags to riches, Alvin, Simon and Theodore didn't think their lives...

Angry Birds Trailer

Angry Birds Trailer

Red lives on a sun-kissed tropical island full of plenty of other vibrant flightless birds....

American Ultra Trailer

American Ultra Trailer

Mike's current life revolves around his girlfriend, a healthy amount of weed and his job...

Alvin And The Chipmunks: The Road Chip Trailer

Alvin And The Chipmunks: The Road Chip Trailer

Alvin, Simon and Theodore are preparing to embark on more mischievous adventures; venturing out on...

The Heat Trailer

The Heat Trailer

Sarah Ashburn is an FBI special agent with an unmatched record for closed cases. However,...

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HappyThankYouMorePlease Trailer

HappyThankYouMorePlease Trailer

It's Sam's 'big day', today is the day he's set to meet with a publishing...

The Informant! Movie Review

The Informant! Movie Review

Telling an outrageous true story with humour and irony, Soderbergh crafts an engaging corporate comedy-drama...

The Informant! Trailer

The Informant! Trailer

Watch the trailer for The Informant! Mark Whitacre is a successful businessman, he works at...

Because I Said So Movie Review

Because I Said So Movie Review

How did we get here? Michael Lehmann's career seemed like one of those no-brainers, destined...

Stranger Than Fiction (2006) Movie Review

Stranger Than Fiction (2006) Movie Review

For all the talk of Stranger Than Fiction's clever Kaufmanisms, the most honest and sincere...

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