Tim Matheson

Tim Matheson

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Tim Matheson at the 22nd Annual Critics' Choice Awards held at Barker Hangar, Critics' Choice Awards - Santa Monica, California, United States - Monday 12th December 2016

Tim Matheson
Tim Matheson
Tim Matheson
Tim Matheson

Tim Matheson - Los Angles Mission Christmas Meal to the Homeless at Los Angles Mission - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 24th December 2015

Tim Matheson
Tim Matheson and David Ryu
Tim Matheson and David Ryu
Tim Matheson
Tim Matheson
Tim Matheson and Blanca Blanco

Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead: The Story Of National Lampoon Trailer


In the 1970s came the most controversial and accessible comedy ever seen. The National Lampoon was a magazine featuring some of the most socially terrifying taboos and became a groundbreaking publication in the world of American humour. Unafraid were the editors to approach subjects regarding politics, war, sex, drugs and culture, and nothing was allowed to stay censored; it was, indeed, best known for the highly outrageous cover art that ranged from parodic images of Van Gogh and Hitler to a gun threat against a dog. From pages full of laughs came a multimedia comedic world with radio shows, music and television all spawning from that one paper. The most memorable incarnations of the Lampoon were the 'Animal House', 'Class Reunion' and 'Vacation' movies which took the whole franchise to a new level of fame.

Continue: Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead: The Story Of National Lampoon Trailer

Tim Matheson - Tim Matheson grabs juice in Beverly Hills - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 15th July 2015

Tim Matheson
Tim Matheson
Tim Matheson
Tim Matheson
Tim Matheson
Tim Matheson

Tim Matheson - EXCLUSIVE Tim Matheson goes shopping at The Grove in Hollywood - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 21st June 2015

Tim Matheson
Tim Matheson
Tim Matheson
Tim Matheson
Tim Matheson

Tim Matheson - Tim Matheson and his girlfriend at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 3rd February 2015

Tim Matheson
Tim Matheson
Tim Matheson
Tim Matheson
Tim Matheson
Tim Matheson

Black Sheep (1996) Review


Terrible
Chris Farley's tragic, untimely death at age 33 sparked a newfound admiration of his talents, but loving eyes can't appreciate (or overlook) something as painfully unfunny as Black Sheep, the second and final pairing of Farley and David Spade.

The movie is a lazier, stupider version of Tommy Boy. Al Donnelly (Tim Matheson) is running for governor in Washington state, but his chances are hurt by his well-intentioned but reckless younger brother Mike (Farley), who is a newspaper editor's wet dream. Enter Steve Dodds (Spade), an eager Donnelly volunteer who offers to supervise Mike until the election ends. The pairing is disastrous from the start, and things really get out of hand when Mike gets framed for arson. The two escape to a remote cabin, where they encounter redneck kids, a runaway boulder, and Gary Busey, before uncovering an election scandal.

Continue reading: Black Sheep (1996) Review

Fletch Review


Very Good
If you were in junior high or high school when Fletch came out, the movie holds enormous nostalgia value, particularly if you also happened to live in L.A. at the time (like me). Fletch revealed the L.A. that its denizens knew well -- the grungy beaches, the sun-cracked streets, the drab apartment buildings. Fletch's Lakers fetish, and the offices of the Los Angeles Times-like newspaper where he worked completed the L.A. milieu that audiences here immediately hooked into. What's more, we got Chevy Chase at his wise-ass best, in a crime caper tailored to the Beverly Hills Cop crowd (of which I was an admiring member), and thrumming with Harold Faltermeyer on the soundtrack. Sure, Faltermeyer's synthesizers sound supremely cheesy today, but this was the '80s, man. And nothing speaks the '80s like Faltermeyer's Casio keyboards, tuneful yet pulsing with that moneyed urban vibe; I think of it as the safe, consumer-friendly edge of high '80s decadence.

On first viewing (the movie's opening weekend), I admit I didn't get all of Fletch's jokes, but found myself pleasantly amused. Twenty-two years later, I get all the jokes, but I remain only pleasantly amused, nothing more, nothing less. This is a comfort movie -- smart and sassy enough to make good company, but a notch short of brilliant.

Continue reading: Fletch Review

The West Wing: Season Six Review


Good
The death of veteran actor John Spencer -- who played Chief of Staff Leo McGarry, the coolest head among the cast of The West Wing -- was sad news, and it was the final death knell for the once-popular NBC series, now finishing its seventh and final season. That's a shame, because in some ways the show is still getting better.

When creator Aaron Sorkin left The West Wing abruptly in 2003, many people wrote the show off. Sorkin imbued the show with his naïve left-liberal bias and scripted much of its glib dialogue, and his leaving seemed to guarantee an identity crisis. In fact, The West Wing was really nothing more than Sorkin's personal wish fulfillment: What if we elected a strongly moral liberal Democrat as president? Or to put it a different way, what if President Clinton (who was still president when the show started, in 1999) had been even more liberal, and not horny all the time? Sorkin's answer was Jed Bartlet, the imaginary president played by Martin Sheen. Bartlet is sort of a Ted Kennedy with gravitas -- a sententious, northeastern liberal Catholic who, because this is TV, is always right. (With John Kerry we actually had a chance to elect someone like Bartlet, minus the intellectual rigor, and not too surprisingly, the electorate didn't go nuts over him. Of course, Kerry was not as telegenic as Martin Sheen.)

Continue reading: The West Wing: Season Six Review

National Lampoon's Van Wilder Review


Terrible
It's sad that visual jokes about male bodily fluids no longer shock audiences. Now, for films to surprise us, they must include jokes about the fluids of other animals. Van Wilder, the latest installment in the never-ending National Lampoon series, doesn't stop with just a joke, however. It actually contains a scene wherein characters consume dog semen.

Perhaps in a sick, twisted way, the concept of a person unknowingly consuming animal semen could be somewhat amusing. But actually watching a character manually stimulate a canine with oversized testicles is not funny. The scene continues with the character filling donuts with the ejaculation and then feeding the pastries to his peers. The sequence concludes as characters squirt the contents of the food into their mouths. This is a point when gross-out humor simply becomes too gross to qualify as humor.

Continue reading: National Lampoon's Van Wilder Review

To Be Or Not To Be (1983) Review


Good
Over a decade after Mel Brooks envisioned a Nazi musical in The Producers, he got his chance to make one for real, in the remake of Ernst Lubitsch's 1942 film To Be or Not to Be. The movie itself is kind of a dud (Polish actor makes do during the Nazi invasion, impersonates the Germans to get out of trouble), but listen for the dirge theme, which was stolen e-x-a-c-t-l-y from the ominous tune periodically underlying Raiders of the Lost Ark. Listen for yourself!

The West Wing: Sixth Season Review


Good
The death of veteran actor John Spencer -- who played Chief of Staff Leo McGarry, the coolest head among the cast of The West Wing -- was sad news, and it was the final death knell for the once-popular NBC series, now finishing its seventh and final season. That's a shame, because in some ways the show is still getting better.

When creator Aaron Sorkin left The West Wing abruptly in 2003, many people wrote the show off. Sorkin imbued the show with his naïve left-liberal bias and scripted much of its glib dialogue, and his leaving seemed to guarantee an identity crisis. In fact, The West Wing was really nothing more than Sorkin's personal wish fulfillment: What if we elected a strongly moral liberal Democrat as president? Or to put it a different way, what if President Clinton (who was still president when the show started, in 1999) had been even more liberal, and not horny all the time? Sorkin's answer was Jed Bartlet, the imaginary president played by Martin Sheen. Bartlet is sort of a Ted Kennedy with gravitas -- a sententious, northeastern liberal Catholic who, because this is TV, is always right. (With John Kerry we actually had a chance to elect someone like Bartlet, minus the intellectual rigor, and not too surprisingly, the electorate didn't go nuts over him. Of course, Kerry was not as telegenic as Martin Sheen.)

Continue reading: The West Wing: Sixth Season Review

Drop Dead Fred Review


Bad
Ouch. Phoebe Cates, lost in obscurity since Fast Times at Ridgemont High and Gremlins, made this utter bomb in 1991, and poor Carrie Fisher got drawn into the mess, too. The story of a grown woman with an invisible/imaginary friend, the movie is unfortunately aimed at teens/kids instead of twentysomethings who would have appreciated another chance to get a glimpse of Cates in the buff. Alas, it just was not to be. Atrocious and utterly unfunny.

A Very Brady Sequel Review


OK
There are enough laughs to be had in this sequel to The Brady Bunch Movie, but it's hardly a riot. It's hardly an episode of Friends, really. Hustled out only one year after the original, Brady 2 gets to all the gags we didn't quite have time for in the first film: from the surfing accident to cousin Oliver.

The Brady Sequel gets a lot raunchier, too, with a major subplot about Greg and Marcia's seemingly inappropriate budding love affair, and plenty of innuendo outside of that. The primary plot concerns a stolen artifact, which just so happens to be residing in the Brady residence. When Carol's first husband Roy (Tim Matheson), presumed dead, shows up looking for it, havoc breaks loose. Turns out he's a thief and will do anything to get it; along the way he fiddles with that old-fashioned Brady do-gooder spirit, telling Peter he has to "lie, cheat, steal, or kill" in order to make it in "the big house."

Continue reading: A Very Brady Sequel Review

National Lampoon's Van Wilder Review


OK

Have campus comedies really reached the point where fashionable, ante-upping gross-out gags are obligatory? I mean, do we really need a movie in which bulldog semen is served in pastries to unsuspecting frat jerks?

I ask only because "National Lampoon's Van Wilder" has such hilariously droll dialogue and such a witty, charismatic lead in Ryan Reynolds (of TV's "Two Guys and a Girl") that it's just bursting with untapped crafty comic energy that has been redirected toward the lowest of the lowbrow.

Reynolds emits an aura of smarmy charm in the title role of consummate collegiate slacker Van Wilder who, after seven years as Big Man On Campus and $40,000 in tuition, has been cut off by his fed-up father (played by Tim Matheson in one of the flick's many nods to "Animal House").

Continue reading: National Lampoon's Van Wilder Review

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Tim Matheson Movies

Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead: The Story Of National Lampoon Trailer

Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead: The Story Of National Lampoon Trailer

In the 1970s came the most controversial and accessible comedy ever seen. The National Lampoon...

National Lampoon's Van Wilder Movie Review

National Lampoon's Van Wilder Movie Review

It's sad that visual jokes about male bodily fluids no longer shock audiences. Now,...

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National Lampoon's Van Wilder Movie Review

National Lampoon's Van Wilder Movie Review

It's sad that visual jokes about male bodily fluids no longer shock audiences. Now,...

A Very Brady Sequel Movie Review

A Very Brady Sequel Movie Review

There are enough laughs to be had in this sequel to The Brady Bunch Movie,...

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