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The Promise Trailer


Michael is a promisingstudent living in Armenia during the Ottoman Turkish Empire, who agrees to marry a rich woman in return for a dowry than can put him through medical school. He travels to Istanbul where he meets a reporter for the Associated Press named Christopher and his Armenian love interest Ana who grew up in France. It isn't long before a love triangle develops between the three of them which causes tension in their relationships, but all of that ceases to matter when the Empire begins the Armenian Genocide. He manages to get out of serving in the army, but after trying to save a member of his family he gets locked up in a prison camp himself. With his village in danger, all he wants is to rescue his family and his people, and Christopher - freeing himself of his jealousy of Ana and Michael's attraction - insists on helping in their escape.

Continue: The Promise Trailer

Tom Hiddleston Talks About That Time Tom Hollander Made Him Pee On Him


Tom Hiddleston Tom Hollander

Does peeing on someone really help with a jellyfish sting? Tom Hiddleston better hope so because he tested the theory on his co-star Tom Hollander when the latter got attacked by a gelatinous pest while they were at the beach. Needless to say, it didn't seem to work.

Tom HiddlestonTom Hiddleston peed on Tom Hollander's jellyfish sting

During his appearance on 'The Graham Norton Show' last night (February 16th 2017), 'The Night Manager' actor revealed how Hollander was stung (hopefully in just the leg or the foot or something) while taking a dip in the ocean, and the pair subsequently decided to test an age-old remedy - in the most British way possible.

Continue reading: Tom Hiddleston Talks About That Time Tom Hollander Made Him Pee On Him

Tom Hollander - The ITV Gala at the London Palladium at London Palladium - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 19th November 2015

Tom Hollander

Tom Hollander - ITV Gala held at the London Palladium - Arrivals. at London Palladium - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 19th November 2015

Tom Hollander

Tom Hollander - A host of stars were photographed as they arrived for the House Of Fraser British Academy Television Awards 2015 which were held at the Theatre Royal in London, United Kingdom - Sunday 10th May 2015

Tom Hollander

Tom Hollander - The House of Fraser British Academy Television Awards 2015 held at Theatre Royal, Drury Lane - Arrivals at Theatre Royal, Drury Lane - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 10th May 2015

Tom Hollander

Tom Hollander - Celebrities at the BBC Broadcasting House, Election Coverage. - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 6th May 2015

Tom Hollander
Tom Hollander
Tom Hollander

Tom Hollander - A variety of stars were snapped as they arrived at the BBC Films 25th Anniversary Reception which was held at BBC Broadcasting House in London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 25th March 2015

Tom Hollander

Archbishop Of Canterbury Loves 'Rev'. Sort Of.


Tom Hollander Olivia Colman

The Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby has given his blessing to BBC sitcom Rev, calling it "great entertainment" though warning that it "doesn't truly tell the whole story" of the clergy.

Rev BBCThe cast of BBC2's 'Rev'

The third season of the BBC2 series starring Tom Hollander as Anglican priest Adam Smallbone came to an end on Monday night (April 14, 2014) and Welby told the Radio Times that it amusingly showed the issues faced by men and women of the cloth around the UK.

Continue reading: Archbishop Of Canterbury Loves 'Rev'. Sort Of.

Tom Hollander - Actor Tom Hollander pictured at Radio 2 - London, United Kingdom - Monday 24th March 2014

Tom Hollander
Tom Hollander

Olivia Colman and Tom Hollander - Olivia Colman and Tom Hollander film scenes for the third series of the award-winning BBC2 comedy 'Rev', in London - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 12th November 2013

Olivia Colman and Tom Hollander
Olivia Colman and Tom Hollander
Olivia Colman and Tom Hollander
Olivia Colman and Tom Hollander
Olivia Colman and Tom Hollander
Olivia Colman and Tom Hollander

The Invisible Woman Trailer


Charles Dickens may be famous for having written some of history's greatest stories, but his own life story is probably one of the most touching of all. During a major peak in his career, he finds himself madly in love with actress Nelly Ternan who deeply admires all his literary works. He takes regular trips to London to visit her despite already being married to Catherine Thomson for more than 20 years, and Nelly's mother Frances regularly voices her concerns about what the relationship could mean for her 18-year-old daughter's future. Despite all odds, Dickens is determined to spend the rest of his life with his new lover even if that means a scandalous separation from his wife. In a bid to lower the impact it might have on his career, he vows to keep his new relationship a secret from the public.

Continue: The Invisible Woman Trailer

About Time Review


Weak

Curtis has said he may stop making movies, and on the basis of this film you can kind of see why: he's clearly in a rut. While this romance attempts a bit of magical whimsy, it's the same collection of sassy comedy, romantic drama and sudsy sentimentality that characterised Love Actually and Notting Hill. More troubling is how it presents that same almost offensively slanted view of British society.

The magical element is time travel, as young Tim (Gleeson) learns from his father (Nighy) that the men in his family can flit back along their timelines at will, reliving past events and fixing things where needed. Tim decides this will come in handy as he looks for a wife, and indeed he uses his skill to circle round and round charming American Mary (McAdams) until they fall in love. And over the next several years, as he figures out how to make their life together as amazing as possible, he learns that there are some limitations to this gift.

As always, Curtis gives his characters a fantasy level of wealth that doesn't really make sense. We never see Tim travel back to win the lottery, but there's no other explanation for how he and Mary are able to buy a house in a posh Maida Vale street. And these characters also live in an imagined pocket of London that has no diversity at all, as we never see anyone who isn't white and straight. But then, Tim's idyllic childhood on the Cornish coast isn't exactly believable either, complete with a quirky earth-adoring sister (Wilson) and always-confused uncle (Cordery).

Continue reading: About Time Review

British Stalwart Richard Curtis To Put Down Camera And Quit Directing


Richard Curtis Rachel McAdams Bill Nighy Domhnall Gleeson Tom Hollander

Undoubtedly the king of British rom-com, Richard Curtis has enjoyed a long and successful career, writing or helming some of the country’s most-loved films.

In addition to his Oscars and Bafta nominations/wins, he can probably add a ‘films played most at Christmas’ award to his illustrious list.

But the time has come, according to Curtis at least, to down tools and enjoy retirement. There will be no more writing/directing for this guy. "I waited a while in order to write About Time.

Continue reading: British Stalwart Richard Curtis To Put Down Camera And Quit Directing

Byzantium Review


Very Good

Nearly 20 years after Interview With the Vampire, Neil Jordan returns to the genre to breath some new life into a mythology that has grown stale, predictable and rather mopey  (see Twilight). With a lively script by Buffini, Jordan creates a lushly stylish dramatic thriller that continually takes us aback with off-beat storytelling and complex characters who don't always do what we expect them to.

The story centres on mother-daughter immortals Clara and Eleanor (Arterton and Ronan), who are on the run when they arrive in a fading British seaside town. The resourceful Clara seduces the nervous Noel (Mays) so they can stay in his dilapidated Byzantium guesthouse. To earn some cash, the always resourceful Clara turns the empty rooms into a brothel. Meanwhile, Eleanor befriends the fragile young Frank (Jones) and reveals the fact that she and her mother are actually more than 200 years old and need human blood to survive. Through all of this, they're being chased by two elder vampires, the ruthless Ruthven (Miller) and the more sympathetic Darvell (Riley), both of whom share a tangled romantic past with Clara.

Unusually intelligent, the film holds our interest with an astonishing series of twists and turns plus an array of colourful characters that play on stereotypes. Holding it all together is a fairly simple plot that reveals itself in bits and pieces until the full picture comes into focus. From this point, we pretty much know what has to happen in the big finale, but watching events unfold is satisfying and sometimes both thrilling and moving.

Continue reading: Byzantium Review

About Time Trailer


Tim Lake is 21-years-old and not exactly what you call an expert in the art of getting girlfriends. However, all that's about to change when his father lets him in on an incredible secret the day after a shambolic New Year party; all the men in their family can travel back in time and change things that have happened in their lives. Given that he is so clumsy around beautiful women, Tim uses this to his advantage, giving himself a second chance on first impressions. He manages to woo a beautiful girl named Mary with his advances, having honed them to perfection, but little does he realise just how dangerous his actions are. When he accidentally slips up during one time warp incident, he discovers that Mary has never met him before and that several months of romance have completely vanished. He must try and win her back once again, but accept that he cannot avoid the problems life and love inevitably bring - no matter how many times he tries. 

Continue: About Time Trailer

A Liar's Autobiography Review


Good

Subtitled "The Untrue Story of Monty Python's Graham Chapman", this outrageously colourful animated movie certainly can't be pigeonholed as a documentary or a biopic, even though there are elements of each. The filmmakers use recordings of Chapman reading the book about his life, then hire teams of animators to create a stream-of-consciousness 3D tribute. It's not particularly easy to follow, and the absurdly Pythonesque approach isn't always successful. But the film is such an oddity that fans won't want to miss it.

Whatever it is, this isn't a straightforward retelling of Chapman's life story, although it does loosely fill in the details, with each chapter animated in a distinctly different style. It begins with his rather odd childhood, followed by his years at Cambridge, where he met Cleese, Palin, Gilliam and Jones and formed Monty Python. Their TV sketch show was launched in 1969, an unexpected hit that propelled them to stardom. Along the way, Chapman determines that he's 70 percent gay, and indulges in all the alcohol and sex he could find. He died at age 48 of throat cancer in 1989.

The film is a riotous collection of animation styles, from stop-motion to paper cut-outs. Woven into these segments are TV clips, movie scenes and interviews from the archives, and the surviving Pythons supply the voices along with special guests like Stephen Fry and, yes, Cameron Diaz. It feels oddly rambling, going down random sideroads and indulging in moments that cross lines of taste and propriety. Some segments are sharp and pointed, while others take too long to get to their punchlines. But maybe these are inside jokes we simply don't understand.

Continue reading: A Liar's Autobiography Review

Tom Hollander Saturday 29th October 2011 Grey Goose Winter Ball held at Battersea Park - Arrivals. London, England

Tom Hollander

Hanna Review


Very Good
Pacey and offbeat, this cat-and-mouse film keeps us on our toes by layering the action thriller with fairy tale parallels. And the cast is strong enough to keep us engaged even when the plot skips over some glaring implausibilities.

Hanna (Ronan) has spent her entire life deep in the snowy woods, where her ex-spy dad (Bana) has raised her to be the ultimate super-agent. Now 16, she's ready to face up to her wicked nemesis Marissa (Blanchett), the agent who killed her mother. But Marissa has caught her trail, and as they chase each other Marissa calls in a ruthless German henchman (Hollander) for help.

Meanwhile, Hanna hides out with a sparky British teen (Barden) whose hippie parents (Williams and Flemyng) have no idea what's going on.

Continue reading: Hanna Review

Ralph Fiennes and Tom Hollander - Ralph Fiennes and Tom Hollander London, England - The UK premiere of The A-Team Tuesday 27th July 2010

Ralph Fiennes and Tom Hollander

In The Loop Review


Extraordinary
Frankly, it's a stroke of genius to play a tense political thriller as if it's a raucous satire. Slicing straight through any over-seriousness, this film keeps us laughing loudly as it tells a story that's probably far truer than we'd like to believe.

Malcolm Tucker (Capaldi) is the acerbic communications director for Britain's Prime Minister, and right now he has to put out a fire started by Cabinet Minister Foster (Hollander), who called war in the Middle East "unforeseeable" in a radio interview. Foster's aides (Addison and McKee) are working to keep him on the crest of a tidal wave of attention after some American politicians (Kennedy and Rasche) take an interest in him. In Washington they also meet a tough Pentagon General (Gandolfini), while unseen forces seem determined to rush to war.

Continue reading: In The Loop Review

The Soloist Review


Good
Joe Wright's worlds-colliding drama The Soloist has so many strikes against it that it's hard to imagine coming out the other end feeling anything but relief that it was over. Think of it: a based-on-a-true-story about a cold-hearted journalist who meets a mentally disturbed homeless man who just happens to be a world-class musician. Together, the two strike up a unique friendship against the backdrop of Los Angeles's Dickensian skid row and imploding newspaper industry; a bright flower blooming from the crack in a downtown sidewalk. Also, one of the men happens to be black and the other white.

On paper, the treacle-meter for The Soloist is nearly off the charts. But while Wright (Atonement) hasn't fashioned anything like a classic, and the screenplay by Susannah Grant (Erin Brockovich) is frequently thin on motivation, the film is not even close to the disaster that it should have been. This is higher praise than it may sound.

Continue reading: The Soloist Review

Valkyrie Trailer


This amazing true story is based around the life of Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg, a German officer who, along with a group of high ranking officers decide something must be done about Hitler before all of Germany is destroyed by war. 

Continue: Valkyrie Trailer

The Darwin Awards Review


Good
Poor Finn Taylor can't catch a break. By all reports he's the nicest guy in the world, and he typically toils for three or four years on each indie flick he directs. When they finally hit the screen they flop. His last outing, Cherish, was a bizarre story about a cop falling in love with a girl under house arrest who he's assigned to watch. I guess it wasn't bizarre enough, though. I had to reread my review of it just to fully remember what it was about. Cherish bombed with a $180,000 gross.

Four years later, Taylor drops another oddball flick on us, and the trouble is obvious before frame one. For starters, the name of the movie is The Darwin Awards, which sounds like it's going to be a documentary about those nutty people who kill themselves doing stupid things, thus earning posthumous "Darwin Awards" (as written up in a series of books of the same name) for ridding the gene pool of their DNA.

Continue reading: The Darwin Awards Review

Pirates Of The Caribbean: At World's End Review


Good
An honest-to-God, brawling, hooting, big ball of popcorn spectacle of a movie, Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End fully embraces its ludicrous sense of summer season overkill without succumbing to the bloated tedium that afflicted its disappointing predecessor Dead Man's Chest. Clocking in at just under three hours, it's definitely longer than necessary, but given the number of unresolved plot strands that the last film left strewn about like so much tangled rigging, it's actually amazing the filmmakers are able to tie everything up quite as nicely as they do.

Starting with its unlikely origin as an amusement park ride, the Pirates series quickly mushroomed into a sort of meta-pirate film, a vast and whirligig universe unto itself that drew in every possible nautical cliché and legend possible. Thus the first film concentrated on yo-ho-ho-ing, rum-drinking, and general pirate-y scalawaggery. The second roped in Davy Jones and The Flying Dutchman -- not to mention an excess of secondary characters and familial drama. For the third (but not necessarily last, given the teaser it ends with) entry, the bursting-at-the-seams script tosses in a raging maelstrom, an actual trip to Davy Jones' Locker, and even the sea goddess Calypso. Dead Man's Chest showed that more is not always better, with excess just leading to more excess and a general sense of lethargy -- they were just setting us up for the conclusion and marking time until then. At World's End, however, shows that Hollywood excess, when combined with the right combination of actors and an occasionally smart script, can work out quite nicely, thank you very much.

Continue reading: Pirates Of The Caribbean: At World's End Review

Pride & Prejudice (2005) Review


Very Good
English students of the world rejoice - another reason not to read Jane Austen. Joe Wright's latest incarnation of Austen's classic Pride & Prejudice is a mostly blissful time-traveling bus tour through a giggly and gorgeous English countryside. To your left note the lovely ladies Bennet, all sideways glances, blushing cheeks and innuendo. To your right, lenses at the ready for the dapper, tall, dark, and handsome objects of their affection, Darcy, Bingley, and Wickham! Swoon... Watch them as they play and woo, mismanage and miscarry, repress and reveal. This flighty matrimonial preamble is the pleasure of Wright's adaptation, briskly played in balls and manors. When at its playful best, it dances lightly with humor and delight. However, the film's occasional missteps, rhythm-less moves into the shadows of darker and more serious emotional territory, threaten to sink rather than anchor Wright's film with any of the depth they intend to provide.

For those who are unaware of Austen's novel (it might be helpful to consider that The Lion King is to Hamlet as Bridget Jones' Diary is to Pride & Prejudice), Pride & Prejudice is the story of the Bennet sisters, and particularly, second eldest child Elizabeth (Keira Knightley). These desperate housewives-to-be are in dire pursuit of a man. For the younger girls, and Elizabeth's squawking mother (a superbly erratic Brenda Blethyn), a man's greatest endowment is his wallet. However, for Elizabeth and oldest sister Jane (Rosamund Pike) love is the only currency in which they wish to deal. Convenient then that the objects of their affections, Mr. Bingley (Simon Woods) for Jane, and the infamously standoffish Mr. Darcy (Matthew MacFadyen) for Elizabeth, are moneyed up to the kilt when they ride into town to stir trouble and steal hearts. Elizabeth's very cinematic blindness to Darcy's very British advance is the centerpiece of both novel and film, with all suspense drawn from the "will they or won't they" dilemma.

Continue reading: Pride & Prejudice (2005) Review

Bedrooms & Hallways Review


Bad
This limp comedy about sexual ambiguity among a group of British men who form a "men's group" together lost my interest inside of 10 minutes. It tries to be hip and clever, and on a few rare occasions it manages to actually be funny. But mostly -- as is commonly the case with would-be message movies like this -- it's blah blah blah for an hour and a half, with the audience longing for the credits to roll.

Land Of The Blind Review


Terrible
Not to be bested by Quills and Geoffrey Rush, Land of the Blind had the bright idea to have a scene where Donald Sutherland writes in his own excrement. To do one better, you see the feces plunked down right there in Sutherland's hand. Was this where Sutherland saw his career going? Was he just winding up his pitch with Klute, Don't Look Now, and last year's stellar take on Pride & Prejudice? Was it all really just to get to the point where he could write jibber-jabber about freedom and anarchy in his own poop? Please, Donny, say it ain't so.Sutherland plays Thorne, an imprisoned playwright whose writings have been deemed too inflammatory. The world he lives in is run by a dictator (Tom Hollander) who casts Hollywood actors as news anchors and makes movies that resemble DV versions of Jerry Bruckheimer films. It isn't until a soldier, Joe (Ralph Fiennes), starts listening to Thorne's articulate ramblings that things start happening. Joe busts Thorne out of prison and allows him to exact revenge on the dictator and his wife (a useless Lara Flynn Boyle). The ink is still wet on the new constitution when Thorne becomes a dictator too, sending his friend Joe to the torture chambers for not agreeing with his new regime.Is this what we have stooped to for leftist political films? Robert Edwards' film for one reason or another really thinks it's saying something. It punctuates the cruelty of both the left and the ultra right with equal measures, but it never really shows examples of what is good in either ideology. It highlights the "everyman" as hero, but never sees Fiennes' character as anything besides an ideology that is up for bid. The fact that Edwards fits Joe with a family is absolutely absurd because we don't care about Joe as a character; he is simply there for us to see the effect that politics have on a normal person. It's hollow and criminally indecisive.If anything, you can say that Land of the Blind has excessive, somewhat stylish design production. The castle that the dictator lives in resembles the excessive architecture of some palace in Barcelona. However, this gentle stab at stylizing brings to mind that Edwards was trying to do what none have succeeded at: attempt to follow up Terry Gilliam's Brazil. Not even Gilliam himself, who has made successful, even great films like The Fisher King and Twelve Monkeys, has ever been able to bring his style and politics to such a fantastic torrent. It's possible to see where Edwards' heart might have been in the right place, but his film is too clever, too cold, and too completely self-aware to ever really embrace an everyman like Joe.Hey, Donny, Altman is still making movies, so is Roeg. You have options.

Pride & Prejudice Review


Very Good
English students of the world rejoice - another reason not to read Jane Austen. Joe Wright's latest incarnation of Austen's classic Pride & Prejudice is a mostly blissful time-traveling bus tour through a giggly and gorgeous English countryside. To your left note the lovely ladies Bennet, all sideways glances, blushing cheeks and innuendo. To your right, lenses at the ready for the dapper, tall, dark, and handsome objects of their affection, Darcy, Bingley, and Wickham! Swoon... Watch them as they play and woo, mismanage and miscarry, repress and reveal. This flighty matrimonial preamble is the pleasure of Wright's adaptation, briskly played in balls and manors. When at its playful best, it dances lightly with humor and delight. However, the film's occasional missteps, rhythm-less moves into the shadows of darker and more serious emotional territory, threaten to sink rather than anchor Wright's film with any of the depth they intend to provide.

For those who are unaware of Austen's novel (it might be helpful to consider that The Lion King is to Hamlet as Bridget Jones' Diary is to Pride & Prejudice), Pride & Prejudice is the story of the Bennet sisters, and particularly, second eldest child Elizabeth (Keira Knightley). These desperate housewives-to-be are in dire pursuit of a man. For the younger girls, and Elizabeth's squawking mother (a superbly erratic Brenda Blethyn), a man's greatest endowment is his wallet. However, for Elizabeth and oldest sister Jane (Rosamund Pike) love is the only currency in which they wish to deal. Convenient then that the objects of their affections, Mr. Bingley (Simon Woods) for Jane, and the infamously standoffish Mr. Darcy (Matthew MacFadyen) for Elizabeth, are moneyed up to the kilt when they ride into town to stir trouble and steal hearts. Elizabeth's very cinematic blindness to Darcy's very British advance is the centerpiece of both novel and film, with all suspense drawn from the "will they or won't they" dilemma.

Continue reading: Pride & Prejudice Review

Bedrooms & Hallways Review


Bad
This limp comedy about sexual ambiguity among a group of British men who form a "men's group" together lost my interest inside of 10 minutes. It tries to be hip and clever, and on a few rare occasions it manages to actually be funny. But mostly -- as is commonly the case with would-be message movies like this -- it's blah blah blah for an hour and a half, with the audience longing for the credits to roll.
Tom Hollander

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Tom Hollander

Date of birth

25th August, 1967

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.65


Tom Hollander Movies

Breathe Movie Review

Breathe Movie Review

While this biopic has the standard sumptuous production values of a British period drama, it's...

Breathe Trailer

Breathe Trailer

Robin Cavendish seems to have everything. He is handsome, educated, extraordinarily intelligent and has a...

The Promise Movie Review

The Promise Movie Review

The director of Hotel Rwanda, Terry George, turns to another humanitarian horror: the systematic murder...

The Promise Trailer

The Promise Trailer

Michael is a promisingstudent living in Armenia during the Ottoman Turkish Empire, who agrees to...

Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation Movie Review

Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation Movie Review

Writer-director Christopher McQuarrie brings a dark and gritty tone to this larger-than-life franchise. Along with...

The Riot Club Movie Review

The Riot Club Movie Review

Solid acting and adept filmmaking help make up for the fact that this film asks...

The Invisible Woman Movie Review

The Invisible Woman Movie Review

A fascinating true story becomes a deeply repressed movie in the hands of writer Morgan...

The Invisible Woman Trailer

The Invisible Woman Trailer

At the height of his career, Charles Dickens finds himself embroiled in one of the...

The Invisible Woman Trailer

The Invisible Woman Trailer

Charles Dickens may be famous for having written some of history's greatest stories, but his...

About Time Movie Review

About Time Movie Review

Curtis has said he may stop making movies, and on the basis of this film...

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