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Tim Curry Monday 19th October 2009 leaves Orso restaurant in West Hollywood with the help of a cane Los Angeles, California

Tim Curry
Tim Curry
Tim Curry

Fly Me To The Moon Review


Bad
Of all the creatures in the animal kingdom capable of carrying a family film, the fly would be pretty low on the scale. Nothing against the garbage-picking pest, but Jeff Goldblum and David Cronenberg more or less ruined their run as anthropomorphized amusement. It's safe to say that not even a perfectly executing Pixar could salvage the meandering of Fly Me to the Moon. This 3D CGI effort about Apollo 11 -- and three young bugs who decided to hitch a rocket ride -- is so out of joint and jingoistic that you're not sure whether to stand and salute or simply hold your nose.

An intrepid trio of flies -- the corpulent Scooter, brainy IQ, and daring daydreamer Nat -- have longed to be part of some real life adventure. Spurred on by Nat's daredevil Grandpa (Christopher Lloyd) who claims to have accompanied Amelia Earhart on her Trans-Atlantic flight, they decide to stowaway on the upcoming Moon Mission. When the Russian flies find out that there are American insects onboard, they send operative Yegor (Tim Curry) to sabotage the flight. It will be a race between freedom and the forces of evil to ensure the USA places the first men -- and pests -- on the lunar surface.

Continue reading: Fly Me To The Moon Review

Tim Curry and Directors Guild Of America Sunday 3rd August 2008 The Los Angeles premiere of 'Fly me to the Moon' at the Directors Guild of America in West Hollywood - Arrivals Los Angeles, California

Tim Curry and Directors Guild Of America
Tim Curry
Tim Curry
Tim Curry and Directors Guild Of America

Tim Curry Tuesday 19th February 2008 10th Annual Costume Designers Guild Awards at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel - arrivals Los Angeles, California

Tim Curry
Tim Curry
Tim Curry
Tim Curry

Garfield: A Tail Of Two Kitties Review


Bad
Some movies don't require a review. Watch a commercial for Garfield: A Tail of Two Kitties and you know what to expect: An obese, lasagna-loving cat with a ton of attitude, many bad jokes, and Breckin Meyer and Jennifer Love Hewitt (now, sadly, in the Mom haircut phase of her career) generating the sparks of two ice cubes rubbing together. The movie is what you expect, meaning it's a hoot for the slackjawed fans of the comic strip cat and a colossal waste of time for everyone else.

The sequel to the abysmal Garfield: The Movie picks up with Garfield's owner Jon Arbuckle (Meyer) on the verge of proposing to veterinarian Liz (Hewitt). Garfield doesn't like this plan one bit, so he sabotages the special night. Regardless, there's not much to undo, as Liz bolts after announcing she has to travel to London for business. Jon, bummed that he missed his chance, flies to London so he can pop the question, while Garfield, with canine nemesis Odie in tow, sneaks aboard the plane.

Continue reading: Garfield: A Tail Of Two Kitties Review

The Cat Returns Review


Good
This rather simplistic entry into the feel-good anime genre comes from Kiroyuki Morita (last seen animating the raunchy Perfect Blue but also responsible for working on the kind-hearted Kiki's Delivery Service). The Cat Returns is Morita's first outing as director, and it's a fair, if ultimately unrealized experience.

The story involves young Haru (voiced for the States by Anne Hathaway), who rescues a helpless cat from an oncoming truck, only to find herself in the debt of a feline kingdom she formerly didn't know existed. Haru is awakened one night by a bizarre procession on her street: It's the king of the cats (Tim Curry), bearing gifts. Before she knows it, she's whisked into the world of the cats, where she is transformed into a half-cat/half-person, and is told she will be marrying the cat she saved, who turns out to be the cat prince.

Continue reading: The Cat Returns Review

Legend Review


OK
Seventeen years after its release, noted film tinkerer Ridley Scott has returned to his entry in the fantasy genre, Legend, which has been subject to as many scathing one-star reviews as it has five-star ones. Why the disparity? The movie is enchanting and has moments of magic, but it's an utter train wreck, overwhelmed by cheesy special effects, dialogue writ insanely large, and a kind of goofy plot.

To wit: This is a movie about a Puck-like character named Jack (Tom Cruise, before he hit it really big) who wages war against the Lord of Darkness, a demon seeking to create eternal night in his fantasy kingdom by marrying the local princess (Mia Sara) and killing the last of the unicorns. A quest naturally follows, with the goal of saving the princess -- and along the way, the world.

Continue reading: Legend Review

Attila Review


Weak
It's been rumored in some history books that Attila the Hun died of an exploding blood clot while in the throes of sexual ecstasy -- what a way to go, huh?

Unfortunately, that's a scene you won't find in the USA Network's made-for-television Attila, the latest attempt to cash in on the success of Gladiator. A boy becomes a warrior who becomes a king powerful enough to challenge an empire. Are you not entertained?

Continue reading: Attila Review

The Wild Thornberrys Movie Review


Excellent
Considering that I have not watched a Nickelodeon show since Double Dare, I didn't know what to expect from The Wild Thornberrys Movie, based on a popular cartoon from the network. Surprisingly, the film is a hilarious adventure and I shamelessly enjoyed it. The primary audience for this one is kids 12 and under, but directors Cathy Malkasian and Jeff McGrath really took big kids like me into consideration when they put this animated extravaganza together. It features a fantastic score composed by Paul Simon, appropriate to its sub-Saharan setting and is accompanied by a splendid new song from The Dave Matthews Band. Its progressive themes of ecological preservation and racial tolerance also add to the warm tingly nostalgic feeling of the film, but it never gets too cheesy. Let's just say that the Disneyfication of this one is kept to a minimum. It even has a PG rating.

The story follows the Thornberrys, a hodge-podge British family of three generations all living in one souped-up trailer home, as they travel throughout the world documenting nature's wonders. Our protagonist is young Eliza (Lacey Chabert), who has been given a magical gift to talk to animals. Eliza is the quintessential loner, as she is more content with her animal friends than her family's rules and constantly seeks adventure. Along with her chimpanzee companion Darwin (Tom Kane), she manages to get into trouble when she recklessly takes the baby cheetah Akela past the safe boundaries of the desert. Sure enough, malicious poachers snatch up Akela from a helicopter, and despite Eliza's heroic efforts, she's unable to save the cub. Heartbroken and facing rebuke from her bewildered parents, Eliza is shipped off to boarding in school in England. Trapped in the confines of "civilization," Eliza vows to find the lost cheetah cub and to return to her family where she rightfully belongs.

Continue reading: The Wild Thornberrys Movie Review

Rugrats Go Wild! Review


Bad
You would have figured that with a show and movie series as delightfully cynical as Rugrats would have had the foresight to see that naming a movie with "Go Wild" in the title is just asking for insult. The similarities between the "Wild" movies go beyond the titles. Both take place in exotic getaway spots (a deserted island / a deserted alley outside a cheap New Orleans bar in Mardi Gras). Both involve a large cast of characters whose names you don't remember and whose voice you can barely make out through the sucking, slurping, or slurring of something or another. Oh yeah, and both are an utter waste of time unless your mind can't discern between binki-ness and kinkiness.

As if your kid will care, Rugrats Go Wild! is a cross between the shows Rugrats and The Wild Thornberrys, in which a Rugrats family vacation leads to being stranded on a deserted island. The only other inhabitants are the Thornberrys, a dysfunctional set of explorers with a souped-up RV that makes the new Lexus SUVs look like bumper cars. The adults get the idea to start going Lord of the Flies. The babies get the idea to start going exploring, and I get the idea to leave the theatre before dealing with an extra hour and a half of wasted time.

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4 Dogs Playing Poker Review


Good
Take a cast, temptingly mixed with up-and-comers, never-will-be's, and crazy non-sequiturs like Tim Curry, and toss them into a highly unlikely caper/noir and what do you get? Well, a predictably messy, yet surprisingly fun, bit of cinema.

Sure 'nuff, I never could have expected the day when Olivia Williams (Rushmore) and Balthazar Getty (Shadow Hours) would appear in the same film -- much less play lovers. And in fact, the rest of 4 Dogs Playing Poker is just as improbable, with Tim Curry(!) leading four young and aspiring art thieves on a caper in Argentina, only to blow it by failing to ensure the loot is shipped to the man (Forest Whitaker) who comissioned the gig. Our young heroes find themselves in a bind, as Curry gets snuffed and they are asked to pay up $1 million for the objet d'art gone missing. Their plan: insure each of their lives for a mil, then secretly and randomly assign one of the four to kill another, thus collecting the payoff fee.

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Kinsey Review


Excellent
In 1948, Alfred Kinsey, a goofy-looking professor from Indiana University previously known (if at all) for his long and laborious study of gull wasps, published Sexual Behavior in the American Male, and the country was never the same. For years, Kinsey had been trekking across the country with his team of researchers, interviewing and studying thousands of people about their sexual attitudes and behavior. His book was the result of this survey, and it tried to prove to Americans - many of whom were starting to believe the Cold War propaganda of conformity being forced upon them - that their fellow citizens were much more sexually diverse (and perverse) than had ever been previously thought.

In Kinsey, writer/director Bill Condon (Gods and Monsters) makes all this into a divertingly fresh story about a scientific crusader who was just too honest and inquisitive for his own good. But rather than taking a straightforward biographical approach, Condon fortunately makes the film a character study of Kinsey himself, wisely placing star Liam Neeson front and center. The film opens in black and white, Neeson quizzing his researchers on how best to interview a subject for the study. He's forthright, strong-willed and oddly provocative - you'd give up your life story to this guy in about ten seconds.

Continue reading: Kinsey Review

The Hunt For Red October Review


Extraordinary
If any film in Tom Clancy's Jack Ryan series stands out as the best (or even a truly great movie), it's The Hunt for Red October. It was Clancy's first book starring the unlikely hero and the only film to star Alec Baldwin as Ryan. Baldwin does a great job here -- portraying Ryan not as a gung-ho commando, as Harrison Ford would interpret the role, or as a know-it-all brat, as Ben Affleck would shamefully turn in down the line.

Baldwin is perfect, but his sparring partner, Sean Connery, is even better. As a Russian sub captain defecting to the U.S. -- and bringing his titular, silent sub with him -- Connery turns in yet another memorable performance, full of ballsy gusto and cocksureness. Supporting players run the gamut from Sam Neill to James Earl Jones (the only real fixture in the Jack Ryan cycle) to Tim Curry.

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The Rocky Horror Picture Show Review


Extraordinary
Well here we are, doing the time warp again.

Celebrating 25 years of making high-schoolers giddy with its debauchery and high camp, The Rocky Horror Picture Show is back with a 25th Anniversary two-disc DVD edition, complete with deleted scenes, outtakes, interviews, and an audience participation track.

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Valiant Review


Weak
A lithe Canadian beauty beat the tar out of a Disney animated feature this weekend. People opted to see Steve Carell get his chest waxed. Penguins, not the singing and dancing ones, but ordinary penguins, were a more appealing option than Valiant.

It's easy to see why the money is going elsewhere. Valiant clocks in at just below 80 minutes, and it feels padded. The typical Disney trademarks of untested heroes, sarcastic sidekicks, and puppy love are offered, but they feel like hand-me-downs, worn ragged by Aladdin, Timon, and the rest. Nothing in Valiant is larger than life, including the villains, always a staple. Tim Curry voices an evil falcon, and his work won't make anyone forget Jeremy Irons' Scar anytime soon.

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Annie Review


Good
Looking back, why wasn't I scared to death of Annie? Most of the movie featured doe-eyed, orphaned girls either getting abused by a boozehound or doing manual labor. It's part of the movie's charm that I was able to forget such things as a five-year-old and remember the songs.

Oddly enough, the songs are the only memorable parts of Annie, the lavish 1982 John Huston musical. Six-year-olds who see the movie now are sure to disagree, which is the way it should be.

Continue reading: Annie Review

Kinsey Review


Good

Writer-director Bill Condon has a talent for hitting just the right tone in his work. Whether he's paying stylistic homage to "Bride of Frankenstein" creator James Whale in "Gods and Monsters" or writing a screenplay for "Chicago" that re-envisioned the Broadway musical as a wannabe showgirl's uniquely cinematic daydream, Condon always finds a way to seamlessly marry the crux of his story to the strengths of his medium.

In "Kinsey," he legitimizes and revitalizes a rather tiresome narrative gimmick -- on-camera interviews with the characters. For a biopic about legendary sex researcher Alfred Kinsey, there could be no more apropos structure for the story. Kinsey himself interviewed thousands of Americans about their bedroom predilections in the 1940s and '50s to compile his groundbreaking, rather comprehensive and certainly controversial studies on the subject. So Condon opens the film in kind -- with a simple, head-on, black-and-white image of the bluntly matter-of-fact and obliviously awkward Professor Kinsey (Liam Neeson) being quizzed about his own background and sexual experience.

Composing the film around Kinsey's answers, Condon cues flashbacks of an upbringing under the fire-and-brimstone hand of a preacher father (John Lithgow), introduces the equally clinical-yet-passionate student who becomes his wife (Laura Linney), touches on the man's own pseudo-scientific dalliances and their promiscuous effect on his marriage, and sets the stage for the studies that helped launch the sexual revolution.

Continue reading: Kinsey Review

Rugrats In Paris Review


Terrible

Maybe it's just me, but doesn't it seem flagrantly irresponsible to market a cartoon to kids in which a diaper brigade of babies have wonderful adventures when they wander away from their parents and get lost?

I've never seen the "Rugrats" TV show, but the plots of both nerve-grinding movies that the Nickelodeon series has spawned have involved children disappearing, and treated such events as a cornucopia of light-hearted entertainment.

I might be a little sensitive to the subject, but in a cultural climate in which kids seem to get kidnapped (and often murdered) more and more frequently, do we really want G-rated movies giving our little ones the impression that going missing is great fun?

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The Wild Thornberrys Movie Review


Good

Far more imaginative and ambitious than the trivial, cash-in features Nickelodeon has made from its other animated TV series, "The Wild Thornberrys Movie" is a funny, original, whimsical but meaningful story of an intrepid 12-year-old girl's adventures in Africa.

Directors Cathy Malkasian and Jeff McGrath get off to a bit of a clumsy start, catching up uninitiated audience members with a rushed, "the story so far"-style prologue that establishes the Thornberrys as globe-trotting naturalists (can-do American mother and pith-helmeted English father host their own cable TV nature show). In the first two minutes a busy voice-over also explains that nerdy heroine Eliza (all freckles, braces and braids) was given the ability to talk to the animals by a tribal shaman, and that she'll lose the gift if she ever tells anyone about it. Obviously this fact will come into play, because it's greatly emphasized.

But soon Eliza's adventures begin in earnest, when she's packed off to boarding school -- on the advice of her priggish blue-blood grandmother -- after almost being kidnapped by poachers while playing with some friendly cougar cubs.

Continue reading: The Wild Thornberrys Movie Review

Charlie's Angels Review


Good

In one of many joyously over-the-top undercover scenes in the impish big screen adaptation of "Charlie's Angels," Drew Barrymore -- incognito as part of a sexbomb race track pit crew clad in cleavage-flaunting stars-and-stripes leather jumpsuits -- distracts a bad guy's chauffeur by seductively licking the steering wheel of his car.

The way Barrymore embraces the preposterousness of this moment with giddy aplomb personifies the spirit of this comedically sexy, digitally enhanced, candy-colored, B-movie mock-exploitation romp.

A vast, sassy, action-packed improvement on the '70s TV show, which never could reconcile its insincere femme empowerment message with its transparent jiggle factor draw, this picture adds to the mix a "Xena"-like self-aware sense of humor that gives flight to the formulaic proceedings.

Continue reading: Charlie's Angels Review

Scary Movie 2 Review


OK

Technically speaking, "Scary Movie 2" is a real mess. The editing is pathetic, mostly because the script -- if you can call it that -- is just a series of unrelated horror movie japes put in almost random order and tied together by about two minutes of plot.

Characters disappear completely from the story without explanation and blatant continuity errors abound because some gags where left on the cutting room floor while the follow-up jokes were kept. In one scene a character is lying in a pool of blood, then a second later the blood is gone. Then it's back, then it's gone again, then it's back again. No attempt whatsoever is made to cover up this sloppy, choppy, rushed-into-production total lack of cohesion.

But comedically speaking, "Scary Movie 2" is an almost constant laugh riot of extreme gross-out humor and surprisingly limber lampoonery -- and this is coming from a guy who didn't think much of the first "Scary Movie" and was pretty irritated when the Wayans brothers (director Keenen Ivory and stars Shawn and Marlon) broke their promise not to make a sequel.

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Tim Curry

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Tim Curry

Date of birth

19th April, 1946

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.75


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Tim Curry Movies

The Rocky Horror Picture Show - Clips Trailer

The Rocky Horror Picture Show - Clips Trailer

Brad and Janet are a young, innocent couple who find themselves stranded in a storm...

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Times Square Trailer

Times Square Trailer

Pamela Pearl finds herself emotionally cut off from her wealthy father, a conservative city commissioner,...

Saving Santa Trailer

Saving Santa Trailer

Bernard, a lowly stable elf responsible for cleaning the reindeer's stables is forced to travel...

Burke & Hare Movie Review

Burke & Hare Movie Review

You can see what Landis was trying to do here: recapture the funny-scary tone of...

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Secret Of Moonacre Trailer

Secret Of Moonacre Trailer

Watch the trailer for Secret Of Moonacre.Maria Merriweather is a young girl who lives with...

Fly Me to the Moon Movie Review

Fly Me to the Moon Movie Review

Of all the creatures in the animal kingdom capable of carrying a family film, the...

Garfield: A Tail of Two Kitties Movie Review

Garfield: A Tail of Two Kitties Movie Review

Some movies don't require a review. Watch a commercial for Garfield: A Tail of Two...

Legend Movie Review

Legend Movie Review

Seventeen years after its release, noted film tinkerer Ridley Scott has returned to his entry...

Attila Movie Review

Attila Movie Review

It's been rumored in some history books that Attila the Hun died of an exploding...

The Wild Thornberrys Movie Movie Review

The Wild Thornberrys Movie Movie Review

Considering that I have not watched a Nickelodeon show since Double Dare, I didn't know...

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