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Sir Tom Courtenay , actor (Dad's army) - The Winners of the Oldie Of The Year Awards were pictured at the Simpson's-in-the-Strand in London as they arrive for the photo call. - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 2nd February 2016

Tom Courtenay and Actor (dad's Army)
Tom Courtenay and Actor (dad's Army)
Tom Courtenay and Actor (dad's Army)
Tom Courtenay and Actor (dad's Army)
Tom Courtenay and Actor (dad's Army)
Tom Courtenay and Actor (dad's Army)

Tom Courtenay - Dad's Army film premiere held at Odeon - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 26th January 2016

Tom Courtenay

 Sir Tom Courtenay - Dad's Army - UK film premiere held at the Odeon Leicester Square, Arrivals. at Odeon Leicester Square - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 26th January 2016

Tom Courtenay
Tom Courtenay
Tom Courtenay
Tom Courtenay
Tom Courtenay
Tom Courtenay

Tom Courtenay - The World Premiere of 'Dad's Army' held at the Odeon Leicester Square - Arrivals at Odeon Leicester Square - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 26th January 2016

Tom Courtenay
Tom Courtenay
Tom Courtenay

Tom Courtenay - 36th London Critics' Circle Film Awards held at the Mayfair Hotel - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 17th January 2016

Tom Courtenay

Tom Courtenay - Moet British Independent Film Awards 2015 held at Old Billingsgate Market - Arrivals at Old Billingsgate - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 6th December 2015

Tom Courtenay
Tom Courtenay
Tom Courtenay

Tom Courtenay - Edinburgh International Film Festival opening night gala - Arrivals at Festival Theatre - Edinburgh, United Kingdom - Wednesday 17th June 2015

Tom Courtenay
Tom Courtenay

A Week In Movies: Berlin Wraps Up, Dames Judi And Maggie Hit The Red Carpet, Julia Roberts Films In L.A. And There Are New Trailers For Age Of Adaline, Big Game And Crimson Peak


Cate Blanchett Helena Bonham Carter Tom Courtenay Judi Dench Maggie Smith Adam Scott Julia Roberts Chiwetel Ejiofor

Cinderella

The Berlin Film Festival wrapped up last weekend after the premiere for Disney's new live-action version of Cinderella, and stars Cate Blanchett, Helena Bonham Carter, Lily James and Richard Madden, plus director Kenneth Branagh were all on hand for the event.

Photos - 65th Berlin International Film Festival - 'Cinderella' - Premiere

Continue reading: A Week In Movies: Berlin Wraps Up, Dames Judi And Maggie Hit The Red Carpet, Julia Roberts Films In L.A. And There Are New Trailers For Age Of Adaline, Big Game And Crimson Peak

Tom Courtenay, Charlotte Rampling and Andrew Haigh - 65th Berlin International Film Festival (Berlinale) - 45 Years - Photocall - Berlin, Germany - Friday 6th February 2015

Tom Courtenay, Charlotte Rampling and Andrew Haigh
Tom Courtenay, Charlotte Rampling and Andrew Haigh
Tom Courtenay, Charlotte Rampling and Andrew Haigh
Tom Courtenay, Charlotte Rampling and Andrew Haigh
Tom Courtenay, Charlotte Rampling and Andrew Haigh
Tom Courtenay and Charlotte Rampling

Dustin Hoffmans' Directorial Debut, 'Quartet', How Did He Do?


Dustin Hoffman Maggie Smith Billy Connolly Sheridan Smith Tom Courtenay

Double Oscar winner Dustin Hoffman has, at the age of 75, finally switched to directing. While many were surprised it had taken him so long, others were distinctly apprehensive about what Hoffman may offer. As the reviews roll in it appears that Quartet is a light hearted delight and that Hoffman has triumphed.

As well an A-lister as a director, Hoffman brought in some of Britain's best loved actors and actresses. Maggie Smith, Billy Connolly, Sheridan Smith and Tom Courtenay star in a sweet story set in an home for elderly and retired musicians. When an old star turns up, a group in the home attempt to get her to perform again in their quartet, but with old romances and a worn ego to get in the way, it's a struggle for them to persuade her.

Rolling Stone puts Hoffman's skill down to his long career, saying he "directs with elegance" and describes the movie as "flushed with humor and tenderness." Likewise, USA Today was also impressed by the veteran actor's directorial skill: "Hoffman directs with elegance, allowing the denizens to be dignified, as well as adorable. We get a strong sense of each major character." 

Continue reading: Dustin Hoffmans' Directorial Debut, 'Quartet', How Did He Do?

A Week In Movies Feat: Naomi Watts Powerful In The Impossible, Dustin Hoffman Directs Quartet And Screenwriter Dan Fogelman Talks Barbra Streisand


Naomi Watts Dustin Hoffman Tom Courtenay Pauline Collins Billy Connolly Pierce Brosnan Barbra Streisand Ryan Gosling Bradley Cooper Eva Mendes Ryan Reynolds Paul Giamatti Samuel L Jackson Maya Rudolph Snoop Dogg

Django Unchained

After the holiday season, the movie world is slowly cranking up to speed. Although the really big news doesn't start until next week, with the announcement of the Oscar and Bafta nominations.

This week's biggest nominee announcement came from the Producers Guild of America, seen as a taste of the Best Picture Oscar race. The PGA's 10 feature film nominees are: Argo, Beasts of the Southern Wild, Django Unchained, Life of Pi, Lincoln, Les Miserables, Moonrise Kingdom, Silver Linings Playbook, Skyfall and Zero Dark Thirty.

Continue reading: A Week In Movies Feat: Naomi Watts Powerful In The Impossible, Dustin Hoffman Directs Quartet And Screenwriter Dan Fogelman Talks Barbra Streisand

Billy Connolly, Pauline Collins, Maggie Smith and Tom Courtenay - Billy Connolly, Pauline Collins, Maggie Smith, Tom Courtenay Monday 15th October 2012 56th BFI London Film Festival - Quartet - Premiere Arrivals

Billy Connolly, Pauline Collins, Maggie Smith and Tom Courtenay
Billy Connolly, Pauline Collins, Maggie Smith and Tom Courtney
Billy Connolly, Pauline Collins and Tom Courtney
Billy Connolly and Pauline Collins
Billy Connolly
Sheridan Smith, Maggie Smith, Dustin Hoffman, Pauline Collins, Tom Courtney and Billy Connolly

Gambit Trailer


Harry Deane is a pretty hopeless British art curator who has suffered years of condescension and disrespect at the hands of his preposterously rich and eccentric boss that is the renowned art collector Lionel Shabandar. Frustrated at his own lack of recognition in the art world, Harry decides to organise an elaborate plot of revenge on his employer by tricking him into buying a seemingly priceless Monet painting that happens to be a fake. As part of his cunning ploy, he travels to the states and meets a stunning, blonde Texas cowgirl who he enlists to help him by posing alongside her grandmother as inheritors of the valuable piece. He takes her to England where Shabandar is immediately taken with her and goes to all lengths to charm her. Harry's affection for Nicole is also growing and his jealousy of the two of them results in more than one embarrassing situations.

This flamboyant crime comedy is a remake of the 1966 Academy Award nominated film of the same name which starred Michael Caine ('The Dark Knight', 'Children of Men') and Shirley MacLaine ('The Apartment', 'Terms of Endearment'). Not only has this 2012 movie also got an all-star cast, it has been written by the multi-Oscar winning writing brothers Ethan Coen and Joel Coen ('No Country for Old Men', 'Fargo', 'True Grit') as well as being directed by Michael Hoffman ('One Fine Day', 'The Emperor's Club'). It's set for release in the UK on November 21st 2012.

Starring: Colin Firth, Cameron Diaz, Alan Rickman, Stanley Tucci, Cloris Leachman, Tom Courtenay, Togo Igawa, Anna Skellern

The Loneliness Of The Long Distance Runner Review


Good
Overwrought metaphors are never a good thing, of course, though every now and again they can have a certain impact in the right piece of art, if used properly. One thing they don't do, though, is age well, a fact well born out by Tony Richardson's The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner, which tries to use the sport of its title as a metaphor for rebellion, alienation, and, yes, freedom. While this central device of the film hasn't aged that well in the four decades hence, that is not to say that the film is without merit, just that it may be hard to take quite so seriously.

Colin Smith, the classic angry young man of disaffected postwar England, puts it all right out there in the film's first line, "Running's always been a big thing in our family, especially running away from the police." Played by a brooding Tom Courtenay, Colin is doing quite a bit of running in general when the police finally catch up with him for breaking into a bakery (a crime that is only mentioned at first, we'll only see it all much later, gradually built up to in flashback). Sent off to a reform school, Colin at first sets himself apart through his sarcasm, the first line of defense for any proper cinematic anti-hero. Despising everyone pretty equally -- especially the whingeing new administrator, spouting new-fangled psychological nonsense that's as condescending as the school's old-fashioned authoritarian rot -- Colin finds a release of sorts in running. It seems a pure thing, especially when he's given leave to go on unsupervised practice runs in the countryside, where he gambols through woods and babbling brooks while jazz tinkles on the soundtrack. Simple and ultimately pointless, it's nevertheless a sight better than his previous life.

Continue reading: The Loneliness Of The Long Distance Runner Review

Whatever Happened To Harold Smith? Review


Very Good
This strange and compelling Brit-flick has two disparate tales that surprisingly intersect when the father (Harold Smith) of one boy manages to stop the pacemakers of three elderly audience members during his attempt at mentally stopping the watches in the crowd. Whoops. In his defense is a scientist he refutes such mental powers, and his daughter and the Smith boy turn out to be semi-secret lovers. Well-acted and full of droll humor, and worth a look if you can find it for rent or on cable. Unfortunately, it has perhaps the worst movie title I've ever heard (and it makes me not want to see it again, just thinking about that title!)... except, of course, for this movie.

Nicholas Nickleby Review


Good
Poor Charles Dickens. He has the good fortune to be remembered by the entire world. What high school student hasn't been forced to suffer through Great Expectations? Nowadays, one of his books (and he didn't really write that many) is turned into a movie or a mini-series every year. (2001 saw four Dickens recreations on film or TV.)

2002 will earn but a single Dickens adaptation, a motion picture of Nicholas Nickleby, perhaps Dickens' least-read work and one of his most wandering (the novel being more than 800 pages long).

Continue reading: Nicholas Nickleby Review

Doctor Zhivago Review


Essential
For some people, David Lean's name is synonymous with over-direction, but in Doctor Zhivago, as in Lawrence of Arabia, Lean had a theme and canvas to match his epic style. Boris Pasternak's novel was one of the best novels of the 20th century, and probably the best anti-communist novel ever written. The book is not a political novel so much as a romance -- but the doomed romance of Zhivago and Lara is a damning comment on an ideology and regime that robbed its people of their private lives and passions.

In Lean's hands, the book is transformed into a sprawling epic and a lot of the subtlety is removed -- but despite all the lurid images and overdramatic camera work, the result is not as overwrought as one might have expected. After all, Russia is a big place, and communism is a big subject. Fortunately, the screenwriters of yesterday were not as heavy-handed as today's, and often the dialogue is nearly as rich as the costumes and settings.

Continue reading: Doctor Zhivago Review

Last Orders Review


Very Good
It's a shame there are so few films out that realistically portray male bonding, possibly for fear of assuming an underlying current of latent homosexuality. The oft-neglected theme is pleasantly explored in Last Orders, a journey of three old pals who must bury the fourth of their circle. Unfortunately, while admirable in intent, it also follows several predictable plot patterns that are only saved by the talented cast.

Jack (Michael Caine) has recently died, leaving in his wake a widow, two children, and three close friends. His last wish is that lifelong companions Vic (Tom Courtenay), Lenny (David Hemmings), and Ray (Bob Hoskins) throw him out to sea at the honeymoon spot he shared with wife Amy (Helen Mirren). His son, Vince (Ray Winstone), joins them.

Continue reading: Last Orders Review

Whatever Happened To Harold Smith? Review


Very Good
This strange and compelling Brit-flick has two disparate tales that surprisingly intersect when the father (Harold Smith) of one boy manages to stop the pacemakers of three elderly audience members during his attempt at mentally stopping the watches in the crowd. Whoops. In his defense is a scientist he refutes such mental powers, and his daughter and the Smith boy turn out to be semi-secret lovers. Well-acted and full of droll humor, and worth a look if you can find it for rent or on cable. Unfortunately, it has perhaps the worst movie title I've ever heard (and it makes me not want to see it again, just thinking about that title!)... except, of course, for this movie.

Billy Liar Review


Very Good
Billy Fisher isn't even an undertaker -- he's an undertaker's assistant. Against this pathetic profession he finds himself so bored silly that he daydreams constantly of a land where he's a military hero and ruler, and the two meet at random throughout the film. More and more, Billy dreams of escaping his horrible life, planning to run off to London with girlfriend Liz (Julie Christie). But can he do it? Billy Liar is on the repetitive side, but John Schlesinger's imagination in interpreting the source material makes it worthwhile. The ending remains one of cinema's great mysteries -- not in what happens on screen, but why it happens. Discuss amongst yourselves.

Last Orders Review


Good

"Last Orders" is a humorous and human, intelligent and emotional movie about the ups and downs of lifelong friendship and about living long-term with decisions, mistakes and regrets of youth. It's exactly the kind of movie adults are wishing for when they complain nobody makes movies for adults anymore -- and it's a simple but wonderful example of how good grown-up movies can be.

Based on a Booker Prize-winning novel by Graham Swift, half the film stars Bob Hoskins, Tom Courtenay and David Hemmings as three old pub pals on an afternoon's road trip to take a fourth buddy's ashes to the sea at a low-end English resort. The other half takes place in flashbacks that establish the history of this foursome who saw each other through 50 years of workaday trials, including war, love, parenthood, financial woes, marital woes and more.

Michael Caine takes center stage in these flashbacks as the fourth friend who passed away before the film began -- a butcher named Jack who always tried to remain jolly in the face of life's petty and not-so-petty adversities. Married too young due to a pregnancy (in an even further-back flashback) -- but to a girl he absolutely loved (played in her graying years by the wonderful Helen Mirren) -- Jack always kept his chin up, even as his butcher shop struggled and his son Vince grew resentful over family secrets that made him feel like an outsider.

Continue reading: Last Orders Review

Nicholas Nickleby Review


Weak

You deserve a grain-of-salt warning before reading this review: Your friendly film critic really can't abide Charles Dickens, and "Nicholas Nickleby" is especially exemplary of everything that irks me about his work.

The characters in this tale of 19th Century woe are largely one-dimensional -- implausibly sweet and naive or absurdly ruthless and cruel without reason -- and they invite second-guessing to a distracting degree.

Nineteen years old and suddenly the head of his family after his father's death, the title character (played by the over-earnest Charlie Hunnam) reluctantly moves with his mother and sister from the quiet country cottage they can no longer afford to dirty, polluted, noisy, heartless London, seeking the help of Nicholas's rich, odious uncle (Christopher Plummer), who doesn't see why he should be burdened with helping his brother's family.

Continue reading: Nicholas Nickleby Review

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Tom Courtenay Movies

Dad's Army Movie Review

Dad's Army Movie Review

The beloved 1970s British sit-com gets the big screen treatment, although there's been very little...

Dad's Army Trailer

Dad's Army Trailer

Everybody's favourite British regiment is back in the new version of Dad's Army. Director Oliver...

45 Years Movie Review

45 Years Movie Review

Like an antidote to vacuous blockbusters, this intelligent, thoughtful drama packs more intensity into a...

Dad's Army Trailer

Dad's Army Trailer

And they're back! The hilarious band of men that put their lives on the line...

45 Years Trailer

45 Years Trailer

It doesn't matter how long or how happy a marriage is, all of them have...

Night Train To Lisbon Trailer

Night Train To Lisbon Trailer

When a Latin professor, Raimund Gregorius (Jeremy Irons), sees a young Portuguese woman in a...

Quartet Movie Review

Quartet Movie Review

For his directing debut, Dustin Hoffman takes no chances, filling the screen with gifted actors...

Gambit Movie Review

Gambit Movie Review

Remade from a 1966 romp starring Michael Caine and Shirley MacLaine, this con artist action-comedy...

Gambit Trailer

Gambit Trailer

Harry Deane is a pretty hopeless British art curator who has suffered years of condescension...

Nicholas Nickleby Movie Review

Nicholas Nickleby Movie Review

Poor Charles Dickens. He has the good fortune to be remembered by the entire...

Doctor Zhivago Movie Review

Doctor Zhivago Movie Review

For some people, David Lean's name is synonymous with over-direction, but in Doctor Zhivago, as...

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