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Timothy Hutton

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Timothy Hutton - BAFTA Los Angeles TV Tea 2015 held at SLS Hotel - Arrivals at SLS Hotel - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 19th September 2015

Timothy Hutton
Timothy Hutton
Timothy Hutton
Timothy Hutton
Timothy Hutton
Timothy Hutton

Timothy Hutton - BAFTA Los Angeles TV Tea 2015 at the SLS Hotel - Arrivals at SLS Hotel - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Saturday 19th September 2015

Timothy Hutton
Timothy Hutton
Timothy Hutton

Timothy Hutton and Felicity Huffman - 'American Crime' ATAS special screening held at Walt Disney Studio - Arrivals at Disney - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 8th May 2015

Timothy Hutton and Felicity Huffman
Timothy Hutton
Timothy Hutton
Timothy Hutton
Timothy Hutton and Felicity Huffman
Timothy Hutton and Felicity Huffman

Timothy Hutton - Shots of a number of stars as they attended the premiere screening of'American Crime' The screening was held at the Ace Hotel in Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 1st March 2015

Timothy Hutton
Felicity Huffman and Timothy Hutton
Felicity Huffman and Timothy Hutton
Felicity Huffman and Timothy Hutton
Felicity Huffman and Timothy Hutton
Felicity Huffman and Timothy Hutton

Felicity Huffman and Timothy Hutton - Premiere of ABC's 'American Crime' at Ace Hotel - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 28th February 2015

Felicity Huffman and Timothy Hutton
Felicity Huffman
Felicity Huffman
Felicity Huffman
Felicity Huffman
Felicity Huffman and Timothy Hutton

Felicity Huffman, Paul Lee and Timothy Hutton - Disney & ABC Television Group's TCA Winter Press Tour - Arrivals at The Langham Huntington Hotel and Spa, Disney - Pasadena, California, United States - Wednesday 14th January 2015

Felicity Huffman, Paul Lee and Timothy Hutton
Felicity Huffman, Paul Lee and Timothy Hutton
Felicity Huffman, Paul Lee and Timothy Hutton
Felicity Huffman, Paul Lee and Timothy Hutton
Felicity Huffman, Paul Lee and Timothy Hutton
Felicity Huffman, Paul Lee and Timothy Hutton

Felicity Huffman, Timothy Hutton, Guest and John Ridley - A host of stars turned out for the Disney ABC Television Critics Aassociation Winter Press Tour which was held at the Langham Huntington Hotel in Pasadena, California, United States - Thursday 15th January 2015

Felicity Huffman, Timothy Hutton, Guest and John Ridley
Felicity Huffman, Paul Lee and Timothy Hutton
Felicity Huffman, Paul Lee and Timothy Hutton
Felicity Huffman
Felicity Huffman
Felicity Huffman

Johnny Ortiz, Elvis Nolasco, Felicity Huffman, Timothy Hutton and Benito Martinez - Entertainment Weekly and ABC Network 2014 Upfront Presentation - Arrivals - Manhattan, New York, United States - Tuesday 13th May 2014

Johnny Ortiz, Elvis Nolasco, Felicity Huffman, Timothy Hutton and Benito Martinez
Felicity Huffman and Timothy Hutton
Felicity Huffman and Johny Ortiz
Felicity Huffman
Felicity Huffman
Felicity Huffman

Felicity Huffman and Timothy Hutton - Entertainment Weekly and ABC Network 2014 Upfront Presentation - Arrivals - Manhattan, New York, United States - Wednesday 14th May 2014

Felicity Huffman and Timothy Hutton

Timothy Hutton - Giancarlo Esposito is honored with a Star on the Hollywood Blvd Walk of Fame - Hollywood, California, United States - Tuesday 29th April 2014

Timothy Hutton
Giancarlo Esposito and Timothy Hutton
Timothy Hutton
Giancarlo Esposito and Timothy Hutton

The Good Shepherd Review


Excellent
Starting in the hot mess of the 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion, reaching back to the 1930s and then hopscotching back and forth between those dates whenever the mood strikes it, the pleasingly complex espionage epic The Good Shepherd tries to tell the story of the birth, rise, and (in a sense) death of the Central Intelligence Agency through the fictional composite character Edward Wilson (Matt Damon). It's a monumental piece of history to bite off, but Eric Roth's ambitious, multilayered script certainly makes a good attempt at digesting it for us.

While the CIA's roots in the WWII-era OSS (Office of Strategic Services) are well established, very few films have rooted the American spy service as firmly as this one does in its starched, prim and proper WASP world. Wilson, played by Damon as a tight-lipped, practically invisible cipher, comes from one of that world's better families, and so is a shoo-in for Yale's secret Skull & Bones society once he does a little snooping for the FBI on his pro-Nazi poetry professor (Michael Gambon). Smart and stoic, Wilson shoots up the OSS ranks and soon is masterminding the CIA's global subterfuge against the Soviets.

Continue reading: The Good Shepherd Review

Taps Review


Very Good
Thank goodness that Timothy Hutton didn't have the career of, let's say, Sean Penn or Tom Cruise. It would have been tough to stomach years of fragile acting, the kind that some might label "sensitive," but soon becomes annoying. It's a good thing the same semi-anonymous fate didn't befall Penn or Cruise (before he apparently lost his mind). Both of them have sizeable roles in Taps, a solid 1981 drama featuring then-recent Academy Award winner Hutton. Cruise and Penn, both relatively unknown at the time, provide Taps with the soul-searching gravity that propels it beyond hunks-with-guns fare.

Hutton plays Brian, a loyal student and rising senior at a prestigious military school. With the school on the verge of closing, Brian and his classmates bear arms so the school remains open. Things start off grandly, with the boys holding off the state police and standing for their principles. As the days pass and the stakes get higher, the students (some of whom aren't in their teens) unravel. Are they doing the right thing or are they sticking with a lost cause?

Continue reading: Taps Review

Secret Window Review


Weak
Secret Window, the umpteenth film based on a Stephen King novella (Secret Window, Secret Garden), shares a striking resemblance to one of King's best films, Misery. This time around, the writer is held captive in his own home by an obsessed fan who insists he rewrite the ending to one of his novels. Sound familiar? After Window's first few scenes, it seems the film is destined to be a remix of its predecessor. Yet, what we ultimately receive in Window is a clear disappointment, not because it follows a familiar formula, but because it lacks the suspense and action so prevalent in King's novels.

The fan, John Shooter (John Turturro), believes novelist Mort Rainey (Johnny Depp) has plagiarized one of his novels. Shooter shows up at Rainey's rustic, upstate New York cabin ready to inflict whatever force necessary on Rainey until he admits to copying Shooter's work. Rainey is completely unprepared to deal with the situation. Rainey is struggling to come up with an idea for his latest novel and is dealing with the pain of his pending divorce to wife Amy (Maria Bello). When bad things start happening, Rainey immediately suspects Amy's home-wrecking boyfriend Ted (Timothy Hutton) could be the mastermind behind the madness. Rainey hires a private investigator (Charles S. Dutton) to sniff around the town, patrol his cabin at night, and conduct the investigative work Rainey himself is too lazy to do.

Continue reading: Secret Window Review

Q & A Review


Good
Sidney Lumet's sprawling cop/DA drama shows promise but ends up muddled and confused, the victim of a few too many subplots and side characters -- all of whom get killed. Nolte is hilariously bad and good at the same time as a corrupt cop, while Hutton is the earnest DA trying to bust him. Remarkably mediocre.

Continue reading: Q & A Review

Everybody's All-American Review


OK
The most striking thing in Everybody's All-American, aside from the atrocious hair and make-up work in the movie's last 20 minutes, is in how little of the material is noteworthy. The drama covers four decades, the demise of the Old South, marital infidelity, and the perils of hero worship and bankruptcy. However, director Taylor Hackford and screenwriter Tom Rickman make the mistake of profiling problems, and not the people dealing with them.

Everybody's All-American stars Dennis Quaid and Jessica Lange, who first meet at Louisiana State University. He's Gavin Grey, an earnest football star who can do no wrong; she's Babs, the beauty queen who sees them as a couple and nothing else. They marry. He gets drafted to play in the National Football League and they build a life together. They have lots of kids, start a business and try to maintain the glowing example they set for an adoring campus.

Continue reading: Everybody's All-American Review

The Falcon And The Snowman Review


Excellent
Underseen (and true) spy drama set in the early 1970s, The Falcon and the Snowman tells the perplexing tale of Christopher Boyce (Hutton), a low-level document controller who filtered reams of material to the Soviet Union. His mistake? Using his coked-up drug pusher buddy (Penn) as his bagman. As Penn's character falls apart, so does the plan. And in a way, so does the film. While most of Falcon is great, some of it drags and doesn't make sense. Still, you do get to hear a bit about Boyce's motivation: His conscience, which told him to expose the CIA for some of its more nefarious and off-topic activities. A good companion piece to better-known thrillers of the era like All the President's Men.

French Kiss Review


Very Good
Now this is the way a romantic comedy should be made.

Redeeming the genre from last week's dismal While You Were Sleeping, Meg Ryan and Kevin Kline manage to deliver hilarious and surprisingly touching performances in French Kiss. Ryan plays Kate, a seriously neurotic woman who takes the phrase "obsessive-compulsive" to new lows. Charlie (Timothy Hutton) is Kate's fiancee, an up-and-coming doctor who, when Kate is too afraid to board the airplane, takes a week-long business trip to Paris alone.

Continue reading: French Kiss Review

The Dark Half Review


Good
Genuinely scary though unmemorable Stephen King thriller features a pedantic writer tormented by his "dark half," who enjoys writing twisted horror stories. Recently out on DVD, and worth a look for Timothy Hutton's freaky portrayal of the two halves.

Kinsey Review


Excellent
In 1948, Alfred Kinsey, a goofy-looking professor from Indiana University previously known (if at all) for his long and laborious study of gull wasps, published Sexual Behavior in the American Male, and the country was never the same. For years, Kinsey had been trekking across the country with his team of researchers, interviewing and studying thousands of people about their sexual attitudes and behavior. His book was the result of this survey, and it tried to prove to Americans - many of whom were starting to believe the Cold War propaganda of conformity being forced upon them - that their fellow citizens were much more sexually diverse (and perverse) than had ever been previously thought.

In Kinsey, writer/director Bill Condon (Gods and Monsters) makes all this into a divertingly fresh story about a scientific crusader who was just too honest and inquisitive for his own good. But rather than taking a straightforward biographical approach, Condon fortunately makes the film a character study of Kinsey himself, wisely placing star Liam Neeson front and center. The film opens in black and white, Neeson quizzing his researchers on how best to interview a subject for the study. He's forthright, strong-willed and oddly provocative - you'd give up your life story to this guy in about ten seconds.

Continue reading: Kinsey Review

Deterrence Review


Excellent
It would be easy -- almost mandatory -- to dismiss Deterrence as a ridiculous piece of late night paranoia (Plot: The president (played by Kevin Pollak!?) is stuck in a Colorado diner during a blizzard, where he finds himself entering a nuclear war with Iraq over a new invasion into Kuwait, by Saddam Hussein's son!). Well, it's a ballsy plot, to say the least. And in fact, it's quite gripping, and I'd be hard-pressed to script a better film given the basic scenario described above. Sure, former film critic Rod Lurie (The Contender) hamstrings himself with a low budget, a single location (a la Albino Alligator), and a crummy film editing job, but considering the obstacles, Deterrence is quite a ride.

Playing God Review


Weak
Extremely uneven movie about a defrocked L.A. surgeon/drug addict (Duchovny) who falls in with a two-bit mobster (Hutton) and his gorgeous moll (Jolie). A curious premise and a strong antihero are wasted, though, because Playing God has virtually no plot to speak of, which, you know, can be a hindrance to a movie from time to time.

The General's Daughter Review


Good
I really like John Travolta. He always plays that guy with the arrogance and cockiness, but it never seems old to me. In last year's A Civil Action, he played a lawyer who just thought the world of himself. In The General's Daughter, he still gets to play that character, but he has to go new places with it.

The General's Daughter surrounds army cop Paul Brenner (Travolta), and in a James Bond movie type style, he's finishing up another case before the real story even begins. The real story comes into play when a woman is found on a military base staked spread eagle to the ground, naked, and very dead. This isn't just any woman though. She is Captain Elizabeth Campbell, the daughter of famous General Joseph Campbell (James Cromwell). So what really happened? And of course the big question, who did it?

Continue reading: The General's Daughter Review

Sunshine State Review


Very Good
One prominent theme has run through the recent work of maverick filmmaker John Sayles: the search for identity. A need to belong. A desire to know one's place in the world. Within Sayles's trademark ensemble pieces, characters try to define themselves, with many at a crossroads in their lives... whether they know it or not. Most of the beauty and irony with which Sayles tells their tales is present in Sunshine State, but Sayles's narrative is a bit short in comparison to his previous opuses.

The brilliance of Sayles's stories is that he places these people within a much bigger parallel -- a geographical or cultural landscape that's changing as much as its inhabitants are. In City of Hope, it was an unnamed New Jersey city with political problems. In Lone Star -- in my opinion, Sayles's true masterpiece -- it was an evolving Texas border town. In Sunshine State, it's the fictional town of Delrona Beach, a sleepy Florida locale whose land and people are in the process of being overrun by shrewd real estate developers.

Continue reading: Sunshine State Review

The Substance Of Fire Review


Good
"The substance of fire," apparently, is the printed word, in this play-adapted work about a man who is slowly ripping apart his publishing house, and his family to boot. Ron Rifkin appears in a rare -- perhaps unprecedented -- starring role, while Tony Goldwyn, Timothy Hutton, and Sarah Jessica Parker play the kiddies. Be warned this one's largely a melancholy exercise for drama students, but some nice performances help cut through the gooey histrionics to make the film somewhat worthwhile.

Ordinary People Review


Extraordinary
Before Good Will Hunting turned psychiatry into pop culture and before The Ice Storm made suburban angst into a fashion show, Ordinary People opened the eyes of all of us. A bitter and heart-wrenching tale of teen suicide and alienation, Timothy Hutton takes center stage as Conrad Jarrett, a troubled teenager trying to cope with the accidental death of his big brother -- and not doing a good job of it. In fact, he tried to "off himself" and, having not succeeded, he finds himself the sole exhibition in a virtual and delicate menagerie for his friends and his parents.

We soon see that Conrad's problems run deep, as what should be quaint little interactions between he and doting mom (Mary Tyler Moore, excellent here), or he and imperviously upbeat dad (Donald Sutherland, ditto) turn perverse and creepy. His shrink (Judd Hirsch) doesn't offer any "It's not your fault" platitudes, leaving Conrad's healing process up to himself. The only joy he finds is with his new girl Jeannine (Elizabeth McGovern, in her second role ever), who would be perfectly cast -- except she looks too much like Karen (Dinah Manoff), Conrad's friend from the hospital.

Continue reading: Ordinary People Review

The General's Daughter Review


Bad

Only three or four minutes after the lights go down, any credibility "The General's Daughter" might have as a serious drama goes right out the window with the introduction of the title character.

At a retirement party for The General (James Cromwell), a military banquet hall is filled with brass honoring their commander. The camera searches row after row of stern-looking, spit-and-polish men before moving into a close-up of his daughter (Leslie Stefanson), a hot babe of the underwear model variety, smiling a centerfold smile and, except for her uniform, looking for all intents and purposes like she should be jumping out of a cake.

Forgoing the opportunity for a relatively realistic female officer portrayal like Demi Moore in "A Few Good Men," "The General's Daughter" asks us to believe that this porcelain blonde, who looks like she'd cry if she broke a nail, is not only an army captain but a doctor -- a shrink who instructs soldiers in the psychological warfare, no less.

Continue reading: The General's Daughter Review

Secret Window Review


Good

Any half-savvy moviegoer will have the entire plot of "Secret Window" sussed out so far in advance that after the first couple reels the only thing left to do is sit back and enjoy Johnny Depp as he turns this tattered Stephen King B-thriller into a one-man tour de force of gloriously glib psychodrama.

It's a movie that aspires only to entertain with easy apprehension, and harbors no delusions that it's anything more than second-rate horror cobbled together from familiar bits of other King stories (notably "The Dark Half" and "Misery") -- in short, a corny goosepimpler for genre gourmets who wish more drive-in flicks were made with a crafty cinematic élan.

Depp delves happily and headlong into playing Mort Rainey, a dejected divorcé novelist who is holed up in a lakeside cabin, wallowing in writer's block and self-pity until John Shooter -- a nerve-racking nut job played by John Turturro with a Mississippi-backwoods drawl -- turns up on his doorstep accusing him of plagiarism. "Yew stowal mah stowry," the slump-shouldered, slack-jawed whacko bug-eyes from behind the rim of an Amish farmer's round-topped hat.

Continue reading: Secret Window Review

Sunshine State Review


Good

Another utterly captivating John Sayles ensemble piece with an incredible sense of a particular place and its personality, "Sunshine State" manifests the winds of change and uncertainty blowing mightily over a humble island township off the Florida panhandle that has been targeted for ravenous resort development.

Like "Lone Star," "Limbo" and other films from the iconic independent writer-director, this one transports you into the soul of its community through smaller pieces of the whole. Sayles paints a larger picture through the lives of individual denizens who are each struggling with a choice between the rich heritage of their fading pocket berg and the big money being offered by developers.

Some are rediscovering a spiritual connection to the town, like Angela Bassett, who plays a refugee from the island's black community, which made the place thrive in the 1940s before its culture began fading away with desegregation. She couldn't get away fast enough as a teenager -- although that might have been because she was pregnant and her parents were sending her away whether she liked it or not. She became an actress but never made it past infomercials. Now she has returned to visit her estranged mother (Mary Alice) for the first time with her handsome, affluent new husband (James McDaniel) on her arm.

Continue reading: Sunshine State Review

Deterrence Review


Bad

Many film critics are frustrated screenwriters and wannabe directors. Occasionally one of us escapes the asylum and manages to get a movie made (Roger Ebert wrote "Beyond the Valley of the Dolls").

Even less frequently one of us makes a good movie (former reviewer Peter Brockdonovich directed "The Last Picture Show" and "Paper Moon").

But most of the time critics-cum-filmmakers fall flat on their faces like Rod Lurie, the former KABC radio reviewer who wrote and directed the howlingly bad "Deterrence," a cold war remnant that tries to recreate the tension of a nuclear stand-off by giving Saddam Hussien's son a secret, world-wide arsenal and pitting him against an embattled president, snowed-in at a Colorado diner during the crisis.

Continue reading: Deterrence Review

Timothy Hutton

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Timothy Hutton Movies

All The Money In The World Trailer

All The Money In The World Trailer

Jean Paul Getty (Kevin Spacey) may have been the richest man of his time, but...

Lymelife Movie Review

Lymelife Movie Review

Offbeat and funny but thoroughly realistic, this period drama explores issues of family, youth and...

The Ghost [aka The Ghost Writer] Movie Review

The Ghost [aka The Ghost Writer] Movie Review

Tightly wound and told without much fuss, this political thriller is captivating and often quite...

The Ghost Trailer

The Ghost Trailer

Watch the trailer for The Ghost When the agent of a ghostwriter informs him of...

The Last Mimzy Movie Review

The Last Mimzy Movie Review

A mimzy -- to answer your burning question -- is a tattered, plush bunny stuffed...

The Good Shepherd Movie Review

The Good Shepherd Movie Review

Starting in the hot mess of the 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion, reaching back to...

Secret Window Movie Review

Secret Window Movie Review

Secret Window, the umpteenth film based on a Stephen King novella (Secret Window, Secret Garden),...

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