Tom Mccarthy

Tom Mccarthy

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Tom McCarthy , Wendy Merry McCarthy - 88th Annual Academy (Oscars) Awards held at Hollywood & Highland Center - Arrivals at Hollywood & Highland Center in Hollywood, Oscars - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 28th February 2016

Tom Mccarthy and Wendy Merry Mccarthy

Tom McCarthy - 2016 Film Independent Spirit Awards held at Santa Monica Beach - Arrivals at Independent Spirit Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 27th February 2016

Tom Mccarthy

Wendy Merry , Tom McCarthy - 2016 Film Independent Spirit Awards held at Santa Monica Beach - Arrivals at anta Monica Beach, Independent Spirit Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 27th February 2016

Wendy Merry and Tom Mccarthy
Wendy Merry and Tom Mccarthy
Wendy Merry and Tom Mccarthy
Wendy Merry and Tom Mccarthy
Tom Mccarthy

Tom McCarthy - EE British Academy Film Awards 2016 (BAFTAs) held at Royal Opera House - Press Room at British Academy Film Awards - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 14th February 2016

Tom Mccarthy
Tom Mccarthy
Cuba Gooding Jr and Tom Mccarthy
Cuba Gooding Jr and Tom Mccarthy

Tom McCarthy , Wendy Merry - 68th Annual Directors Guild Of America Awards at Hyatt Regency Century Plaza - Century City, California, United States - Saturday 6th February 2016

Tom Mccarthy and Wendy Merry

Spotlight Review

Extraordinary

This film demonstrates that you don't need guns to make an exciting thriller. Based on a true story, this is a journalistic procedural following a team of newspaper writers who take on a corrupt system. The outcome is well-known (they won a Pulitzer Prize and launched the global investigation into child abuse by Catholic priests), but the film is still utterly riveting, beautifully written and played to perfection.

In 2001, the Boston Globe's investigative Spotlight team is working to report the biggest stories in the city. So newly arrived senior editor Marty (Liev Schreiber) asks them to find out if there's truth to rumours that the local Catholic Archdiocese is covering up abuse. But he's unaware that the church controls the city, and the Spotlight writers (Michael Keaton, Mark Ruffalo, Rachel McAdams and Brian d'Arcy James) quickly encounter heavy resistance from the establishment. As they persistently dig deeper, they realise that the story is exponentially bigger than anyone thought it was. Two lawyers (Stanley Tucci and Billy Crudup) prove to be crucial in this process, as the team works to prove that the Cardinal (Len Cariou) has been covering up abuse for decades.

Cleverly, writer Josh Singer and writer-director Tom McCarthy never play this story for its salacious details. Instead, they focus on the people involved, which gives the film a strong sense of what's at stake here and the urgency of getting the story exactly right. It's a rare movie that can maintain this balance, gripping the audience and building suspense without ever tipping over into sensationalism. And the filmmakers bring out some strong emotional resonance in sensitive conversations between the journalists and the victims. All of this is expertly played by actors who stir in personal details without letting their characters' side-stories interfere with the larger narrative. They also resist the temptation to overplay the material, letting the facts of the case provide every gut-punch.

Continue reading: Spotlight Review

Spotlight Trailer


Michael Rezendes is a dedicted reporter for the Boston Globe and part of their Spotlight Team; an investigative division focused on justice and whistle-blowing. When accusations of child sex abuse by members of the Catholic Church arise, he leads the team into their latest case, determined to uncover the truth about a morally questionable priest and his scandalous activities across six different parishes over the course of several decades. It is alleged that the church knew what was going on, but chose not to act and hold their reputation above the welfare of their children. Not only that, but past statements from attorneys don't appear to add up and a delicate battle ensues with the government and police all getting involved as the Boston Globe take on the church. There's a large team at the newspaper working on bringing this case into the open once and for all, and they refuse to let these atrocities be swept under the rug another time.

Continue: Spotlight Trailer

Million Dollar Arm Review


Very Good

Based on a true story, this is one of those relentlessly uplifting Disney movies that mixes comedy and emotion to inspire and move the audience. Thankfully, it also has a very smart screenplay by Tom McCarthy (Win Win) that draws out some resonant themes while tackling cross-culture issues with wit and honesty. This makes it easy to identify with the sparky characters who are trying to reinvent themselves.

Sports manager JB (Jon Hamm) certainly needs a reinvention. He has lost all of his high-profile clients and now needs to find the next big thing. Perceived as washed-up, he has some difficulty convincing someone to fund his crazy plan to stage a talent competition in India to find baseball talent among the local cricket players. With the help of his easily distracted assistant Aash (Aasif Mandvi) and cantankerous ex-coach Ray (Alan Arkin), he narrows the candidates down to two potential stars: Rinku and Danesh (Life of Pi's Suraj Sharma and Slumdog Millionaire's Madhur Mittal). After JB brings them back to Los Angeles, along with over-eager interpreter Amit (Pitobash), renegade coach Tom (Bill Paxton) has to whip them into shape to see if they can attract interest from the big-league teams.

While the film continually threatens to indulge in smiley culture-clash slapstick, McCarthy's script continually grounds the action in the characters, who emerge as fully rounded people who are engagingly unpredictable. The cast is earthy and natural, anchored ably by Hamm as a likeable guy who remains self-absorbed even though he's desperate, and who takes a long time to learn his rather simple lesson. His chemistry with Lake Bell (as the plain-talking tenant in his pool house) is superbly messy. And ace scene-stealers Mandvi and Arkin bring plenty of comic relief to their hilarious roles.

Continue reading: Million Dollar Arm Review

The Fields Trailer


It's 1973 and young Steven is having a hard time from problems at his home in Pennsylvania due to his mother and father's tempestuous relationship with each other. In a bid to protect Steven from emotional turmoil and to allow themselves time to rebuild their marriage, his parents send him off to spend time with his grandparents on their farm which he soon finds is no longer a safe haven. In a moment of curiosity, Steven talks a walk into the high, expansive corn field but is given a fright when he discovers the body of a dead woman. He tells his grandparents who don't believe him at first, and he is approached by some unsavoury characters when he is briefly left alone in the car. Soon, the family become the victims of some terrifying disturbances at their home caused by some hidden perpetrators that use the corn fields as a hiding place and Steven begins to realise that he has less to fear from the dead than the living.

Continue: The Fields Trailer

Win Win Review


Excellent
As with The Station Agent and The Visitor, McCarthy creates a series of encounters for some astonishingly vivid characters, and the result is an entertaining film that challenges prejudice. It's also both funny and moving.

Mike (Giamatti) is a New Jersey lawyer struggling to make ends meet when he discovers he can earn a bit extra as the guardian of senile client Leo (Young).

But his wife Jackie (Ryan) only finds out when Leo's 16-year-old grandson Kyle (Shaffer) turns up needing a place to stay while his mother (Lynskey) goes through rehab. To keep him busy, Mike invites Kyle along to the wrestling practice he coaches with his friends (Tambor and Cannavale). Surprise: Kyle's a gifted wrestler who may help the team win for a change.

Continue reading: Win Win Review

Little Fockers Review


Weak
While this second sequel to Meet the Parents features the same comedy of embarrassment and vulgarity as its predecessors, it also takes a strange sideways step into machismo that leaves it feeling rather joyless.

As their twins (Daisy Tahan and Colin Baiocchi) are about to turn 5, Greg and Pam Focker (Stiller and Polo) are planning a big birthday party involving both of their sets of parents. While Pam's intense dad Jack (De Niro) is pressuring Greg to be a family leader, her mom (Danner) tries to keep the peace.

Meanwhile, Greg's parents (Streisand and Hoffman) are on separate quests of their own. But it's Pam's ex Kevin (Wilson) who really stirs things up. As does a drug rep (Alba) who gets a bit too close to Greg.

Continue reading: Little Fockers Review

Mammoth Review


Very Good
Darkly honest and emotionally involving, this ensemble drama cleverly examines the impact of modern life on children through several distinctly different characters. It's not particularly original, but it's still gripping.

In New York, gaming expert Leo (Garcia Bernal) is happily married to surgeon Ellen (Williams). While they work, their young daughter Jackie (Nyweide) is tended to by their Filipina nanny Gloria (Necesito), who's working to raise money to help her two young sons (Nicdao and Delos Santos) back home. Leo's latest business trip takes him to Thailand, where he has some time to kill waiting for his business partner (McCarthy) to make a deal, so he heads to a remote beach, where be befriends a lively young hooker (Srinikornchot).

Continue reading: Mammoth Review

2012 Review


Excellent
Gleefully over-the-top, this film takes the disaster movie pretty much as far as it can go, drawing on the Mayan prophecy that he world will end on 21 December 2012. Emmerich deploys all the genre elements (solid cast, detailed back-stories, gigantic set pieces) to give us a raucously enjoyable ride.

While on a camping trip in Yellowstone, novelist-turned-chauffer Jackson (Cusack) stumbles across a secret military operation and a raving nutcase (Harrelson) who claims the end of the world is nigh. Sure enough, top government scientist Adrian (Ejiofor) is advising the President (Glover) and his Chief of Staff (Platt) about preparations for impending natural catastrophes. By the time Jackson gets home to Los Angeles, the pandemonium has begun, and he barely gets his kids, his ex (Peet) and her new husband (McCarthy) out. But where do they go now?

Continue reading: 2012 Review

Good Night, And Good Luck Review


Excellent
One doesn't need much more of a reason to go to the movies than this: Edward R. Murrow taking on Senator Joe McCarthy (at the height of his power), crisp black-and-white cinematography, the clink of ice cubes over scotch, voluptuous clouds of cigarette smoke hanging in the air, a nation's conscience dangling in the balance. So it is with George Clooney's Good Night, and Good Luck, a film where the mood - just shy of too cool for its own good - sets the scene for Murrow, the patron saint of journalism, to cajole and castigate the audience in a time of complacency. It also has a great jazz soundtrack.

The story of the witch-hunt has endlessly retold, usually laden with the same self-satisfied 20/20 hindsight that afflicts stories of the civil rights movement, and fortunately Clooney and co-writer Grant Heslov see no need to go through it all again. With admirable precision, they've sliced away most all the accoutrements often used to open up the era for the modern viewer, ala Quiz Show. This is a film that takes place almost entirely inside a CBS studio and newsroom, with occasional trips to hallways, elevators, and a network executive's wood-paneled office. Once, they all go out to a bar. It's best in the studio, because that's where we find Murrow - incarnated with almost indecent accuracy by David Strathairn - looking and sounding like as though Rod Serling had decided to rejoin the human race, his manner clipped and astringent, cigarette cocked in one hand like a talisman warding off evil.

Continue reading: Good Night, And Good Luck Review

The Station Agent Review


Very Good
Meet Finbar McBride. Besides having a cool name, Finbar's (Peter Dinklage) most noticeable attribute is that he is a dwarf who stands about 4-foot-5. And he's bitter about this. As a result, he is a laconic fellow who keeps to himself and has no friends. But he does have a passion for trains. One day Fin's work colleague dies and leaves him a train depot in New Jersey as an inheritance. Fin - who apparently has nothing else to do in his life - packs up his suitcase, walks many miles (on the train tracks) into New Jersey, and sets up his new home inside the run-down depot.

Right from the beginning we are brought into the leisurely pace of Fin's ascetic life. He doesn't eat or drink much, he spends his days studying old trains or reading about them, and he walks almost everywhere because he can't drive and he doesn't like crowded buses or trains. And it's pretty obvious why; every time he gets around people they stare at him and make comments.

Continue reading: The Station Agent Review

Tom Mccarthy

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Tom McCarthy Movies

Spotlight Movie Review

Spotlight Movie Review

This film demonstrates that you don't need guns to make an exciting thriller. Based on...

Spotlight Trailer

Spotlight Trailer

Michael Rezendes is a dedicted reporter for the Boston Globe and part of their Spotlight...

Million Dollar Arm Movie Review

Million Dollar Arm Movie Review

Based on a true story, this is one of those relentlessly uplifting Disney movies that...

The Fields Trailer

The Fields Trailer

It's 1973 and young Steven is having a hard time from problems at his home...

Win Win Movie Review

Win Win Movie Review

As with The Station Agent and The Visitor, McCarthy creates a series of encounters for...

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Little Fockers Movie Review

Little Fockers Movie Review

While this second sequel to Meet the Parents features the same comedy of embarrassment and...

Mammoth Movie Review

Mammoth Movie Review

Darkly honest and emotionally involving, this ensemble drama cleverly examines the impact of modern life...

Good Night, and Good Luck Movie Review

Good Night, and Good Luck Movie Review

One doesn't need much more of a reason to go to the movies than this:...

The Station Agent Movie Review

The Station Agent Movie Review

Meet Finbar McBride. Besides having a cool name, Finbar's (Peter Dinklage) most noticeable attribute is...

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