Tom Hollander Page 3

Tom Hollander

Tom Hollander Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Comments Quotes RSS

Tom Hollander - The House of Fraser British Academy Television Awards 2015 held at Theatre Royal, Drury Lane - Arrivals at Theatre Royal, Drury Lane - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 10th May 2015

Tom Hollander

Tom Hollander - Celebrities at the BBC Broadcasting House, Election Coverage. - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 6th May 2015

Tom Hollander
Tom Hollander
Tom Hollander

Tom Hollander - A variety of stars were snapped as they arrived at the BBC Films 25th Anniversary Reception which was held at BBC Broadcasting House in London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 25th March 2015

Tom Hollander

Tom Hollander - Actor Tom Hollander pictured at Radio 2 - London, United Kingdom - Monday 24th March 2014

Tom Hollander
Tom Hollander

Olivia Colman and Tom Hollander - Olivia Colman and Tom Hollander film scenes for the third series of the award-winning BBC2 comedy 'Rev', in London - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 12th November 2013

Olivia Colman and Tom Hollander
Olivia Colman and Tom Hollander
Olivia Colman and Tom Hollander
Olivia Colman and Tom Hollander
Olivia Colman and Tom Hollander
Olivia Colman and Tom Hollander

Tom Hollander - Tom Hollander attends the BFI London Film Festival Gala European Premiere of "The Invisible Woman" at the Odeon Leicester Squar - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 15th October 2013

Tom Hollander
Tom Hollander
Tom Hollander
Tom Hollander
Tom Hollander

Tom Hollander - The BFI Luminous gala dinner & auction held at 8 Northumberland Avenue - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 8th October 2013

Tom Hollander
Tom Hollander
Tom Hollander

Tom Hollander - Celebrities enjoy a night out in Central London - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 3rd July 2013

Tom Hollander and Olivia Colman - Tom Hollander and Olivia Colman Friday 30th March 2012 38th Annual Broadcasting Press Guild Awards 2012 held at the Theatre Royal Drury Lane - Arrivals

Tom Hollander and Olivia Colman
Tom Hollander and Olivia Colman
Tom Hollander
Tom Hollander

Tom Hollander - Sunday 22nd May 2011 at British Academy Television Awards London, England

Tom Hollander
Tom Hollander
Tom Hollander

Hanna Review


Very Good
Pacey and offbeat, this cat-and-mouse film keeps us on our toes by layering the action thriller with fairy tale parallels. And the cast is strong enough to keep us engaged even when the plot skips over some glaring implausibilities.

Hanna (Ronan) has spent her entire life deep in the snowy woods, where her ex-spy dad (Bana) has raised her to be the ultimate super-agent. Now 16, she's ready to face up to her wicked nemesis Marissa (Blanchett), the agent who killed her mother. But Marissa has caught her trail, and as they chase each other Marissa calls in a ruthless German henchman (Hollander) for help.

Meanwhile, Hanna hides out with a sparky British teen (Barden) whose hippie parents (Williams and Flemyng) have no idea what's going on.

Continue reading: Hanna Review

Tom Hollander Thursday 17th March 2011 The Surrealist Ball in aid of NSPCC at The Banqueting House - Departures London, England

Tom Hollander

Tom Hollander - Tuesday 1st February 2011 at ITV Studios London, England

Tom Hollander
Tom Hollander
Tom Hollander
Tom Hollander
Tom Hollander

Ralph Fiennes and Tom Hollander, Ralph Fiennes, A-Team and Tom Hollander Tuesday 27th July 2010 The UK premiere of The A-Team London, England

Ralph Fiennes And Tom Hollander, Ralph Fiennes, A-team and Tom Hollander
Ralph Fiennes and A-team
Ralph Fiennes and A-team

In The Loop Review


Extraordinary
Frankly, it's a stroke of genius to play a tense political thriller as if it's a raucous satire. Slicing straight through any over-seriousness, this film keeps us laughing loudly as it tells a story that's probably far truer than we'd like to believe.

Malcolm Tucker (Capaldi) is the acerbic communications director for Britain's Prime Minister, and right now he has to put out a fire started by Cabinet Minister Foster (Hollander), who called war in the Middle East "unforeseeable" in a radio interview. Foster's aides (Addison and McKee) are working to keep him on the crest of a tidal wave of attention after some American politicians (Kennedy and Rasche) take an interest in him. In Washington they also meet a tough Pentagon General (Gandolfini), while unseen forces seem determined to rush to war.

Continue reading: In The Loop Review

The Soloist Review


Good
Joe Wright's worlds-colliding drama The Soloist has so many strikes against it that it's hard to imagine coming out the other end feeling anything but relief that it was over. Think of it: a based-on-a-true-story about a cold-hearted journalist who meets a mentally disturbed homeless man who just happens to be a world-class musician. Together, the two strike up a unique friendship against the backdrop of Los Angeles's Dickensian skid row and imploding newspaper industry; a bright flower blooming from the crack in a downtown sidewalk. Also, one of the men happens to be black and the other white.

On paper, the treacle-meter for The Soloist is nearly off the charts. But while Wright (Atonement) hasn't fashioned anything like a classic, and the screenplay by Susannah Grant (Erin Brockovich) is frequently thin on motivation, the film is not even close to the disaster that it should have been. This is higher praise than it may sound.

Continue reading: The Soloist Review

Tom Hollander Wednesday 1st April 2009 Special Screening of 'In The Loop' held at the Curzon Mayfair - Arrivals London, England

Tom Hollander

Valkyrie Trailer


This amazing true story is based around the life of Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg, a German officer who, along with a group of high ranking officers decide something must be done about Hitler before all of Germany is destroyed by war. 

Continue: Valkyrie Trailer

Tom Hollander - Tuesday 9th September 2008 at Serpentine Gallery London, England

Tom Hollander

The Darwin Awards Review


Good
Poor Finn Taylor can't catch a break. By all reports he's the nicest guy in the world, and he typically toils for three or four years on each indie flick he directs. When they finally hit the screen they flop. His last outing, Cherish, was a bizarre story about a cop falling in love with a girl under house arrest who he's assigned to watch. I guess it wasn't bizarre enough, though. I had to reread my review of it just to fully remember what it was about. Cherish bombed with a $180,000 gross.

Four years later, Taylor drops another oddball flick on us, and the trouble is obvious before frame one. For starters, the name of the movie is The Darwin Awards, which sounds like it's going to be a documentary about those nutty people who kill themselves doing stupid things, thus earning posthumous "Darwin Awards" (as written up in a series of books of the same name) for ridding the gene pool of their DNA.

Continue reading: The Darwin Awards Review

Pride & Prejudice (2005) Review


Very Good
English students of the world rejoice - another reason not to read Jane Austen. Joe Wright's latest incarnation of Austen's classic Pride & Prejudice is a mostly blissful time-traveling bus tour through a giggly and gorgeous English countryside. To your left note the lovely ladies Bennet, all sideways glances, blushing cheeks and innuendo. To your right, lenses at the ready for the dapper, tall, dark, and handsome objects of their affection, Darcy, Bingley, and Wickham! Swoon... Watch them as they play and woo, mismanage and miscarry, repress and reveal. This flighty matrimonial preamble is the pleasure of Wright's adaptation, briskly played in balls and manors. When at its playful best, it dances lightly with humor and delight. However, the film's occasional missteps, rhythm-less moves into the shadows of darker and more serious emotional territory, threaten to sink rather than anchor Wright's film with any of the depth they intend to provide.

For those who are unaware of Austen's novel (it might be helpful to consider that The Lion King is to Hamlet as Bridget Jones' Diary is to Pride & Prejudice), Pride & Prejudice is the story of the Bennet sisters, and particularly, second eldest child Elizabeth (Keira Knightley). These desperate housewives-to-be are in dire pursuit of a man. For the younger girls, and Elizabeth's squawking mother (a superbly erratic Brenda Blethyn), a man's greatest endowment is his wallet. However, for Elizabeth and oldest sister Jane (Rosamund Pike) love is the only currency in which they wish to deal. Convenient then that the objects of their affections, Mr. Bingley (Simon Woods) for Jane, and the infamously standoffish Mr. Darcy (Matthew MacFadyen) for Elizabeth, are moneyed up to the kilt when they ride into town to stir trouble and steal hearts. Elizabeth's very cinematic blindness to Darcy's very British advance is the centerpiece of both novel and film, with all suspense drawn from the "will they or won't they" dilemma.

Continue reading: Pride & Prejudice (2005) Review

Bedrooms & Hallways Review


Bad
This limp comedy about sexual ambiguity among a group of British men who form a "men's group" together lost my interest inside of 10 minutes. It tries to be hip and clever, and on a few rare occasions it manages to actually be funny. But mostly -- as is commonly the case with would-be message movies like this -- it's blah blah blah for an hour and a half, with the audience longing for the credits to roll.

Land Of The Blind Review


Terrible
Not to be bested by Quills and Geoffrey Rush, Land of the Blind had the bright idea to have a scene where Donald Sutherland writes in his own excrement. To do one better, you see the feces plunked down right there in Sutherland's hand. Was this where Sutherland saw his career going? Was he just winding up his pitch with Klute, Don't Look Now, and last year's stellar take on Pride & Prejudice? Was it all really just to get to the point where he could write jibber-jabber about freedom and anarchy in his own poop? Please, Donny, say it ain't so.Sutherland plays Thorne, an imprisoned playwright whose writings have been deemed too inflammatory. The world he lives in is run by a dictator (Tom Hollander) who casts Hollywood actors as news anchors and makes movies that resemble DV versions of Jerry Bruckheimer films. It isn't until a soldier, Joe (Ralph Fiennes), starts listening to Thorne's articulate ramblings that things start happening. Joe busts Thorne out of prison and allows him to exact revenge on the dictator and his wife (a useless Lara Flynn Boyle). The ink is still wet on the new constitution when Thorne becomes a dictator too, sending his friend Joe to the torture chambers for not agreeing with his new regime.Is this what we have stooped to for leftist political films? Robert Edwards' film for one reason or another really thinks it's saying something. It punctuates the cruelty of both the left and the ultra right with equal measures, but it never really shows examples of what is good in either ideology. It highlights the "everyman" as hero, but never sees Fiennes' character as anything besides an ideology that is up for bid. The fact that Edwards fits Joe with a family is absolutely absurd because we don't care about Joe as a character; he is simply there for us to see the effect that politics have on a normal person. It's hollow and criminally indecisive.If anything, you can say that Land of the Blind has excessive, somewhat stylish design production. The castle that the dictator lives in resembles the excessive architecture of some palace in Barcelona. However, this gentle stab at stylizing brings to mind that Edwards was trying to do what none have succeeded at: attempt to follow up Terry Gilliam's Brazil. Not even Gilliam himself, who has made successful, even great films like The Fisher King and Twelve Monkeys, has ever been able to bring his style and politics to such a fantastic torrent. It's possible to see where Edwards' heart might have been in the right place, but his film is too clever, too cold, and too completely self-aware to ever really embrace an everyman like Joe.Hey, Donny, Altman is still making movies, so is Roeg. You have options.

Pride & Prejudice Review


Very Good
English students of the world rejoice - another reason not to read Jane Austen. Joe Wright's latest incarnation of Austen's classic Pride & Prejudice is a mostly blissful time-traveling bus tour through a giggly and gorgeous English countryside. To your left note the lovely ladies Bennet, all sideways glances, blushing cheeks and innuendo. To your right, lenses at the ready for the dapper, tall, dark, and handsome objects of their affection, Darcy, Bingley, and Wickham! Swoon... Watch them as they play and woo, mismanage and miscarry, repress and reveal. This flighty matrimonial preamble is the pleasure of Wright's adaptation, briskly played in balls and manors. When at its playful best, it dances lightly with humor and delight. However, the film's occasional missteps, rhythm-less moves into the shadows of darker and more serious emotional territory, threaten to sink rather than anchor Wright's film with any of the depth they intend to provide.

For those who are unaware of Austen's novel (it might be helpful to consider that The Lion King is to Hamlet as Bridget Jones' Diary is to Pride & Prejudice), Pride & Prejudice is the story of the Bennet sisters, and particularly, second eldest child Elizabeth (Keira Knightley). These desperate housewives-to-be are in dire pursuit of a man. For the younger girls, and Elizabeth's squawking mother (a superbly erratic Brenda Blethyn), a man's greatest endowment is his wallet. However, for Elizabeth and oldest sister Jane (Rosamund Pike) love is the only currency in which they wish to deal. Convenient then that the objects of their affections, Mr. Bingley (Simon Woods) for Jane, and the infamously standoffish Mr. Darcy (Matthew MacFadyen) for Elizabeth, are moneyed up to the kilt when they ride into town to stir trouble and steal hearts. Elizabeth's very cinematic blindness to Darcy's very British advance is the centerpiece of both novel and film, with all suspense drawn from the "will they or won't they" dilemma.

Continue reading: Pride & Prejudice Review

Bedrooms & Hallways Review


Bad
This limp comedy about sexual ambiguity among a group of British men who form a "men's group" together lost my interest inside of 10 minutes. It tries to be hip and clever, and on a few rare occasions it manages to actually be funny. But mostly -- as is commonly the case with would-be message movies like this -- it's blah blah blah for an hour and a half, with the audience longing for the credits to roll.

Gosford Park Review


Good
If Robert Altman had been given The Remains of the Day, the end product might have looked something like this.

Gosford Park is the name of an English country estate, where, in 1932, a gaggle of royals and wannabes -- including a horde of locals plus a popular British actor and a Charlie Chan-obsessed Hollywood movie producer -- gather to attend a weekend hunting party. Upstairs, it's the usual hoity-toity, drawing room chitter-chatter, while downstairs an army of servants does little but gossip about the visitors above.

Continue reading: Gosford Park Review

The Very Thought Of You Review


Very Good
Nearly overwhelming in its cuteness, The Very Thought of You tells the wholly unlikely story of an American (Potter) on the run from her unbearably dull life. When she flies to London on a lark, she encounters three British guys in the space of 48 hours, all of whom fall in love with her immediately. The catch? The three are all best friends.

Joseph Fiennes is the lovable one of the bunch, and naturally he and Potter are destined for one another. But Fiennes' friendship with his two pals (Sewell and Hollander) keeps him a dark horse in the game. Will he go for the girl or not? And what will she do when she finds out they're all pals?

Continue reading: The Very Thought Of You Review

Bedrooms & Hallways Review


Good

Gay guys whining about their complicated sex lives may be wearing a bit thin as a staple for alternative romantic comedies, but "Bedrooms and Hallways" gives this retread genre a good, swift kick in the pants.

A light, soap-operatic satire of shifting sexual orientation from Rose Troche, the director of "Go Fish," this Brit import has been a buzz flick at Gay and Lesbian film festivals all year long for its steady supply of laughs, its exploration of sexual identity and its somewhat surprising last act.

Kevin McKidd ("Trainspotting") stars as Leo, a reserved, romantically frustrated 30-year-old whose surprise birthday party, which opens the film, quickly becomes an fusion of all the entanglements in his life.

Continue reading: Bedrooms & Hallways Review

Gosford Park Review


Very Good

You may need a program to keep track of the two dozen-plus characters in Robert Altman's soap opera, murder mystery, chamber comedy-of-manners "Gosford Park."

Carpeted with dry wit and filled to the rafters with salacious secrets and unspoken animosity, the film takes place at an English country estate in 1932 and unfolds from two points of view -- above stairs, where a multitude of aristocrats size each other up in subtle sociological war games, and below stairs, where their gossipy maids and valets fall into a strict pecking order based upon whom they serve.

The estate is the home of the aloof upper-crusters Sir William and Lady Sylvia McCordle (Michael Gambon and Kristin Scott Thomas) and it's gathering place for their many coattail-riding relatives, including Aunt Constance (the wonderful, quizzically austere Maggie Smith) who habitually puts on airs as if she's not living off an allowance from the McCordles.

Continue reading: Gosford Park Review

Enigma Review


Good

An intensely intellectual and emotional World War II spy story about British codebreakers, Michael Apted's "Enigma" requires a viewer's complete focus to follow its intricate, twist-packed story of intrigue, obsession and romance. But those who keep up will find the plot rewards your intelligence, the performances are extraordinary and the characters engrossingly mysterious.

The film takes place almost entirely at Bletchley Park -- England's massive, top secret base for intercepting and deciphering Nazi radio traffic -- in the days leading up to a German U-boat attack on a massive Allied convoy in 1943.

Dougray Scott ("Mission Impossible 2," "Ever After") stars as Tom Jericho, a code-cracking mathematician who was "pulled out of Cambridge of the first day of the war and worked to the breaking point." As the film begins, the man is a haggard, unshaven wreck who has been dragged back into the fold by bosses who hate him because they need him desperately. The Germans have switched codes and as a result the British have lost track of the largest submarine wolf pack they've ever encountered.

Continue reading: Enigma Review

Stage Beauty Review


Weak

A Renaissance drama set during the last days of men playing women in the English theater, "Stage Beauty" is peculiarly out of sync with its own narrative.

Akin to "Shakespeare in Love" and "Girl With a Pearl Earring" in fictionalizing real historical figures, the film stars Billy Crudup ("Almost Famous," "Big Fish") as Ned Kynaston, an acclaimed actor of female roles in the 1650s whose career is ruined by King Charles II's decree reversing Puritan rules that banished actresses from the stage. Claire Danes plays Maria, his devoted dresser who is destined to take his place as the toast of the London theater when she becomes the first woman to take to the boards in 18 years.

It should be an enthralling tale, but too many story elements just don't jibe.

Continue reading: Stage Beauty Review

Possession Review


Good

Interweaving two hindrance-hurdling love stories that share a literary connection but take place more than a century apart, director Neil LaBute has taken another large and confident step into an unexpected genre with gratifying results.

"Possession," which is lovingly but sometimes loosely adapted from A.S. Byatt's novel of the same name, follows the germinating romance between two relationship-reluctant academics as they in turn follow a trail of evidence revealing a passionate secret affair between two Victorian poets.

A wild departure from LaBute's previous films -- the caustic, even cruel social satires "In the Company of Men" and "Your Friends and Neighbors," and the upbeat black comedy "Nurse Betty" -- this effort has the melodic trappings of a Merchant-Ivory romance. But it's also a perceptive musing on what has and hasn't changed between the two time periods in the emotional, practical and sometimes prohibitive logistics of love.

Continue reading: Possession Review

Tom Hollander

Tom Hollander Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Comments Quotes RSS
Advertisement

Tom Hollander

Date of birth

25th August, 1967

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.65


Tom Hollander Movies

Breathe Movie Review

Breathe Movie Review

While this biopic has the standard sumptuous production values of a British period drama, it's...

Breathe Trailer

Breathe Trailer

Robin Cavendish seems to have everything. He is handsome, educated, extraordinarily intelligent and has a...

The Promise Movie Review

The Promise Movie Review

The director of Hotel Rwanda, Terry George, turns to another humanitarian horror: the systematic murder...

The Promise Trailer

The Promise Trailer

Michael is a promisingstudent living in Armenia during the Ottoman Turkish Empire, who agrees to...

Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation Movie Review

Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation Movie Review

Writer-director Christopher McQuarrie brings a dark and gritty tone to this larger-than-life franchise. Along with...

The Riot Club Movie Review

The Riot Club Movie Review

Solid acting and adept filmmaking help make up for the fact that this film asks...

The Invisible Woman Movie Review

The Invisible Woman Movie Review

A fascinating true story becomes a deeply repressed movie in the hands of writer Morgan...

The Invisible Woman Trailer

The Invisible Woman Trailer

At the height of his career, Charles Dickens finds himself embroiled in one of the...

The Invisible Woman Trailer

The Invisible Woman Trailer

Charles Dickens may be famous for having written some of history's greatest stories, but his...

About Time Movie Review

About Time Movie Review

Curtis has said he may stop making movies, and on the basis of this film...

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.