Tom Hollander

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TV Bafta Awards 2015

Tom Hollander - A host of stars were photographed as they arrived for the House Of Fraser British Academy Television Awards 2015 which were held at the Theatre Royal in London, United Kingdom - Sunday 10th May 2015

The House of Fraser British Academy Television Awards 2015

Tom Hollander - The House of Fraser British Academy Television Awards 2015 held at Theatre Royal, Drury Lane - Arrivals at Theatre Royal, Drury Lane - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 10th May 2015

Celebrities at the BBC, Election Coverage

Tom Hollander - Celebrities at the BBC Broadcasting House, Election Coverage. - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 6th May 2015

Tom Hollander
Tom Hollander

BBC Films 25th Anniversary Reception

Tom Hollander - A variety of stars were snapped as they arrived at the BBC Films 25th Anniversary Reception which was held at BBC Broadcasting House in London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 25th March 2015

Tom Hollander

BBC Film's 25th Anniversary Reception held at BBC Radio 1.

Tom Hollander - A variety of stars were snapped as they arrived at the BBC Films 25th Anniversary Reception which was held at BBC Broadcasting House in London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 25th March 2015

The Riot Club Review


OK

Solid acting and adept filmmaking help make up for the fact that this film asks us to spend a couple of hours in the presence of a group of truly despicable characters. They're played by some of the brightest (and most beautiful) rising stars in the movies at the moment, but each one of these young men is vile to the core. So the fact that these are supposed to be Britain's brightest and best hope for the future makes the film pretty terrifying.

It's set at Oxford University, where the elite Riot Club (including Douglas Booth, Sam Reid, Freddie Fox, Matthew Beard, Ben Schnetzer and Olly Alexander) are on the lookout for wealthy white students to complete their 10-man membership. They find suitable candidates in new arrivals: the sneering Alistair (Sam Claflin) and conflicted Miles (Max Irons), whose one drawback is that he's seeing a common girl (Holliday Grainger). After the rigorous initiation process, Alistair and Miles are welcomed to the hedonistic gang at a lavish dinner in the private room of a country pub. But things turn nasty as they drunkenly hurl abuse at the pub manager (Gordon Brown), his daughter (Jessica Brown Findlay) and a high-class hooker (Natalie Dormer) they hire for the night.

Based on the play Posh by screenwriter Laura Wade, the film is centred around this increasingly chaotic dinner party. Although nothing that happens is particularly surprising, because these young men are such relentlessly bigoted, misogynist snobs that it's impossible to believe they belong anywhere other than prison. They certainly don't deserve their self-appointed status as the top students at Oxford, who are getting debauchery out of their systems before taking the lead in British politics and business. But then, that's precisely Wade's point, and she makes it loudly. Thankfully, director Lone Scherfig balances things by offering glimpses into these young men's dark souls while skilfully capturing the old-world subculture and a strong sense of irony.

Continue reading: The Riot Club Review

Archbishop of Canterbury Loves 'Rev'. Sort of.


Tom Hollander Olivia Colman

The Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby has given his blessing to BBC sitcom Rev, calling it "great entertainment" though warning that it "doesn't truly tell the whole story" of the clergy.

Rev BBCThe cast of BBC2's 'Rev'

The third season of the BBC2 series starring Tom Hollander as Anglican priest Adam Smallbone came to an end on Monday night (April 14, 2014) and Welby told the Radio Times that it amusingly showed the issues faced by men and women of the cloth around the UK.

Continue reading: Archbishop of Canterbury Loves 'Rev'. Sort of.

Is 'Rev' The Most Underrated BBC Comedy of All Time?


Tom Hollander Olivia Colman

The well overdue third series of 'Rev' premiered on BBC2 on Monday evening (March 24, 2014) welcoming back Adam Smallbone - played by Tom Hollander - to our screens. 

Rev season 3The Cast of 'Rev' Season 3

The show - which revolves around a Church of England priest who becomes the vicar of an inner-city London church - has gathered a cult fan-base since debuting in 2010 and is often considered the finest comedy that the BBC currently has on its books.

Continue reading: Is 'Rev' The Most Underrated BBC Comedy of All Time?

The Invisible Woman Review


Grim

A fascinating true story becomes a deeply repressed movie in the hands of writer Morgan (The Iron Lady) and actor-director Fiennes. It looks and feels murky and dull, and because it's trying to keep everything under the surface never quite reveals anything about the characters or situations. What's left is the intriguing story itself, some strong acting and a lush attention to period detail.

It starts in the 1850s, as Charles Dickens (Fiennes) revels in his celebrity status, adored by fans as he produces the play The Frozen Deep with his rogue buddy Wilkie Collins (Hollander). Then Charles develops a crush on 18-year-old actress Nellie (Jones), who is encouraged by her mother (Scott Thomas) to pursue the affair. But as they fall in love, there's a problem: divorce is unthinkable in Victorian society, so Charles separates from his angry wife (Scanlan) and keeps his relationship with Nellie hidden. And 30 years later, Nellie is still haunted by the experience, even though she now has a family with her loving husband George (Burke).

Fiennes makes the odd decision not to age Nellie at all: Jones looks the same in 1850 as she does in 1880, so the scenes set three decades later don't quite make sense. And there's also the problem that the affair between Charles and Nellie feels like it lasted about two years, when in reality it was 13. These things leave us perplexed about pretty much everything on-screen, unable to engage with the characters or their emotions. It doesn't help that the relationship is clearly doomed from the start, so Fiennes and Jones can never generate any real chemistry or emotion. In fact, they seem barely able to stand each other. Much better are the feisty supporting turns from Hollander, Scanlan and especially Scott Thomas.

Continue reading: The Invisible Woman Review

The Invisible Woman - Clips


At the height of his career, Charles Dickens finds himself embroiled in one of the biggest personal struggles of his life. While working on a stage play, he meets a beautiful young actress named Nelly Ternan who is in deep admiration of all his works. Fascinated by her personality and smitten by her beauty, he takes the time to make regular visits to her home in London - a secret that he is desperate to keep from his wife of 20 years Catherine Thomson. Though having a profound respect for Dickens, Nelly's mother makes it plain that she does not want their relationship to develop into something that could mar her reputation. However, Dickens is happy to suffer the shame of an unusual separation if it means he can be with his new lover forever, but just how damaging could it be to his career?

Continue: The Invisible Woman - Clips

Ralph Fiennes' 'The Invisible Woman' Garners Positive Reviews


Ralph Fiennes Felicity Jones Tom Hollander Michelle Fairley

Ralph Fiennes (The English Patient) and Felicity Jones (Cemetery Junction) star in The Invisible Woman, a period drama based on the personal life of Charles Dickens. Fiennes directs the largely British cast which includes his former English Patient co-star Kristen Scott Thomas, Tom Hollander (Valkyrie), Joanna Scanlan (The Thick of It) and Michelle Fairley (Game of Thrones).

Ralph Fiennes
Ralph Fiennes at the UK premiere of The Invisible Woman.

See more pictures from The Invisible Woman premiere.

Continue reading: Ralph Fiennes' 'The Invisible Woman' Garners Positive Reviews

The Invisible Woman Trailer


Charles Dickens may be famous for having written some of history's greatest stories, but his own life story is probably one of the most touching of all. During a major peak in his career, he finds himself madly in love with actress Nelly Ternan who deeply admires all his literary works. He takes regular trips to London to visit her despite already being married to Catherine Thomson for more than 20 years, and Nelly's mother Frances regularly voices her concerns about what the relationship could mean for her 18-year-old daughter's future. Despite all odds, Dickens is determined to spend the rest of his life with his new lover even if that means a scandalous separation from his wife. In a bid to lower the impact it might have on his career, he vows to keep his new relationship a secret from the public.

Continue: The Invisible Woman Trailer

About Time Review


Grim

Curtis has said he may stop making movies, and on the basis of this film you can kind of see why: he's clearly in a rut. While this romance attempts a bit of magical whimsy, it's the same collection of sassy comedy, romantic drama and sudsy sentimentality that characterised Love Actually and Notting Hill. More troubling is how it presents that same almost offensively slanted view of British society.

The magical element is time travel, as young Tim (Gleeson) learns from his father (Nighy) that the men in his family can flit back along their timelines at will, reliving past events and fixing things where needed. Tim decides this will come in handy as he looks for a wife, and indeed he uses his skill to circle round and round charming American Mary (McAdams) until they fall in love. And over the next several years, as he figures out how to make their life together as amazing as possible, he learns that there are some limitations to this gift.

As always, Curtis gives his characters a fantasy level of wealth that doesn't really make sense. We never see Tim travel back to win the lottery, but there's no other explanation for how he and Mary are able to buy a house in a posh Maida Vale street. And these characters also live in an imagined pocket of London that has no diversity at all, as we never see anyone who isn't white and straight. But then, Tim's idyllic childhood on the Cornish coast isn't exactly believable either, complete with a quirky earth-adoring sister (Wilson) and always-confused uncle (Cordery).

Continue reading: About Time Review

British Stalwart Richard Curtis To Put Down Camera and Quit Directing


Richard Curtis Rachel McAdams Bill Nighy Domhnall Gleeson Tom Hollander

Undoubtedly the king of British rom-com, Richard Curtis has enjoyed a long and successful career, writing or helming some of the country’s most-loved films.

In addition to his Oscars and Bafta nominations/wins, he can probably add a ‘films played most at Christmas’ award to his illustrious list.

But the time has come, according to Curtis at least, to down tools and enjoy retirement. There will be no more writing/directing for this guy. "I waited a while in order to write About Time.

Continue reading: British Stalwart Richard Curtis To Put Down Camera and Quit Directing

Byzantium Review


Good

Nearly 20 years after Interview With the Vampire, Neil Jordan returns to the genre to breath some new life into a mythology that has grown stale, predictable and rather mopey  (see Twilight). With a lively script by Buffini, Jordan creates a lushly stylish dramatic thriller that continually takes us aback with off-beat storytelling and complex characters who don't always do what we expect them to.

The story centres on mother-daughter immortals Clara and Eleanor (Arterton and Ronan), who are on the run when they arrive in a fading British seaside town. The resourceful Clara seduces the nervous Noel (Mays) so they can stay in his dilapidated Byzantium guesthouse. To earn some cash, the always resourceful Clara turns the empty rooms into a brothel. Meanwhile, Eleanor befriends the fragile young Frank (Jones) and reveals the fact that she and her mother are actually more than 200 years old and need human blood to survive. Through all of this, they're being chased by two elder vampires, the ruthless Ruthven (Miller) and the more sympathetic Darvell (Riley), both of whom share a tangled romantic past with Clara.

Unusually intelligent, the film holds our interest with an astonishing series of twists and turns plus an array of colourful characters that play on stereotypes. Holding it all together is a fairly simple plot that reveals itself in bits and pieces until the full picture comes into focus. From this point, we pretty much know what has to happen in the big finale, but watching events unfold is satisfying and sometimes both thrilling and moving.

Continue reading: Byzantium Review

Tom Hollander

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